Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model

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Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a likely short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and its climate interactions. Black carbon is directly released as particle into the atmosphere, but then interacts with other gases and particles through condensation and coagulation processes leading to further aerosol growth, aging and internal mixing. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the global GISS modelE includes the above processes that determine the lifecycle and climate ... continued below

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Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Bond, Tami & Tsigaridis, Kostas April 9, 2010.

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Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a likely short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and its climate interactions. Black carbon is directly released as particle into the atmosphere, but then interacts with other gases and particles through condensation and coagulation processes leading to further aerosol growth, aging and internal mixing. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the global GISS modelE includes the above processes that determine the lifecycle and climate impact of aerosols. This study presents a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing change is -0.56 W/m{sup 2} between 1750 and 2000. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are very sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m{sup 2} depending on these carbonaceous particle properties. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating shell around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particles, changes the overall net radiative forcing from a negative to a positive number. Black carbon mitigation scenarios showed generally a benefit when mainly black carbon sources such as diesel emissions are reduced, reducing organic and black carbon sources such as bio-fuels, does not lead to reduced warming.

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  • Journal Name: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

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  • Report No.: LBNL-3509E
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 983487
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1013860

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  • April 9, 2010

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  • Oct. 14, 2017, 8:36 a.m.

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  • Oct. 17, 2017, 6:04 p.m.

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Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Bond, Tami & Tsigaridis, Kostas. Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model, article, April 9, 2010; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1013860/: accessed December 12, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.