Biodegradation of BTEX and Other Petroleum Hydrocarbons by Enhanced and Controlled Sulfate Reduction

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

High concentrations of sulfide in the groundwater at a field site near South Lovedale, OK, were inhibiting sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) that are known to degrade contaminants including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m+p-xylenes (BTEX). Microcosms were established in the laboratory using groundwater and sediment collected from the field site and amended with various nutrient, substrate, and inhibitor treatments. All microcosms were initially amended with FeCl{sub 2} to induce FeS precipitation and, thereby, reduce sulfide concentrations. Complete removal of BTEX was observed within 39 days in treatments with various combinations of nutrient and substrate amendments. Results indicate that elevated concentration of ... continued below

Creation Information

Jin, Song July 1, 2007.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 44 times , with 5 in the last month . More information about this report can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Author

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

High concentrations of sulfide in the groundwater at a field site near South Lovedale, OK, were inhibiting sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) that are known to degrade contaminants including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and m+p-xylenes (BTEX). Microcosms were established in the laboratory using groundwater and sediment collected from the field site and amended with various nutrient, substrate, and inhibitor treatments. All microcosms were initially amended with FeCl{sub 2} to induce FeS precipitation and, thereby, reduce sulfide concentrations. Complete removal of BTEX was observed within 39 days in treatments with various combinations of nutrient and substrate amendments. Results indicate that elevated concentration of sulfide is a limiting factor to BTEX biodegradation at this site, and that treating the groundwater with FeCl{sub 2} is an effective remedy to facilitate and enhance BTEX degradation by the indigenous SRB population. On another site in Moore, OK, studies were conducted to investigate barium in the groundwater. BTEX biodegradation by SRB is suspected to mobilize barium from its precipitants in groundwater. Data from microcosms demonstrated instantaneous precipitation of barium when sulfate was added; however, barium was detected redissolving for a short period and precipitating eventually, when active sulfate reduction was occurring and BTEX was degraded through the process. SEM elemental spectra of the evolved show that sulfur was not present, which may exclude BaSO{sub 4} and BaS as a possible precipitates. The XRD analysis suggests that barium probably ended in BaS complexing with other amorphous species. Results from this study suggest that SRB may be able to use the sulfate from barite (BaSO{sub 4}) as an electron acceptor, resulting in the release of free barium ions (Ba{sup 2+}), and re-precipitate it in BaS, which exposes more toxicity to human and ecological health.

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: None
  • Grant Number: FC26-98FT40323
  • DOI: 10.2172/993833 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 993833
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1013497

Collections

This report is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this report?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this report.

Creation Date

  • July 1, 2007

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 14, 2017, 8:36 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Oct. 20, 2017, 1:04 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this report last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 5
Total Uses: 44

Interact With This Report

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Jin, Song. Biodegradation of BTEX and Other Petroleum Hydrocarbons by Enhanced and Controlled Sulfate Reduction, report, July 1, 2007; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1013497/: accessed December 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.