Centering Information Literacy (as) Skills and Civic Engagement in the Basic Communication Course: An Integrated Course Library Collaboration

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This article describes a course-library partnership to integrate information literacy instruction with a basic communication course.

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12 p.

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Herakova, Liliana; Bonnet, Jennifer & Congdon, Mark February 2017.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Arts and Sciences to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 87 times. More information about this article can be viewed below.

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Description

This article describes a course-library partnership to integrate information literacy instruction with a basic communication course.

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12 p.

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Abstract: In an era of proliferating “fake news” stories (Fisher, Cox, & Herman, 2016; Mikkelson, 2016; Rutenberg, 2016; Tavernise, 2016), and a “post-truth” political climate (Higgins, 2016; Oxford Dictionaries, 2016), the need to pair public communication and civil discourse with information literacy instruction is more important than ever. A recent study by researchers at Stanford University revealed an alarming trend among students from middle school to college: while students at various stages of their formative education may have a facility with social media use and Internet navigation, they are easily deceived when asked to determine if the information they have read online is reliable, misleading, or patently false (Donald, 2016; Stanford History Education Group, 2016; Wineburg & McGrew, 2016). According to the study authors, “Overall, young people’s ability to reason about the information on the Internet can be summed up in one word: bleak” (Stanford History Education Group, 2016, p. 1). As university teachers, we see this “bleak” assessment as a call for the basic communication course to adapt its pedagogy toward a more critical information literacy instruction and application.

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  • Basic Communication Course Annual, 2017. Dayton, OH: University of Dayton Libraries

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  • Publication Title: Basic Communication Course Annual
  • Volume: 29
  • Pages: 109-120
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

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  • February 2017

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  • Oct. 6, 2017, 9:34 a.m.

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Herakova, Liliana; Bonnet, Jennifer & Congdon, Mark. Centering Information Literacy (as) Skills and Civic Engagement in the Basic Communication Course: An Integrated Course Library Collaboration, article, February 2017; Dayton, Ohio. (https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1010770/: accessed August 23, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, https://digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.