Race Conditions: Object-Oriented Programming Methodologies and Perpetrator-Oriented Racism Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title Race Conditions: Object-Oriented Programming Methodologies and Perpetrator-Oriented Racism

Creator

  • Author: Mordahl, Austin
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of Texas at Dallas

Contributor

  • Organizer of meeting: University of North Texas. Libraries.
    Contributor Type: Organization

Date

  • Creation: 2017-09-22

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: Presentation for the 2017 Digital Frontiers Conference. This presentation describes how the transition from procedural to object-oriented programming mirrors the Supreme Court's shift from a victim-oriented to a perpetrator-oriented perspective of racism.
  • Physical Description: 23 p.

Subject

  • Keyword: racism
  • Keyword: object-oriented programming
  • Keyword: Supreme Court

Source

  • Conference: 2017 Digital Frontiers Conference, September 21-23, 2017. Denton, Texas.

Collection

  • Name: Digital Frontiers
    Code: DIGIF

Institution

  • Name: UNT Libraries
    Code: UNT

Rights

  • Rights Access: public

Resource Type

  • Presentation

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc1010755

Note

  • Display Note: Abstract: Why do we write code the way we do? In her 2012 paper “Why Are the Digital Humanities So White?”, Tara McPherson identifies race as one possible factor. I build on this and show how the transition from procedural to object-oriented programming mirrors the Supreme Court’s shift from a victim-oriented to a perpetrator-oriented perspective of racism. In both movements, simplicity and abstraction overtake complex understanding of systems. Understanding how modern programming technique mirrors racial jurisprudence can help us foresee problems in software solutions to social problems. Understanding how software solves problems will help make it better serve the world.