Race Conditions: Object-Oriented Programming Methodologies and Perpetrator-Oriented Racism

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Description

Presentation for the 2017 Digital Frontiers Conference. This presentation describes how the transition from procedural to object-oriented programming mirrors the Supreme Court's shift from a victim-oriented to a perpetrator-oriented perspective of racism.

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23 p.

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Mordahl, Austin September 22, 2017.

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This presentation is part of the collection entitled: Digital Frontiers and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 36 times . More information about this presentation can be viewed below.

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Description

Presentation for the 2017 Digital Frontiers Conference. This presentation describes how the transition from procedural to object-oriented programming mirrors the Supreme Court's shift from a victim-oriented to a perpetrator-oriented perspective of racism.

Physical Description

23 p.

Notes

Abstract: Why do we write code the way we do? In her 2012 paper “Why Are the Digital Humanities So White?”, Tara McPherson identifies race as one possible factor. I build on this and show how the transition from procedural to object-oriented programming mirrors the Supreme Court’s shift from a victim-oriented to a perpetrator-oriented perspective of racism. In both movements, simplicity and abstraction overtake complex understanding of systems. Understanding how modern programming technique mirrors racial jurisprudence can help us foresee problems in software solutions to social problems. Understanding how software solves problems will help make it better serve the world.

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  • 2017 Digital Frontiers Conference, September 21-23, 2017. Denton, Texas.

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Digital Frontiers

Serving as virtual proceedings for the Digital Frontiers Conference, this collection contains abstracts, presentations, video, workshops, student responses, supporting materials, flyers, and other items from the conference and related activities.

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  • September 22, 2017

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 6, 2017, 9:34 a.m.

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Mordahl, Austin. Race Conditions: Object-Oriented Programming Methodologies and Perpetrator-Oriented Racism, presentation, September 22, 2017; (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1010755/: accessed September 24, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .