Marketing via E-mail Solicitation by Predatory (and Legitimate) Journals: An Evaluation of Quality, Frequency, and Relevance

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

This article studies the marketing practices of predatory journals through the analysis of a a subset of the 1,816 e-mails received by a single university biology faculty member during a 24-month period.

Physical Description

26 p.

Creation Information

Burggren, Warren W.; Madasu, Dilip; Hawkins, Kevin S. & Halbert, Martin December 3, 2018.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Authors

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries

The UNT Libraries serve the university and community by providing access to physical and online collections, fostering information literacy, supporting academic research, and much, much more.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Degree Information

Description

This article studies the marketing practices of predatory journals through the analysis of a a subset of the 1,816 e-mails received by a single university biology faculty member during a 24-month period.

Physical Description

26 p.

Notes

Abstract: INTRODUCTION Open access (OA) journals have proliferated in recent years. Many journals are highly reputable, delivering on the promise of open access to research as an alternative to traditional, subscription-based journals. Yet some OA journals border on, or clearly fall within, the realm of so-called “predatory journals.” Most discussion of such journals has focused on the quality of articles published within them. Considerably less attention has been paid to the marketing practices of predatory journals—primarily their mass e-mailing—and to the impact that this practice may have on recipients’ perception of OA journals as a whole. METHODS This study analyzed a subset of the 1,816 e-mails received by a single university biology faculty member during a 24-month period (2015 and 2016) with an update from December 2017 and January 2018. RESULTS Of those e-mails sent in 2015, approximately 37% were copies or near-copies of previous e-mail messages sent to the recipient, less than 25% of e-mails from predatory journals mentioned publication fees, only about 30% of soliciting journals were listed in DOAJ, and only about 4% had an identifiable impact factor. While most e-mails indicated a purported familiarity with, and respect for, the recipient, more than two thirds of the e-mails did not, implying use of mass-e-mailing methodologies. Almost 80% of the e-mail solicitations had grammar and/or spelling mistakes. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, only a staggeringly small 4% of e-mails were judged highly relevant to the recipient’s area of expertise. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION In light of the marketing practices of many predatory journals, we advocate specific instructions for librarians, faculty mentors, and administrators of legitimate OA journals as they interact with new researchers, junior faculty, and other professionals learning how to discern the quality of journals that send direct e-mail solicitations.

Recommended citation: Burggren, W., Madasu, D.K., Hawkins, K.S. and Halbert, M., 2018. Marketing via Email Solicitation by Predatory (and Legitimate) Journals: An Evaluation of Quality, Frequency and Relevance. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication, 6(1), p.eP2246. DOI: http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.2246.

This journal can be found online at https://jlsc.pub.org.

Source

  • Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication, 2018. Forest Grove, OR: Pacific University Libraries

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication
  • Volume: 6
  • Issue: 1
  • Page Start: 1
  • Page End: 26
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

Relationships

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

Related Items

Evaluation of Online-Only Journal Quality from Analysis of Email Solicitations (Presentation)

Evaluation of Online-Only Journal Quality from Analysis of Email Solicitations

This presentation contains an analysis of ~600 solicitation emails related to 317 scholarly journals received within a one-year period to assess the quality of publishing venues available.

Relationship to this item: (Is Based On)

"Evaluation of Online-Only Journal Quality from Analysis of Email Solicitations," ark:/67531/metadc849982/

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Submitted Date

  • March 19, 2018

Accepted Date

  • October 9, 2018

Creation Date

  • December 3, 2018

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 19, 2018, 12:07 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 1
Total Uses: 5

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Burggren, Warren W.; Madasu, Dilip; Hawkins, Kevin S. & Halbert, Martin. Marketing via E-mail Solicitation by Predatory (and Legitimate) Journals: An Evaluation of Quality, Frequency, and Relevance, article, December 3, 2018; Forest Grove, Oregon. (https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc1393803/: accessed March 19, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, https://digital.library.unt.edu; .