Westinghouse Hanford Company health and safety performance report

Westinghouse Hanford Company health and safety performance report

Date: May 15, 1996
Creator: Rogers, L.
Description: Topping the list of WHC Safety recognition during this reporting period is a commendation received from the National Safety Council (NSC). The NSC bestowed their Award of Honor upon WHC for significant reduction of incidence rates during CY 1995. The award is based upon a reduction of 48 % or greater in cases involving days away from work, a 30 % or greater reduction in the number of days away, and a 15% or greater reduction in the total number of occupational injuries and illnesses. (page 2-1). A DOE-HQ review team representing the Office of Envirorunent, Safety and Health (EH), visited the Hanford Site during several weeks of the quarter. Ile 40-member Safety Management Evaluation Team (SMET) assessed WHC in the areas of management responsibility, comprehensive requirements, and competence commensurate with responsibility. As part of their new approach to oversight, they focused on the existence of management systems and programs (comparable approach to VPP). Plant/project areas selected for review within WHC were PFP, B Plant/WESF, Tank Farms, and K-Basins (page 2-2). Effective safety meetings, prejob safety meetings, etc., are a cornerstone of any successful safety program. In an effort to improve the reporting of safety meetings, the Safety/Security Meeting Report ...
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Experimental tests of transport models using modulated ECH

Experimental tests of transport models using modulated ECH

Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: DeBoo, J.C.; Kinsey, J.E. & Bravenec, R.
Description: Both the dynamic and equilibrium thermal responses of an L-mode plasma to repetitive ECH heat pulses were measured and compared to predictions from several thermal transport models. While no model consistently agreed with all observations, the GLF23 model was most consistent with the perturbated electron and ion temperature responses for one of the cases studied which may indicate a key role played by electron modes in the core of these discharges. Generally, the IIF and MM models performed well for the perturbed electron response while the GLF23 and IFS/PPPL models agreed with the perturbed ion response for all three cases studied. No single model agreed well with the equilibrium temperature profiles measured.
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W-026 acceptance test report plant control system hardware (submittal {number_sign} 220.C)

W-026 acceptance test report plant control system hardware (submittal {number_sign} 220.C)

Date: February 14, 1997
Creator: Watson, T.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford
Description: Acceptance Testing of the WRAP1 Plant Control System Hardware was conducted throughout the construction of WRAPI with the final testing on the Process Area hardware being completed in November 1996. The hardware tests were broken out by the following functional areas; Local Control Units, Operator Control Stations in the WRAP Control Room, DMS Server, PCS Server, Operator Interface Units, printers, DMS terminals, WRAP Local Area Network/Communications, and bar code equipment. This document contains a completed copy of each of the hardware tests along with the applicable test logs and completed test exception reports.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
High density, high magnetic field concepts for compact fusion reactors

High density, high magnetic field concepts for compact fusion reactors

Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Perkins, L.J.; Drake, R.P.; Eddleman, J.L.; Hammer, J.H.; Hartman, C.W.; Mattor, N. et al.
Description: During the past year, several concepts concerned with dense plasma fusion systems have been theoretically/numerically re-examined at LLNL, with a conclusion that they may become strong candidates for future alternatives research programs. A common feature of these schemes is that they employ (a) plasmas with densities ranging from {approximately}10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3} up to ICF-like densities ({approximately} 10{sup 26} cm{sup {minus}3}) and (b) magnetic fields. Their salient feature is also that, if successful, they would give rise to a compact and inexpensive reactor. Their compactness means also that the proof-of-principle experiment will be relatively inexpensive; the same is true for the developmental cost. Specifically, the authors consider the following concepts: (1) liner implosion of the closed-field-line configurations; (2) flow-through pinch; (3) magnetic ignition of inertial fusion. Although the first two concepts have been known in some form for a decade or so, new developments in fusion-related science and technology (e.g., direct experimental demonstration of a high-convergence 3D liner implosion and theoretical identification of a strong favorable effect of the shear flows on the stability of the pinches) certainly make them much more attractive than before. The third concept that emerged during last one or two years, also relies on a ...
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Technical Basis for the Master Curve Concept of Fracture Toughness Evaluations in the Transition Range

Technical Basis for the Master Curve Concept of Fracture Toughness Evaluations in the Transition Range

Date: June 23, 1998
Creator: McCabe, D.E.; Merkle, J.G. & Wallin, K.
Description: An American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard method (E 1921-97) has been developed that exclusively uses fracture mechanics test practices and advanced statistical methods to establish the ductile-to-brittle transition range of fracture toughness for structural steels. The development of suitably accurate analyses had been slowed in the past due to an incomplete understanding of the operational mechanisms that control the fracture toughness behavior of structural steels. New perspectives taken are (1) that dominant linear-elastic conditions need not be rigidly enforced in test specimens and (2) that the effect of weakest-link behavior is defined from local cleavage crack initiators such as precipitates, inclusions, and grain boundary embrittlement; namely, all microstructural features in steel. Statistical models can be built upon such mechanisms that result in defined fracture probability levels and, when coupled to a master curve concept, can more accurately define the true loctition of the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. An integral part of the ASTM test standard development work has been the production of a supporting technical basis document. This document presents substantial background data and supporting theoretical aspects that have been used to justify the method development. The paper will include some of the salient features presented.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Framing a bilateral US-Russian geologic repository initiative

Framing a bilateral US-Russian geologic repository initiative

Date: September 8, 1998
Creator: Jardine, L J
Description: This document summarizes a framework for the development of a bilateral United States�Russian geologic repository initiative to enable cooperative work on the science and technology of geologic disposal of high-level nuclear wastes and fissile-containing materials. Three different types of integrated technical activities in Russia are employed to focus and organize a Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) FY00 initiative. We have specified the items for initial negotiations with the Russians for start-up activities in FY99 and early FY00. These first interactions will generate other activities which, by utilizing Russia�s unique capabilities, may assist us in the development and validation of the US geologic repository program. The current International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) cooperative study of 30years of heat effects on underground hardrock rock media at the closed city of Krasnoyarsk-26 (Zheleznorgorsk) is but one example of such a Russian geologic repository analogue project that may assist the US geologic repository program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
How geometric details can affect the strength of adhesive lap joints

How geometric details can affect the strength of adhesive lap joints

Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Metzinger, K.E. & Guess, T.R.
Description: The durability of adhesively bonded joints--when utilized as blade attachments--has a significant impact on the performance of wind turbines. Accordingly, there is interest in determining how geometric details affect the strength of these joints. Finite element analyses were performed to aid in the selection of three composite-to-metal joint geometries for compressive axial testing. Both monotonic and low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted. Analysis and testing of these joints provide insight into the effects of adding extra adhesive to the end of the bond or tapering the metal adherend. The issue of whether the relative performance of different joints in monotonic tests can be used to predict the relative fatigue strength of these joints is also addressed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
APT cost scaling: Preliminary indications from a Parametric Costing Model (PCM)

APT cost scaling: Preliminary indications from a Parametric Costing Model (PCM)

Date: February 3, 1995
Creator: Krakowski, R.A.
Description: A Parametric Costing Model has been created and evaluate as a first step in quantitatively understanding important design options for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) concept. This model couples key economic and technical elements of APT in a two-parameter search of beam energy and beam power that minimizes costs within a range of operating constraints. The costing and engineering depth of the Parametric Costing Model is minimal at the present {open_quotes}entry level{close_quotes}, and is intended only to demonstrate a potential for a more-detailed, cost-based integrating design tool. After describing the present basis of the Parametric Costing Model and giving an example of a single parametric scaling run derived therefrom, the impacts of choices related to resistive versus superconducting accelerator structures and cost of electricity versus plant availability ({open_quotes}load curve{close_quotes}) are reported. Areas of further development and application are suggested.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Neural network for quality control of submunitions produced by injection loading

Neural network for quality control of submunitions produced by injection loading

Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: Smith, R.E.; Parkinson, W.J.; Hinde, R.F. Jr.; Wantuck, P.J. & Newman, K.E.
Description: Injection loading of submunitions for smart weapons is a novel automated processing technique that can benefit from adaptive process control. This paper describes how the quality of submunitions could be controlled by using a neural network code in real time. Future work is planned to demonstrate fewer rejects and pollution reduction during submunition manufacturing.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Characterization of trapped gas saturation and heterogeneity in core samples using miscible-displacement experiments

Characterization of trapped gas saturation and heterogeneity in core samples using miscible-displacement experiments

Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Smith, D.H. & Jikich, S.A.
Description: Trapped gas saturation and permeability heterogeneity were evaluated in Berea cores at reservoir conditions, using standard miscible displacement experiments, with and without surfactants. Pressure and production history were influenced by core heterogeneity and foam lamellae formation when aqueous surfactant was present in the core. A simple dispersion model and a three-coefficient dispersion-capacitance model (Coates-Smith) were fit to the experimental data. The dispersion-capacitance model successfully matched the experiments in which foam lamella formed, while the simple dispersion model was used only for determining initial core flow heterogeneity. The objective of the dispersion-capacitance model was to estimate trapped gas saturations; however longitudinal dispersion and mass transfer also were examined. The results show that the dispersion-capacitance model accurately fits trapped gas saturation controlled by rock heterogeneities and foam lamellae for lamella generating mechanisms that allow a continuous gas phase (leave-behind lamellae). The practical applications resulting from this study can aid in core sample selection and scaling short laboratory corefloods to field dimensions for applications to foam stimulation and underground storage of natural gas.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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