Hit 'em with copper, zinc, lead.

Hit 'em with copper, zinc, lead.

Date: [1942]
Creator: Kirby, Rollin, 1875-1952.
Description: Black and white cartoon of Uncle Sam and a miner. Miner: "Gosh, I would like to take a crack at those Japs!" Uncle Sam: "You're doin' it every day - with every ton of ore you mine to make tanks, planes and guns"
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Electrodeposition of Zinc

The Electrodeposition of Zinc

Date: August 1939
Creator: Flanagin, Charles E.
Description: This thesis examines the use of zinc for electroplating and compares its use to other metals. Experiments conducted to gather data indicated circumstances which resulted in optimal results.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Magnetomorphic Oscillations in Zinc

Magnetomorphic Oscillations in Zinc

Date: August 1970
Creator: Waller, William Marvin
Description: In making this study it is important to search for ways to enhance and, if possible, make detection of MMO signals simpler in order that this technique for obtaining FS measurements may be extended to other materials. This attempt to improve measurement techniques has resulted in a significant discovery: the eddy-current techniques described in detail in a later section which should allow MMO to be observed and sensitively measured in many additional solids. The second major thrust of the study has been to use the newly discovered eddy-current technique in obtaining the first indisputable observation of MMO in zinc.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
History of Premium Price Plan for Copper, Lead, and Zinc: 1942-47

History of Premium Price Plan for Copper, Lead, and Zinc: 1942-47

Date: January 1950
Creator: Olund, H. E. & Gustavson, S. A.
Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing the Premium Price Plan of copper, lead, and zinc. The Premium Price Plan is described, and cost and production data is presented. This report includes tables, and illustrations
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Here's why we need more metal to win this war.

Here's why we need more metal to win this war.

Date: [1942]
Creator: unknown
Description: Poster features a series of six black & white photographs on a black background. The photographs are of military weapons, vehicles, aircraft, and a ship. Each photograph has a caption describing the amount of copper, zinc, and lead used to manufacture the equipment shown.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
[5,10,15,20-Tetrakis (4-methoxyphenyl)-porphyrinato] zinc dichloromethane disolvate

[5,10,15,20-Tetrakis (4-methoxyphenyl)-porphyrinato] zinc dichloromethane disolvate

Date: July 2, 2013
Creator: McGill, Sean; Nesterov, Vladimir N. & Gould, Stephanie L.
Description: Article on 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)-porphyrinato] zinc dichloromethane disolvate.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Evaluation of zinc toxicity using neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays: response quantification and entry pathway analysis.

Evaluation of zinc toxicity using neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays: response quantification and entry pathway analysis.

Date: August 2007
Creator: Parviz, Maryam
Description: Murine neuronal networks, derived from embryonic frontal cortex (FC) tissue grown on microelectrode arrays, were used to investigate zinc toxicity at concentrations ranging from 20 to 2000 mM total zinc acetate added to the culture medium. Continual multi-channel recording of spontaneous action potential generation allowed a quantitative analysis of the temporal evolution of network spike activity generation at specific zinc acetate concentrations. Cultures responded with immediate concentration-dependent excitation lasting from 5 to 50 min, consisting of increased spiking and enhanced, coordinated bursting. This was followed by irreversible activity decay. The time to 50% and 90% activity loss was concentration dependent, highly reproducible, and formed linear functions in log-log plots. Network activity loss generally preceded morphological changes. 20% cell swelling was correlated with 50% activity loss. Cultures pretreated with the GABAA receptor antagonists bicuculline (40 mM) and picrotoxin (1 mM) lacked the initial excitation phase. This suggests that zinc-induced excitation may be mediated by interfering with GABA inhibition. Partial network protection was achieved by stopping spontaneous activity with either tetrodotoxin (200 nM) or lidocaine (250 mM). However, recovery was not complete and slow deterioration of network activity continued over 6 hrs. Removal of zinc by early medium changes showed irreversible, catastrophic ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
L-Shell X-Ray Production Cross Sections for ₂₀Ca, ₂₆Fe, ₂₈Ni, ₂₉Cu, ₃₀Zn, ₃₁Ga, and ₃₂Ge by Hydrogen, Helium, and Lithium Ions

L-Shell X-Ray Production Cross Sections for ₂₀Ca, ₂₆Fe, ₂₈Ni, ₂₉Cu, ₃₀Zn, ₃₁Ga, and ₃₂Ge by Hydrogen, Helium, and Lithium Ions

Date: May 1992
Creator: McNeir, Michael Ridge
Description: L-shell x-ray production cross sections are presented for Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, and Ge by 0.5- to 5.0-MeV protons and by 0.5- to 8.0-MeV helium ions and Ca, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ge by 0.75- to 4.5-MeV lithium ions. These measurements are compared to the first Born theory and the perturbed-stationary- state theory with energy-loss, Coulomb deflection, and relativistic corrections (ECPSSR). The results are also compared to previous experimental investigations. The high precision x-ray measurements were performed with a windowless Si(Li) detector. The efficiency of the detector was determined by the use of thin target atomic-field bremsstrahlung produced by 66.5 keV electrons. The measured bremsstrahlung spectra were compared to theoretical bremsstrahlung distributions in order to obtain an efficiency versus energy curve. The targets for the measurement were manufactured by the vacuum evaporation of the target element onto thin foils of carbon. Impurities in the carbon caused interferences inthe L-shell x-ray peaks. Special cleansing procedures were developed that reduced the impurity concentrations in the carbon foil, making the use of less than 5 μg/cm^2 targets possible. The first Born theory is seen to greatly overpredict the data at low ion energies. The ECPSSR theory matches the data very well at ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Rediscovery of the Elements: The Harz Mountains and Göttingen

Rediscovery of the Elements: The Harz Mountains and Göttingen

Date: Spring 2012
Creator: Marshall, James L., 1940- & Marshall, Virginia R.
Description: Article describing the importance of the Harz Mountains and the University of Göttingen in the discovery of cadmium and thallium. Tourist information regarding the area is included.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences