Findings Pertaining to the Framework of Guidance for Building Good Digital Collections

Findings Pertaining to the Framework of Guidance for Building Good Digital Collections

Date: October 2006
Creator: Cole, Timothy W.; Jackson, Amy S.; Palmer, Carole L.; Shreeves, Sarah L.; Twidale, Michael B. & Zavalina, Oksana
Description: This paper discusses the findings pertaining to the framework for building good digital collections. This paper is part of the three-year interim project report for the IMLS Digital Collections & Content Project, summarizing major findings October 2002 through September 2005.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Information
[Controlled Vocabulary Graphic]

[Controlled Vocabulary Graphic]

Date: September 22, 2012
Creator: Tarver, Hannah
Description: This graphic expresses kinds of controlled vocabularies as a continuum of least to most complex and illustrates how different vocabularies are related; it includes notes describing the image on a separate page. The slide was used as a visual aid at a workshop during THATCamp (The Humanities and Technology Camp) as part of the Digital Frontiers conference at UNT Libraries.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Automatic Indexing: A State-of-the-Art Report

Automatic Indexing: A State-of-the-Art Report

Date: March 30, 1965
Creator: Stevens, Mary Elizabeth
Description: Report presenting a state-of-the-art survey of automatic indexing systems and experiments. It was conducted by the Research Information Center and Advisory Service on Information Processing, Information Technology Division, Institute for Applied Technology, National Bureau of Standards. Consideration is first given to indexes compiled by or with the aid of machines, including citation indexes. Advantages, disadvantages, and possibilities for modification and improvement are discussed. Experiments in automatic assignment indexing are summarized. Related research efforts in such areas as automatic classification and categorization, computer use of thesauri, statistical association techniques, and linguistic data processing are described. A major question is that of evaluation, particularly in view of evidence of human inter-indexer inconsistency. It is concluded that indexes based on words extracted from text are practical for many purposes today.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department