This system will be undergoing maintenance Monday, January 23 from 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM CST.
Applying Technology to Online Counseling: Suggestions for the Beginning E-Therapist

Applying Technology to Online Counseling: Suggestions for the Beginning E-Therapist

Date: 2004
Creator: Elleven, Russell K. & Allen, Jeff M.
Description: Article discussing research on applying technology to online counseling and suggestions for the beginning e-therapist.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Information
The Effects of Musical Stimuli on the Gross Motor Activity of Profound Mental Retardates

The Effects of Musical Stimuli on the Gross Motor Activity of Profound Mental Retardates

Date: May 1969
Creator: Angelloz, Robert E.
Description: It was the purpose of this present study to investigate the effects of two types of music, tonic and sedative, on the gross motor activity of profound mental retardates. The primary objective was to determine if therapeutic benefits resulting from the application of music could be extended to profound retardates as has already been demonstrated with other levels of retardation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of Music and Operant Conditioning on Gross Motor Activity of Profound Mental Retardates

The Effects of Music and Operant Conditioning on Gross Motor Activity of Profound Mental Retardates

Date: January 1968
Creator: Addison, Max R.
Description: It has not yet been demonstrated that music can be used therapeutically with profoundly retarded children. One way these children might be helped to respond to music, and therapeutically benefit from it, would be to use operant conditioning in an effort to enhance gross motor activity and then progressively shape responses until more complex behavior patterns are formed. Once these children can respond motorically in the presence of musical stimuli, continuation of responding may be possible by pairing motor activity with musical stimuli. This experiment investigated the effects of operant conditioning and music on the motor activity of profoundly retarded children in an effort to determine the therapeutic usefulness of music with such children.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
First Impressions of Therapists: the Effect of Therapist Gender, Gaze, Smiling and Subject Gender

First Impressions of Therapists: the Effect of Therapist Gender, Gaze, Smiling and Subject Gender

Date: August 1988
Creator: Ziegler Kratz, Nancy Ann
Description: Conceptualization psychotherapy as an interpersonal influence process emphasizes how a therapist is perceived by a client. Factors affecting a client's early impressions of a therapist could influence therapeutic interactions since first impressions are relatively stable. The study investigated effects of nonverbal behavior and gender during a simulated initial meeting between a therapist and client. Undergraduates (N = 466) viewed a male or female therapist interviewing with a new female client. Therapist gaze .(100%, 80%, 40%) and smiling (high, low) were manipulated. After subjects viewed one of 12 videotapes, they completed questionnaires rating therapist expertness, trustworthiness, attractiveness, masculinity and femininity. A comparison of the therapist with subjects' expectations of a therapist in general was obtained by pre- and post-testing utilizing a measure of client expectations. MANOVAs were performed on all ratings except expectation scores, where an ANCOVA was utilized. Main effects for therapist gender indicated the female therapist was rated as significantly more expert, attractive, trustworthy and feminine than the male (ps < .81). For ratings of masculinity, subject gender interacted with therapist gender (p < .001). Wain effects showed that high smiling was rated as more attractive and more feminine (ps < .01). Smiling and level of gaze interacted on ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Follow-Up Study of Seventy-Nine Maladjusted Boys who Received Treatment at Camp Woodland Springs, Dallas, Texas

A Follow-Up Study of Seventy-Nine Maladjusted Boys who Received Treatment at Camp Woodland Springs, Dallas, Texas

Date: 1956
Creator: Breining, Wilbur Clarence, Jr.
Description: This research problem concerns a follow-up study of seventy-nine boys who have undergone extensive therapy and supervised training in group-living over an extended period of time at Camp Woodland Springs, Dallas, Texas. The problem under consideration is one of determining the operating efficiency of this institution in its main purpose of rehabilitating boys who have generally lacked the social and personal skills necessary to satisfactory adjustment in their respective environments.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Elias Project: Using the Near-Death Experience Potential in Therapy

The Elias Project: Using the Near-Death Experience Potential in Therapy

Date: Winter 2003
Creator: Winkler, Engelbert
Description: Article describing the therapeutic usefulness of near-death experiences (NDEs). The fundamental hypothesis is that reports of NDEs together with relevant research can be understood to be a modern book of death and dying, one that is not only useful but also applicable to therapeutic purposes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Book Review: Many Lives, Many Masters

Book Review: Many Lives, Many Masters

Date: Autumn 1992
Creator: Holden, Janice Miner
Description: Review of the book "Many Lives, Many Masters" by psychiatrist Brian L. Weiss about past life therapy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
[Copy of Pamphlet: Joyce West]

[Copy of Pamphlet: Joyce West]

Date: 19uu
Creator: Joyce West
Description: A pamphlet from Joyce West, a Dallas therapist, promoting her practice that she claims is alternative treatment for illnesses like AIDS, cancer, and chronic pain. There are handwritten notes throughout the copy of the pamphlet.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Business Card & Pamphlets: Joyce West]

[Business Card & Pamphlets: Joyce West]

Date: 19uu
Creator: West, Joyce
Description: A business card and three pamphlets. The business card and two of the pamphlets are from Joyce West, a therapist in Dallas, promoting her practice. The third pamphlet is from the Lesbian/Gay Political Coalition (LG-PAC) of Dallas encouraging Dallas residents to vote for the LG-PAC endorsed candidates.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Press Release: Lyphomed Announces Food & Drug Administration's Approbal of Potent New AIDS Drug Therapy]

[Press Release: Lyphomed Announces Food & Drug Administration's Approbal of Potent New AIDS Drug Therapy]

Date: June 15, 1989
Creator: Lyphomed
Description: A press release from Lyphomed announcing the full market approval for NebuPent.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Resume: Joyce West]

[Resume: Joyce West]

Date: 19uu
Creator: Joyce West
Description: A resume from Joyce West, listing her education, experience, and contact information.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
[Bio: Joyce West]

[Bio: Joyce West]

Date: 19uu
Creator: unknown
Description: A brief bio offering the credentials, background, ideologies, and contact information of Joyce West.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
An Investigation of the Phase Model of Psychotherapy Across Therapeutic Orientations: Are Different Approaches Actually All That Different?

An Investigation of the Phase Model of Psychotherapy Across Therapeutic Orientations: Are Different Approaches Actually All That Different?

Date: August 2013
Creator: Herbert, Gregory L.
Description: The current study investigated the process of change underlying two different evidence-based treatments that yield similar outcome effectiveness in the treatment of depression: Cognitive Therapy (CT) and Interpersonal Therapy (IPT). The phase model of psychotherapeutic change (Howard et al., 1993) change is used to provide both a theoretical and practical framework in which to assess different patterns of change across the treatment modalities. The phase model posits that recovery from distress occurs in three sequential stages: remoralization, remediation and rehabilitation. CT can be conceptualized as a treatment in which the primary focus is on the treatment of symptoms (remediation), whereas IPT can typically be conceptualized as focusing on interpersonal conflicts and functioning (rehabilitation). The study utilized the TDCRP dataset (Elkin et al., 1985). Survival analysis indicated no significant difference in terms of onset or pattern of improvement across treatment orientations. Chi square analyses indicated individuals treated with IPT spend significantly more time engaged in rehabilitation compared to their CT counterparts. Taken together, these findings represent evidence that the process of therapeutic change is similar, if not virtually identical, across therapeutic orientation. The analyses also indicate that the phases of therapy may not necessarily be mutually exclusive and sequential, but may ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Letter to the Editor

Letter to the Editor

Date: Spring 2001
Creator: Botkin, Allan L.
Description: Letter written to the editor of the Journal of Near-Death Studies on the topic "Allan Botkin Responds."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Letter to the Editor

Letter to the Editor

Date: Spring 2001
Creator: Horacek, Bruce J.
Description: Letter written to the editor of the Journal of Near-Death Studies on the topic "EMDR, ADCs, NDEs, and the Resolution of Loss."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Letter to the Editor

Letter to the Editor

Date: Spring 2001
Creator: Brodsky, Beverly
Description: Letter written to the editor of the Journal of Near-Death Studies on the topic "Beverly Brodksy Responds."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Letter to the Editor

Letter to the Editor

Date: Autumn 1992
Creator: Drumm, Deborah L.
Description: Letter written to the editor of the Journal of Near-Death Studies on the topic "Near-Death Accounts as Therapy."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Brief Report: Induced After-Death Communication: An Update

Brief Report: Induced After-Death Communication: An Update

Date: Summer 2013
Creator: Hannah, Mo Therese; Botkin, Allan L.; Marrone, Joseph G. & Streit-Horn, Jenny
Description: Abstract: Seventy-one clients (50 females, 21 males) who were treated with Induced After-Death Communication (IADC) therapy completed the author-developed Grief Symptom Questionnaire (GSQ) before and after the two-session treatment protocol and at six months post-treatment. Factor analyses revealed three factors - Depression, Anger, and Positive Coping - underlying nine GSQ items. Seventy-nine percent of the sample reported experiencing an IADC during treatment - an experience of communication with a deceased loved one they were grieving. In comparison with pre-treatment, at post-treatment participants reported statistically significant improvements in their grief symptoms, an increase in belief in an afterlife, an improvement in Positive Coping, and decreased Anger and Depression. Implications of the findings and methodological limitations are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Brief Report: Psychotherapeutic Outcomes Reported by Therapists Trained in Induced After-Death Communication

Brief Report: Psychotherapeutic Outcomes Reported by Therapists Trained in Induced After-Death Communication

Date: Summer 2013
Creator: Botkin, Allan L. & Hannah, Mo Therese
Description: Abstract: Induced after-death communication (IADC) is a new psychotherapeutic procedure based on a variation of eye-movement desensitization and re-processing (EMDR). Psychologist Allan Botkin discovered it accidentally in 1995 while he was conducting therapy with combat veterans suffering from grief and post-traumatic stress disorder. During the course of the IADC treatment, Botkin's patients reported experiencing what they believed to be communications from a deceased person. The psychological healing associated with these experiences seemed remarkable. The following report presents the results of a survey Botkin conducted with other therapists he personally trained to conduct IADC. The results indicate that other IADC therapists achieved successful results nearly identical to those of Botkin and that the results were consistent across trained therapists.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries