Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism

Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism

Date: 2008
Creator: Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism
Description: The creation of the Commission, which was established by House Resolution 1, implements a key recommendation of the independent, bipartisan 9/11 Commission to address the grave threat that the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction poses to our country. The Commission assessed the nation's current activities, initiatives, and programs aimed at preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and terrorism and provided key recommendations.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An unholy alliance: Case studies in narco-terrorism

An unholy alliance: Case studies in narco-terrorism

Date: August 2002
Creator: Cakir, Reha
Description: This study is designed both as a case study and a literature-based policy analysis to assist interested parties in gaining a better understanding of controversial “narco-terrorism” phenomenon. The objectives of this study are to show the existing connection between some terrorist organizations and drug trafficking to provide academic information about and explanations for terrorism and drug trafficking, to critically analyze the biases of many current narco-terrorism doctrines and to offer a comprehensive and neutral typology that elucidates all types of narco-terrorism. This thesis is presented in four parts. The first part includes an introduction to narco-terrorism and provides a historical background of drug dilemma and terrorism. A number of definitional and conceptual arguments constituting the backbone of the study are laid out in the second part of the study. Third part consists of case studies of three different insurgent groups. An analysis of the information uncovered and presented in previous chapters and a typology of narco-terrorism are provided in the last part. Thesis is concluded with recommendations in an attempt to inspire useful policies for individuals or institutions operating on the field.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The North Texan, Volume 51, Number 4, Winter 2001

The North Texan, Volume 51, Number 4, Winter 2001

Date: Winter 2001
Creator: University of North Texas
Description: The North Texan magazine includes articles and notes about the University of North Texas students, faculty, and alumni activities.
Contributing Partner: University Relations, Communications & Marketing department for UNT
Causes of Terrorism: A Socioeconomic Analysis - A Work in Progress

Causes of Terrorism: A Socioeconomic Analysis - A Work in Progress

Date: April 3, 2008
Creator: Pascoe, Henry & Books, John
Description: Poster presented at the 2008 University Scholars Day at UNT. This poster discusses research on the causes of terrorism and an analysis of how socioeconomic conditions of the Middle East cause individuals to be recruited into terrorist organizations and participate in terrorist activities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
New Reality Resembles Old: An Examination of the American Public's Social Construction of Reality Following September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks

New Reality Resembles Old: An Examination of the American Public's Social Construction of Reality Following September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks

Date: May 2004
Creator: Stoutmeyer, Stacie L.
Description: This thesis examines whether the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks caused a significant, lasting change in the American public's social construction of reality. A framework of everyday reality was created which focused on beliefs, behaviors, and cultural institutions in the United States. Data regarding specific beliefs and behaviors was collected from numerous survey sources, and content analysis was performed on media literature from September 11, 2001 to September 11, 2003. Findings from this study show that beliefs examined did change, while behaviors on similar topics did not. These finding represents an interesting paradox to be evaluated in future studies. Cultural institutions, as related to the public's knowledge of and relationship with each, also appeared little changed. Therefore, while some aspects displayed adjustment, this study cannot conclusively state that American public's social construction of reality experienced a "new reality" paradigm shift as proclaimed by the media immediately following the attacks.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Challenges encountered during law enforcement investigations of terrorist use of information technology.

Challenges encountered during law enforcement investigations of terrorist use of information technology.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2005
Creator: Morgan, Deanne
Description: The late 20th and early 21st centuries have seen a phenomenal growth in society's use of information technology. Criminals, including terrorists and terrorist organizations, have also adopted information technologies. Information technologies are used to enhance the efficiency, productivity, and effectiveness of terrorist activities and offenses. Investigating terrorist use of information technologies creates a number of challenges for law enforcement officials. While some of the challenges are encountered during conventional criminal investigations, terrorist investigations also present unique challenges. Through content and typological analysis, this study examined open source information to identify, categorize and propose a model of these challenges. Four primary categories were identified: technology, methodology, legal, and administration and human resources challenges.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory, Volume 22, Number 1, Winter 2002

JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory, Volume 22, Number 1, Winter 2002

Date: 2002
Creator: Association of Teachers of Advanced Composition (U.S.)
Description: JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory contains a collection of papers regarding writing and rhetoric: "The JAC is a forum for theory, research and pedagogy regarding (1) those writing courses beyond the freshman courses, excluding technical and creative writing, (2) writing in courses which are not themselves writing courses, particularly in the liberal arts and sciences, and (3) work in theory, research or pedagogy which is advanced or progressive and will shed light on the field as a whole while at the same time providing insights for advanced composition" (volume 1, number 1).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Needs and Membership in Terrorist Organizations

Needs and Membership in Terrorist Organizations

Date: December 2009
Creator: Ekici, Siddik
Description: One key to reducing terrorism may be to understand why individuals join terror groups, and to find ways to meet their needs through alternatives to discourage membership in terrorist organizations. The study introduces the hierarchy of needs framework to capture all previous pieces of explanations on why individuals join terror groups under one big umbrella, in order to see the big picture. It does not do a meta-analysis, but rather tests the framework. This study is designed to find out what perceived needs commonly motivate individuals to join terror groups in general and specific terror groups in particular. The research uses Turkey's terrorism experience as a case study which is supported with data from real terrorist in Turkey. Findings of the descriptive analyses show that majority joined a terror group due to social and affiliative needs. The remaining analyses (bivariate, cross-tabulation and binary logistic regression) show that confitents who perceived esteem and recognition were more likely to become members of other/leftist terror groups, and that rightist terror group members in Turkey tend to have higher education. Education mainly affects a confitent's perception of two needs: social and affiliation and self-actualization. Other demographic variables (age group, region of birth, marital status) ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Terrorism as a social information entity: A model for early intervention.

Terrorism as a social information entity: A model for early intervention.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2005
Creator: Yayla, Ahmet
Description: This dissertation studies different social aspects of terrorists and terrorist organizations in an effort to better deal with terrorism, especially in the long run. The researcher, who also worked as a Police Captain at Turkish National Police Anti-Terrorism Department, seeks solutions to today's global problem by studying both literature and a Delphi examination of a survey of 1070 imprisoned terrorists. The research questions include questions such as "What are the reasons behind terrorism?", "Why does terrorism occur?", "What ideologies provide the framework for terrorist violence?, "Why do some individuals become terrorists and others do not?" and "Under what conditions will terrorists end their violence?" The results of the study presents the complexity of the terrorism problem as a social experience and impossibility of a single solution or remedy for the global problem of terrorism. The researcher through his examination of the findings of the data, presented that terrorism is a social phenomenon with criminal consequences that needs to be dealt by means of two dimensional approaches. The first is the social dimension of terrorism and the second is the criminal dimension of terrorism. Based on this, the researcher constructed a conceptual model which addresses both of these dimensions under the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Homeland Security Roles and Responsibilities: an Examination of Texas Police Chiefs’ Perceptions

Homeland Security Roles and Responsibilities: an Examination of Texas Police Chiefs’ Perceptions

Date: August 2012
Creator: Thimamontri, Apinya
Description: Research has shown that the police industry has entered into an era of homeland security. However, whether the core functions of policing have significantly changed since September 11, 2001, has been the topic of considerable debate. Using secondary data, the research identifies variables that are most influential in predicting whether Texas police chiefs understand their departments’ homeland security roles and responsibilities. The data was originally obtained in 2007 through self-administered surveys of police chiefs attending the Texas Chief Leadership Series (TPCLS) and the New Chief Development Program (NCDP).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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