Hopfield Networks as an Error Correcting Technique for Speech Recognition

Hopfield Networks as an Error Correcting Technique for Speech Recognition

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Date: May 2004
Creator: Bireddy, Chakradhar
Description: I experimented with Hopfield networks in the context of a voice-based, query-answering system. Hopfield networks are used to store and retrieve patterns. I used this technique to store queries represented as natural language sentences and I evaluated the accuracy of the technique for error correction in a spoken question-answering dialog between a computer and a user. I show that the use of an auto-associative Hopfield network helps make the speech recognition system more fault tolerant. I also looked at the available encoding schemes to convert a natural language sentence into a pattern of zeroes and ones that can be stored in the Hopfield network reliably, and I suggest scalable data representations which allow storing a large number of queries.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Can You Hear Me Now? Benefits of Frequency-Modulated (FM) Systems for Adults and Children Using Cochlear Implants: A Meta-Analysis Approach

Can You Hear Me Now? Benefits of Frequency-Modulated (FM) Systems for Adults and Children Using Cochlear Implants: A Meta-Analysis Approach

Date: March 29, 2007
Creator: Kleineck, Mary Pat & Schafer, Erin
Description: This presentation discusses a research study on the benefits of frequency-modulated (FM) systems for adults and children using cochlear implants.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Can You Hear Me Now: A Meta-Analytical Perspective of the Benefits of Frequency-Modulated (FM) Systems for People with Cochlear Implants

Can You Hear Me Now: A Meta-Analytical Perspective of the Benefits of Frequency-Modulated (FM) Systems for People with Cochlear Implants

Date: March 29, 2007
Creator: Kleineck, Mary Pat & Schafer, Erin
Description: This paper discusses a research study on the benefits of frequency-modulated (FM) systems for adults and children using cochlear implants.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College