Hopfield Networks as an Error Correcting Technique for Speech Recognition

Hopfield Networks as an Error Correcting Technique for Speech Recognition

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Date: May 2004
Creator: Bireddy, Chakradhar
Description: I experimented with Hopfield networks in the context of a voice-based, query-answering system. Hopfield networks are used to store and retrieve patterns. I used this technique to store queries represented as natural language sentences and I evaluated the accuracy of the technique for error correction in a spoken question-answering dialog between a computer and a user. I show that the use of an auto-associative Hopfield network helps make the speech recognition system more fault tolerant. I also looked at the available encoding schemes to convert a natural language sentence into a pattern of zeroes and ones that can be stored in the Hopfield network reliably, and I suggest scalable data representations which allow storing a large number of queries.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effectiveness of Speech Recognition as a User Interface for Computer-Based Training

The Effectiveness of Speech Recognition as a User Interface for Computer-Based Training

Date: August 1995
Creator: Creech, Wayne E. (Wayne Everette)
Description: Some researchers are saying that natural language is probably one of the most promising interfaces for use in the long term for simplicity of learning. If this is true, then it follows that speech recognition would be ideal as the interface for computer-based training (CBT). While many speech recognition applications are being used as a means for a computer interface, these are usually confined to controlling the computer or causing the computer to control other devices. The user input or interface has been the recipient of a strong effort to improve the quality of the communication between man and machine and is proposed to be a dominant factor in determining user productivity, performance, and satisfaction. However, other researchers note that full natural interfaces with computers are still a long way from being the state-of-the art with technology. The focus of this study was to determine if the technology of speech recognition is an effective interface for an academic lesson presented via CBT. How does one determine if learning has been affected and how is this measured? Previous research has attempted quantify a learning effect when using a variety of interfaces. This dissertation summarizes previous studies using other interfaces and those ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Can You Hear Me Now: A Meta-Analytical Perspective of the Benefits of Frequency-Modulated (FM) Systems for People with Cochlear Implants

Can You Hear Me Now: A Meta-Analytical Perspective of the Benefits of Frequency-Modulated (FM) Systems for People with Cochlear Implants

Date: March 29, 2007
Creator: Kleineck, Mary Pat & Schafer, Erin
Description: This paper discusses a research study on the benefits of frequency-modulated (FM) systems for adults and children using cochlear implants.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Can You Hear Me Now? Benefits of Frequency-Modulated (FM) Systems for Adults and Children Using Cochlear Implants: A Meta-Analysis Approach [Presentation]

Can You Hear Me Now? Benefits of Frequency-Modulated (FM) Systems for Adults and Children Using Cochlear Implants: A Meta-Analysis Approach [Presentation]

Date: March 29, 2007
Creator: Kleineck, Mary Pat & Schafer, Erin
Description: Presentation for the 2007 University Scholars Day at the University of North Texas discussing research on the benefits of frequency-modulated (FM) systems for adults and children using cochlear implants.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College