Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Marseille Moon

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Marseille Moon

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Moon, Marseille
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Marseille Moon.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Empowering Digital Libraries Users through Combining Taxonomies with Folksonomies

Empowering Digital Libraries Users through Combining Taxonomies with Folksonomies

Date: October 2012
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw & Rorissa, Abebe
Description: This paper accompanies a poster presentation discussing empowering digital libraries users through combining taxonomies and folksonomies.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Social Networking, Workplace, and Entertainment Literacies: the Out-of-school Literate Lives of Newcomer Latina/o Adolescents

Social Networking, Workplace, and Entertainment Literacies: the Out-of-school Literate Lives of Newcomer Latina/o Adolescents

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2012
Creator: Stewart, Mary Amanda
Description: Studies indicate that Latina/o immigrant youth engage in a wide range of sophisticated literacy practices outside of school that are often transnational, crossing various linguistic, cultural, and social spaces. Technology has further afforded immigrant youth the opportunity to develop transnational capabilities which are rare in the mainstream population, yet needed in the 21st century of global connectedness. However, Latino immigrant youth drop out of school at disproportional rates, suggesting that their literacy practices are not recognized or valued by the educational system. Using a New Literacy Studies perspective that recognizes multiple literacies that are meaningful within their sociocultural traditions, this collective case study investigated the range, form, and purpose of the out-of-school literacies of four Latina/o adolescent English Learners who are new arrivals. The qualitative methodology employed constructivist interviews, digital and actual artifacts, and observations. Findings demonstrated that the most prevalent out-of-school literacies the participants practice take place on the social networking site of Facebook, in their workplaces, and through the entertainment media sources of music and television. A cross-case analysis suggests that the literacy practices in these spaces have unique and purposeful roles for the individuals that allow them to connect to their home countries and maintain their Latina/o ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries