Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Madeleine Fitzgerald

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Madeleine Fitzgerald

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Fitzgerald, Madeleine
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Madeleine Fitzgerald.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
The Evolution of Gentility in Eighteenth-Century England and Colonial Virginia

The Evolution of Gentility in Eighteenth-Century England and Colonial Virginia

Date: August 2000
Creator: Nitcholas, Mark C.
Description: This study analyzes the impact of eighteenth-century commercialization on the evolution of the English and southern American landed classes with regard to three genteel leadership qualities--education, vocation, and personal characteristics. A simultaneous comparison provides a clearer view of how each adapted, or failed to adapt, to the social and economic change of the period. The analysis demonstrates that the English gentry did not lose a class struggle with the commercial ranks as much as they were overwhelmed by economic changes they could not understand. The southern landed class established an economy based on production of cash crops and thus adapted better to a commercial economy. The work addresses the development of class-consciousness in England and the origins of Virginia's landed class.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Sound Basis for Interaction among Community Agencies

A Sound Basis for Interaction among Community Agencies

Date: 1951
Creator: King, Robert Ray
Description: The purpose of this study is (1) to determine the need for a creative program of interaction among the various community agencies, and (2) to determine the sound processes to be used in bringing about desirable social change through interaction among the agencies. Improving social conditions that affect the welfare of youth in the community is the primary concern of this study.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries