The South and the Mexican War

The South and the Mexican War

Date: December 1970
Creator: Lowe, Billie Lynne Owens
Description: This thesis examines newspapers and correspondence of public men in the era of the Mexican war to provide some answers to pertinent questions regarding the South's role in the Mexican War. It attempts to reveal to some degree whether Southerners uniformly supported the war, whether their support arose from an expansionist sentiment or a desire to extend the area of slavery, whether any strong opposition to the war existed in the South, and why they supported or opposed it.
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Slavery, Fear, and Disunion in the Lone Star State: Texans' Attitudes toward Secession and the Union, 1846-1861

Slavery, Fear, and Disunion in the Lone Star State: Texans' Attitudes toward Secession and the Union, 1846-1861

Date: August 1972
Creator: Ledbetter, Billy D.
Description: This work is a study of white Texans' attitudes toward their role in the federal Union and their right to secede from it during the antebellum period. The central question of the study is why did people so strongly Unionist in 1846 became so strongly secessionist by 1861. In tracing this significant shift in Texans' sentiment, the author especially emphasizes the racial attitudes of white Texans, their emotional defense of the institution of slavery, and their strong conviction that the Negroes, if emancipated, would destroy white society. Of special importance to this study is the relationship of Texans' racial attitudes to their attitudes toward the Union.
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Henry Clay and the Peculiar Institution

Henry Clay and the Peculiar Institution

Date: December 1971
Creator: Boeding, Michael Alexander
Description: The major concern of this study is an attempt to analyze the attitudes.of Henry Clay, United States Congressman and Senator from Kentucky, 1807-1852, and three time presidential candidate, concerning the institution of slavery by examining its effects upon his political career from 1798 to 1850. The major conclusions of this study are that early in his life Clay made an intellectual commitment that slavery was wrong and maintained this abstract view of the institution until his death. However, Clay never took an active stand against slavery for three reasons: he believed that an antislavery stand would destroy his political career; he realized the explosiveness of the slavery issue as early as 1799, and his misguided love for the Union forced him to attempt to suppress the issue; and Clay was a racist who did not wish to see the United States populated with a sizable number of free blacks.
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American Interests in the Cuban Revolt, 1868-1878

American Interests in the Cuban Revolt, 1868-1878

Date: August 1954
Creator: Watkins, Holland Dempsey
Description: This thesis describes the Cuban revolt of 1868-1878 and the interest it caused in the United States.
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John Quincy Adams and Slavery

John Quincy Adams and Slavery

Date: August 1973
Creator: Rosendahl, Nancy Diane Boydston
Description: The purpose of this thesis is to provide for the reader an isolated study based on a thorough research of the Adams Papers, Congressional Globe, and American Foreign Relations Papers, of Adams' views on slavery, both legal and moral.
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Martin Van Buren and Slavery

Martin Van Buren and Slavery

Date: December 1972
Creator: Waters, Philo Wayne
Description: The main objective of this study is to determine Martin Van Buren's views on slavery and the influence of the institution on his public career.
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Unionism in Texas: 1860-1867

Unionism in Texas: 1860-1867

Date: January 1954
Creator: Haynes, Billy Dwayne
Description: This thesis studies the issue of unionism in Texas during the era of the Civil War.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Slavery and the Federalist Party, 1789-1808

Slavery and the Federalist Party, 1789-1808

Date: August 1966
Creator: Smith, Stewart D.
Description: The growth of antislavery sentiment during this era had origins traceable to several aspects of life in revolutionary America. The two most important were the philosophical basis of the revolution and the evolving economic situation, both of which worked together to destroy slavery in the northern and middle states and to restrict it in the South.
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Economic Mobility into the Planter Class in Texas, 1846-1860

Economic Mobility into the Planter Class in Texas, 1846-1860

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2011
Creator: Nelson, Robert Nicholas
Description: This study examines upward economic mobility into the planter class in Texas during the antebellum statehood period, 1846-1860. Using quantitative methods to analyze data from census and tax records, this study addresses several questions regarding the property owning experience of Texas planters. Did any of the 1860 planters, men or women, rise to that status from another class? If so, how many rose from small slaveholder or small planter origins, and how many advanced from plain folk origins? In what ways did the amount and nature of wealth of these individuals change in the period studied? In what ways do these findings provide insights into the debate over planter dominance versus ‘plain folk’ inclusive herrenvolk democracy and the relationship between the planters and the other classes? Did the experiences of female planters differ from that of male planters? Did female planter experiences in Texas differ from female planters in other parts of the Old South? The results of these questions demonstrate that economic class mobility into the richest class was significant but limited and that women’s experiences were closely tied to those of male kin.
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Creole Angel: The Self-Identity of the Free People of Color of Antebellum New Orleans

Creole Angel: The Self-Identity of the Free People of Color of Antebellum New Orleans

Date: August 2006
Creator: Hobratsch, Ben Melvin
Description: This thesis is about the self-identity of antebellum New Orleans's free people of color. The emphasis of this work is that French culture, mixed Gallic and African ancestry, and freedom from slavery served as the three keys to the identity of this class of people. Taken together, these three factors separated the free people of color from the other major groups residing in New Orleans - Anglo-Americans, white Creoles and black slaves. The introduction provides an overview of the topic and states the need for this study. Chapter 1 provides a look at New Orleans from the perspective of the free people of color. Chapter 2 investigates the slaveownership of these people. Chapter 3 examines the published literature of the free people of color. The conclusion summarizes the significance found in the preceding three chapters and puts their findings into a broader interpretive framework.
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