Exploring Privacy in Location-based Services Using Cryptographic Protocols

Exploring Privacy in Location-based Services Using Cryptographic Protocols

Date: May 2011
Creator: Vishwanathan, Roopa
Description: Location-based services (LBS) are available on a variety of mobile platforms like cell phones, PDA's, etc. and an increasing number of users subscribe to and use these services. Two of the popular models of information flow in LBS are the client-server model and the peer-to-peer model, in both of which, existing approaches do not always provide privacy for all parties concerned. In this work, I study the feasibility of applying cryptographic protocols to design privacy-preserving solutions for LBS from an experimental and theoretical standpoint. In the client-server model, I construct a two-phase framework for processing nearest neighbor queries using combinations of cryptographic protocols such as oblivious transfer and private information retrieval. In the peer-to-peer model, I present privacy preserving solutions for processing group nearest neighbor queries in the semi-honest and dishonest adversarial models. I apply concepts from secure multi-party computation to realize our constructions and also leverage the capabilities of trusted computing technology, specifically TPM chips. My solution for the dishonest adversarial model is also of independent cryptographic interest. I prove my constructions secure under standard cryptographic assumptions and design experiments for testing the feasibility or practicability of our constructions and benchmark key operations. My experiments show that the proposed ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Privacy: Government Use of Data from Information Resellers Could Include Better Protections

Privacy: Government Use of Data from Information Resellers Could Include Better Protections

Date: March 11, 2008
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Federal agencies collect and use personal information for various purposes from information resellers--companies that amass and sell data from many sources. GAO was asked to testify on its April 2006 report on agency use of reseller data. For that report, GAO was asked to determine how the Departments of Justice, Homeland Security, and State and the Social Security Administration used personal data from resellers and to review the extent to which agencies' policies and practices for handling this information reflected the Fair Information Practices, a set of widely accepted principles for protecting the privacy and security of personal data. GAO was also asked to provide an update on the implementation status of its recommendations and to comment on provisions of the proposed Federal Agency Data Protection Act. In preparing this testimony, GAO relied primarily on its April 2006 report."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Privacy: Congress Should Consider Alternatives for Strengthening Protection of Personally Identifiable Information

Privacy: Congress Should Consider Alternatives for Strengthening Protection of Personally Identifiable Information

Date: June 18, 2008
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Concerns have been raised about the privacy and security of personal information in light of advances in information technology and the increasingly sophisticated ways in which the government obtains and uses information. Federal agencies' use of personal information is governed by the Privacy Act of 1974 and the E-Government Act of 2002, while the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provides implementation guidance and oversight. These laws and guidance are based on the Fair Information Practices, a set of widely accepted principles for protecting privacy. GAO was asked to testify on its report, being released today, concerning the sufficiency of privacy protections afforded by existing laws and guidance. To do this, GAO analyzed privacy laws and guidance, compared them with the Fair Information Practices, and obtained perspectives from federal agencies as well as an expert forum."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Privacy: Preventing and Responding to Improper Disclosures of Personal Information

Privacy: Preventing and Responding to Improper Disclosures of Personal Information

Date: June 8, 2006
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The recent security breach at the Department of Veterans Affairs, in which personal data on millions of veterans were compromised, has highlighted the importance of the federal government's processes for protecting personal information. As the federal government obtains and processes information about individuals in increasingly diverse ways, it remains critically important that it properly protect this information and respect the privacy rights of individuals. GAO was asked to testify on preventing and responding to improper disclosures of personal information in the federal government, including how agencies should notify individuals and the public when breaches occur. In preparing this testimony, GAO drew on its previous reports and testimonies, as well as on expert opinion provided in congressional testimony and other sources."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Privacy: Agencies Should Ensure That Designated Senior Officials Have Oversight of Key Functions

Privacy: Agencies Should Ensure That Designated Senior Officials Have Oversight of Key Functions

Date: May 30, 2008
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Government agencies have a long-standing obligation under the Privacy Act of 1974 to protect the privacy of individuals about whom they collect personal information. A number of additional laws have been enacted in recent years directing agency heads to designate senior officials as focal points with overall responsibility for privacy. GAO was asked to (1) describe laws and guidance that set requirements for senior privacy officials within federal agencies, and (2) describe the organizational structures used by agencies to address privacy requirements and assess whether senior officials have oversight over key functions. To achieve these objectives, GAO analyzed the laws and related guidance and analyzed policies and procedures relating to key privacy functions at 12 agencies."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Next Generation of Creative Commons Licenses, What's New in CC 4.0

The Next Generation of Creative Commons Licenses, What's New in CC 4.0

Date: April 16, 2014
Creator: Helge, Kris
Description: This Tech Talk presentation discusses the next generation of Creative Commons (CC) licenses and what is new in CC 4.0.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Copyright and Social Media

Copyright and Social Media

Date: April 2, 2014
Creator: Helge, Kris & McKinnon, Laura F.
Description: Presentation for the Oklahoma Library Association on copyright and social media.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Study of the Intent to Fully Utilize Electronic Personal Health Records in the Context of Privacy and Trust

A Study of the Intent to Fully Utilize Electronic Personal Health Records in the Context of Privacy and Trust

Date: May 2012
Creator: Richards, Rhonda J.
Description: Government initiatives called for electronic health records for each individual healthcare consumer by 2014. the purpose of the initiatives is to provide for the common exchange of clinical information between healthcare consumers, healthcare providers, third-party payers and public healthcare officials.This exchange of healthcare information will impact the healthcare industry and enable more effective and efficient application of healthcare so that there may be a decrease in medical errors, increase in access to quality of care tools, and enhancement of decision making abilities by healthcare consumers, healthcare providers and government health agencies. an electronic personal health record (ePHR) created, managed and accessed by healthcare consumers may be the answer to fulfilling the national initiative. However, since healthcare consumers potentially are in control of their own ePHR, the healthcare consumer’s concern for privacy may be a barrier for the effective implementation of a nationwide network of ePHR. a technology acceptance model, an information boundary theory model and a trust model were integrated to analyze usage intentions of healthcare consumers of ePHR. Results indicate that healthcare consumers feel there is a perceived usefulness of ePHR; however they may not see ePHR as easy to use. Results also indicate that the perceived usefulness of ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Privacy Concerns and Personality Traits Influencing Online Behavior: A Structural Model

Privacy Concerns and Personality Traits Influencing Online Behavior: A Structural Model

Date: May 2005
Creator: Grams, Brian C.
Description: The concept of privacy has proven difficult to analyze because of its subjective nature and susceptibility to psychological and contextual influences. This study challenges the concept of privacy as a valid construct for addressing individuals' concerns regarding online disclosure of personal information, based on the premise that underlying behavioral traits offer a more reliable and temporally stable measure of privacy-oriented behavior than do snapshots of environmentally induced emotional states typically measured by opinion polls. This study investigated the relationship of personality characteristics associated with individuals' general privacy-related behavior to their online privacy behaviors and concerns. Two latent constructs, Functional Privacy Orientation and Online Privacy Orientation, were formulated. Functional Privacy Orientation is defined as a general measure of individuals' perception of control over their privacy. It was measured using the factors General Disclosiveness, Locus of Control, Generalized Trust, Risk Orientation, and Risk Propensity as indicator variables. Online Privacy Orientation is defined as a measure of individuals' perception of control over their privacy in an online environment. It was measured using the factors Willingness to Disclose Online, Level of Privacy Concern, Information Management Privacy Concerns, and Reported Online Disclosure as indicator variables. A survey questionnaire that included two new instruments to measure ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Privacy: Lessons Learned about Data Breach Notification

Privacy: Lessons Learned about Data Breach Notification

Date: April 30, 2007
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "A May 2006 data breach at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and other similar incidents since then have heightened awareness of the importance of protecting computer equipment containing personally identifiable information and responding effectively to a breach that poses privacy risks. GAO's objective was to identify lessons learned from the VA data breach and other similar federal data breaches regarding effectively notifying government officials and affected individuals about data breaches. To address this objective, GAO analyzed documentation and interviewed officials at VA and five other agencies regarding their responses to data breaches and their progress in implementing standardized data breach notification procedures. The cases at the other agencies were chosen because, like the VA case, they involved loss or theft of computing equipment and relatively large numbers of affected individuals (10,000 or more)."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Privacy: OPM Should Better Monitor Implementation of Privacy-Related Policies and Procedures for Background Investigations

Privacy: OPM Should Better Monitor Implementation of Privacy-Related Policies and Procedures for Background Investigations

Date: September 7, 2010
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Approximately 90 percent of all federal background investigations are provided by the Office of Personnel Management's (OPM) Federal Investigative Services (FIS) division. In fiscal year 2009, FIS conducted over 2 million investigations of varying types, making the organization a major steward of personal information on U.S. citizens. GAO was asked to (1) describe how OPM uses personally identifiable information (PII) in conducting background investigations and (2) assess the extent to which OPM's privacy policies and procedures for protecting PII related to investigations meet statutory requirements and align with widely accepted privacy practices. To address these objectives, GAO compared OPM and FIS policies and procedures with key privacy laws and widely accepted practices."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Commission on Systemic Interoperability

Commission on Systemic Interoperability

Date: 2005
Creator: Commission on Systemic Interoperability
Description: The Commission on Systemic Interoperability was authorized by the Medicare Modernization Act and established by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Its members were appointed by the President of the United States of America and the leaders of the 108th United States Congress, and it held its first meeting on January 10, 2005.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Privacy: Alternatives Exist for Enhancing Protection of Personally Identifiable Information

Privacy: Alternatives Exist for Enhancing Protection of Personally Identifiable Information

Date: May 19, 2008
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The centerpiece of the federal government's legal framework for privacy protection, the Privacy Act of 1974, provides safeguards for information maintained by federal agencies. In addition, the E-Government Act of 2002 requires federal agencies to conduct privacy impact assessments for systems or collections containing personal information. GAO was asked to determine whether laws and guidance consistently cover the federal government's collection and use of personal information and incorporate key privacy principles. GAO was also asked, in doing so, to identify options for addressing these issues. To achieve these objectives, GAO analyzed the laws and related guidance, obtained an operational perspective from federal agencies, and consulted an expert panel convened by the National Academy of Sciences."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Privacy: Domestic and Offshore Outsourcing of Personal Information in Medicare, Medicaid, and TRICARE

Privacy: Domestic and Offshore Outsourcing of Personal Information in Medicare, Medicaid, and TRICARE

Date: September 5, 2006
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Description: A letter report issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Federal contractors and state Medicaid agencies are responsible for the day-to-day operations of the Medicare, Medicaid, and TRICARE programs. Because these entities may contract with vendors to perform services involving the use of personal health data, outsourcing and privacy protections are of interest. GAO surveyed all federal Medicare and TRICARE contractors and all state Medicaid agencies (a combined total of 378 entities) to examine whether they (1) outsource services--domestically or offshore--and (2) must notify federal agencies when privacy breaches occur. Survey response rates ranged from 69 percent for Medicare Advantage contractors to 80 percent for Medicaid agencies. GAO interviewed officials at the Department of Health and Human Services' Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), which oversees Medicare and Medicaid, and the Department of Defense's TRICARE Management Activity (TMA), which oversees TRICARE."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Privacy: Federal Law Should Be Updated to Address Changing Technology Landscape

Privacy: Federal Law Should Be Updated to Address Changing Technology Landscape

Date: July 31, 2012
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Technological developments since the Privacy Act became law in 1974 have changed the way information is organized and shared among organizations and individuals. Such advances have rendered some of the provisions of the Privacy Act and the E-Government Act of 2002 inadequate to fully protect all personally identifiable information collected, used, and maintained by the federal government. For example, GAO has reported on challenges in protecting the privacy of personal information relative to agencies’ use of Web 2.0 and data-mining technologies."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Privacy: Key Challenges Facing Federal Agencies

Privacy: Key Challenges Facing Federal Agencies

Date: May 17, 2006
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Advances in information technology make it easier than ever for the federal government to obtain and process personal information about citizens and residents in many ways and for many purposes. To ensure that the privacy rights of individuals are respected, this information must be properly protected in accordance with current law, particularly the Privacy Act and the E-Government Act of 2002. These laws prescribe specific activities that agencies must perform to protect privacy, and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has developed guidance on how and in what circumstances agencies are to carry out these activities. Many agencies designate officials as focal points for privacy-related matters, and increasingly, many have created senior positions, such as chief privacy officer, to assume primary responsibility for privacy policy, as well as dedicated privacy offices. GAO was asked to testify on key challenges facing agency privacy officers. To address this issue, GAO identified and summarized issues raised in its previous reports on privacy."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
ReSource, Volume 1, Number 1, [1984]

ReSource, Volume 1, Number 1, [1984]

Date: 1984
Creator: North Texas State University
Description: ReSource magazine includes articles and notes about research at North Texas State University in various academic fields.
Contributing Partner: University Relations, Communications & Marketing department for UNT
The Burner Project: Privacy and Social Control in a Networked World

The Burner Project: Privacy and Social Control in a Networked World

Date: May 2015
Creator: Shade, Molly
Description: As mobile phones become increasingly ubiquitous in today’s world, academic and public audiences alike are curious about the interaction between mobile technologies and social norms. To investigate this phenomenon, I examined how individuals use technology to actively manage their communication behaviors. Through a three-month research project on usage patterns of Burner, a mobile application, this thesis explores the relationships among technology, culture, and privacy. Burner is a service that equips individuals with the means to create, maintain, and/or dissolve social ties by providing temporary, disposable numbers to customers. The application offers a way to communicate without relying on a user’s personal phone number. In other words, Burner acts as a “privacy layer” for mobile phones. It also provides a valuable platform to examine how customers use the application as a strategy for communication management. This thesis represents a marriage of practice and theory: (1) As an applied enterprise, the project was constructed as a customer needs assessment intending to examine how the service was situated in the lives of its users. The findings have successfully been applied to my client’s company strategy and have led to a more informed customer approach. (2) As an academic endeavor, this research contributes to ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Space in Space: Privacy Needs for Long-Duration Spaceflight

Space in Space: Privacy Needs for Long-Duration Spaceflight

Date: May 2014
Creator: Aiken, Jo
Description: Space exploration is a uniquely human activity. As humans continue to push the limits of exploring the unknown, they have sought knowledge supporting the sustenance of life in outer space. New technologies, advancements in medicine, and rethinking what it means to be a “community” will need to emerge to support life among the stars. Crews traveling beyond the Moon will rely on the development of new technologies to support the technological aspects of their missions as well as their quality of life while away from Earth. Likewise, through advancements in medicine, scientists will need to address remaining questions regarding the effects of long-duration spaceflight on the human body and crew performance. Space explorers must learn to utilize these new technologies and medical advancements while learning to adapt to their new environment in space and as a space community. It is important that researchers address these issues so that human survival beyond Earth is not only achievable but so that life among the stars is worth living and sustaining. This thesis addressed these issues in an attempt to extend the trajectory of space exploration to new horizons.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries