Social Attitudes toward Men and Women with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Social Attitudes toward Men and Women with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Date: August 2002
Creator: Mendelsohn, Michaela
Description: Although men are more likely to experience traumatic events, the risk of developing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder is at least twice as high in women than in men after exposure to comparable traumas. These findings are more consistent in response to some types of trauma (e.g., assaultive violence) than others (e.g., natural disaster). There has been very little systematic study of the sources of these gender differences. This study began to explore the contribution of gender-related beliefs about appropriate responses to trauma by investigating the impact of victim sex and trauma type as well as participant sex, sex-role orientation, and personal trauma history on attitudes towards victims. Ninety-three male and 179 female students were administered the Bem Sex Role Inventory, the Trauma History Questionnaire, and a vignette measure of attitudes towards victims. Participants evaluated male victims significantly less favorably than female victims, and females had more positive attitudes towards victims than males. Feminine sex-typed and androgynous women rated victims more favorably than masculine sex-typed men and women. The interaction between sex of victim and trauma type was not significant. A positive relation was observed between personal trauma exposure and attitudes towards male victims among male participants only. These findings contribute towards ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Guilt and Shame as They Relate to Combat Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): An Analysis of Trauma Content And Resulting Symptomatology

Guilt and Shame as They Relate to Combat Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): An Analysis of Trauma Content And Resulting Symptomatology

Date: May 2001
Creator: Taber, Iris
Description: This study began testing the Sewell and Williams (in press) model that differing trauma types yield differing presentations in social versus event processing domains. Other hypotheses explored trauma type with levels of guilt, and shame-proneness with anxiety. Volunteers were 44 male combat veterans being treated for PTSD. Data analyses determined whether trauma type related to guilt and perceived social support and whether shame-proneness related to levels of anxiety. High shame persons may process anxiety and social support differently than low shame persons. Results can assist professionals understand how a person's functioning is affected by certain types of trauma. Future research should focus on increasing social support for persons who have experienced trauma.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): What is it and what causes it?

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): What is it and what causes it?

Date: November 15, 2012
Creator: Boals, Adriel
Description: This presentation is part of the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on Coming Home. The author has a grant from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) on innovative approaches to understanding and treating PTSD. In this presentation, the author discusses PTSD and other responses to trauma and stress.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Posttraumatic Growth: Behavioral, Cognitive, and Demographic Predictors

Posttraumatic Growth: Behavioral, Cognitive, and Demographic Predictors

Date: August 2011
Creator: Schuettler, Darnell
Description: Recent trauma research argues trauma results in distinct positive and negative consequences, however; many trauma variables positively correlate with both outcomes. This study examined posttraumatic growth (PTG) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms as positive and negative trauma outcomes. Behavioral, cognitive, and demographic correlates and predictors were assessed to help clarify differences between the two outcomes. While several behavioral factors were common to both PTG and PTSD symptoms, centrality of event and problem focused coping were the strongest PTG predictors, whereas centrality of event and avoidant coping were the strongest PTSD predictors. These findings indicate while greater incorporation of a trauma/stressful event into one’s identity is a key component of both PTG and PTSD development, behavioral response may be a determining factor between growth or debilitation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
UNT Speaks Out On Coming Home

UNT Speaks Out On Coming Home

Date: November 15, 2012
Creator: University of North Texas. Libraries.
Description: This video recording is of the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on Coming Home. This series features presentations by Dr. Shelley Riggs, Dr. Adriel Boals, and Doctoral Student Cindy Hasio. Dr. Shelley Riggs is a professor of psychology, director of the Family Attachment Lab, and is conducting the Student Veteran Research Project at the University of North Texas (UNT). She discusses the family relationships of veterans after deployment. Dr. Adriel Boals is professor of psychology and has a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to study innovative approaches to understanding and treating Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other responses to trauma and stress. He discusses what PTSD is and what causes it. Cindy Hasio is a doctoral student in the College of Visual Arts and Design. She discusses methods and findings from a project she participated in related to how veterans narrated their experiences through art. Her component of the study evaluated participants and described what they gained through creating arts and crafts. Stuart Presley, Domingo Rodriguez, and James Rumor are a panel of three student veterans who describe their experiences after deployment.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Memory in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Properties of voluntary and involuntary, traumatic and non-traumatic autobiographical memories in people with and without PTSD symptoms

Memory in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Properties of voluntary and involuntary, traumatic and non-traumatic autobiographical memories in people with and without PTSD symptoms

Date: November 2008
Creator: Rubin, David C.; Boals, Adriel & Berntsen, Dorthe, 1962-
Description: Article on memory in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the properties of voluntary and involuntary, traumatic and non-traumatic autobiographical memories in people with and without PTSD symptoms.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
The Integration of Emotions in Memories: Cognitive-Emotional Distinctiveness and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

The Integration of Emotions in Memories: Cognitive-Emotional Distinctiveness and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Date: October 21, 2010
Creator: Boals, Adriel & Rubin, David C.
Description: Article on the integration of emotions in memories and cognitive-emotional distinctiveness and posttraumatic stress disorder.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Veterans' Week: UNT Speaks Out on Coming Home

Veterans' Week: UNT Speaks Out on Coming Home

Date: November 15, 2012
Creator: Lawrence, Samantha
Description: This poster introduces the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on Coming Home as part of Veterans Week. There will also be a panel of three student veterans describing their experiences after deployment.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries