When Reality Was Surreal: Lee Miller's World War II War Correspondence for  Vogue

When Reality Was Surreal: Lee Miller's World War II War Correspondence for Vogue

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Date: December 2003
Creator: Rose, Josh
Description: During World War II, Lee Miller was an accredited war correspondent for Vogue magazine. Miller was trained as a surrealist photographer by Man Ray, and her wartime work, both photographic and written, is indicative of a combination of journalism and surrealism. This thesis examines Lee Miller's war correspondence within the context of Vogue magazine, establishing parallels between the photographs and writing to determine how surrealism informs it stylistically and ideologically. Using surrealist techniques of juxtaposition and an unmanipulated photographic style, and the surrealist concepts of the Marvelous and Convulsive Beauty, Miller presented the war as a surreality, or a surreal reality. This study concludes by using Miller's approach to suggest a new concept of journalistic practice: surrealist journalism.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Stylistic Analysis of American Indian Portrait Photography in Oklahoma, 1869-1904

A Stylistic Analysis of American Indian Portrait Photography in Oklahoma, 1869-1904

Date: May 2001
Creator: Nelson, Amy
Description: This thesis studies the style of Native American portrait photographs of William S. Soule (1836-1908), John K. Hillers (1834-1925), and William E. Irwin (1871-1935), who worked in Oklahoma from 1869 to 1904. The examination of the three men's work revealed that each artist had different motivations for creating Native American portrait photographs, and a result, used a distinct style. However, despite the individual artistic styles, each artist conformed to Native American stereotypes common during the nineteenth-century. The thesis includes a discussion of the history of the area, photographer biographies, a stylistic analysis of the photographs, and how the images fit into American Indian stereotypes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Breaking Outside: Narratives of Art and Hawaii

Breaking Outside: Narratives of Art and Hawaii

Date: May 2013
Creator: Davidson, Allison B.
Description: This research examines the personal narratives of two contemporary non-native artists living and working on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Issues related to narratives, power structures, artistic processes, insider/outsider dynamics, Hawaiian culture, island life, surfing, and the researcher's own experiences are woven together to formulate realizations surrounding alternative knowledge systems and the power of multiple or hidden narratives to the practice of art education.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Unremarkable on the Face of It

Unremarkable on the Face of It

Date: December 3, 2009
Creator: O'Connor, Brian Clark
Description: This paper was part of a series by the Smithsonian Photography Initiative 'Click! Photography Changes Everything'. This paper discusses family photographs and how sometimes seemingly unremarkable snapshots can be truly remarkable.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Information
This Side of the Border: The Mexican Revolution through the Lens of American Photographer Otis A. Aultman

This Side of the Border: The Mexican Revolution through the Lens of American Photographer Otis A. Aultman

Date: February 17, 2011
Creator: Carlisle, Tara
Description: This presentation discusses the Mexican Revolution, as seen through the camera lens of American photographer Otis A. Aultman. In 2009, El Paso Public Library's Archivist Marta Estrada received a grant from the UNT Libraries to digitize a portion of their Otis Aultman Photograph Collection and add it to The Portal to Texas History. El Paso Public Library's collection on the Portal consists of more than 500 digitized glass plate negative photographs that documents the Mexican Revolution through the eyes of Mr. Aultman, many of which have not been seen for a century.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Beads on a String: Extended Portraits

Beads on a String: Extended Portraits

Date: December 2004
Creator: Kolčavová, Gabriela
Description: When I was first introduced to photography, I was mainly drawn to landscape imagery. I enjoyed being a solitary spectator. Over time, inclusions of figurative elements became more and more apparent in my work. I purposefully began to incorporate a figure into my landscapes, ascribing to it a certain nostalgia and a sense of isolation I was experiencing on many levels at that time. Before long, I felt disconnected from these images because of their ambiguity and generalization. I found myself craving more content and personal commitment in my photography. At the end 2003, I started experimenting with a 4" x 5" format camera, which forced me, to some extent, to change my way of photographing and seeing. That is how the beginning of this new body of work was born. I was accustomed to shooting with a 35 mm camera, which allowed me to be spontaneous, quick and immediate. I permanently switched to a large format. I could see myself benefiting from this change. I lost some of the spontaneity that a 35 mm format offers but I gained the beauty of working with larger negatives and the endless possibilities of view camera movements. Thanks to this technical transformation, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Photography Changes Our Environmental Awareness

Photography Changes Our Environmental Awareness

Date: 2011
Creator: O'Connor, Brian Clark & Klaver, Irene
Description: This article is part of a series by the Smithsonian Photography Initiative called Click! Photography Changes Everything. This article discusses how photography and increased visibility can bridge the gap between the natural world and human interaction.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Information
Realismo Magico Digital: An Exploration of Self-Identity

Realismo Magico Digital: An Exploration of Self-Identity

Date: May 2001
Creator: Mateos, Cesar Augusto
Description: The internal necessity to rediscover myself constantly drives me back to the country where I spent most of my life, Mexico. I was born and raised in the heart of the world's largest metropolis, Mexico City and through the years I have photographed in locations with important significance for Mexican culture as well as for my personal history. I reorganize and reinvent these places, and by staging models there, I construct my personal interpretation of the Mexican way of life involving the world of “manana” (tomorrow) with its “dictadura perfecta” (perfect dictatorship), where opposite and contradictory situations exist side by side. I am particularly interested in the relationship between people and their environ-ment and I use this theme as a means to explore my own identity as a Mexican. One strategy involves juxtaposing cultural signifiers of Mexican culture. My images are an examination and a projection of my ideals, fears, and dreams about my country and myself.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Man Ray's 'Noire et Blanche': Avant-garde, fashion, and Other(s)

Man Ray's 'Noire et Blanche': Avant-garde, fashion, and Other(s)

Date: April 2, 2009
Creator: Weston, Charisse & Way, Jennifer
Description: This presentation accompanies a paper examining Man Ray's photographic series, 'Noire et blanche' from 1926. 'Noire et Blanche consists of more than twenty photographs of a pale-faced, female model holding a darkly stained African mask. This presentation accompanies the research and shows four of the photographs in this series.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Photography in Colonial and Postcolonial India as an Agent of Cultural Dominance

Photography in Colonial and Postcolonial India as an Agent of Cultural Dominance

Date: April 2, 2009
Creator: Joyce, Megan & Owen, Lisa N.
Description: This presentation accompanies a paper discussing research exploring the use of photography in colonial India. The thesis of the paper is that British photographers, through their choice of subjects and editing of their works, created a romanticized image of India as the British wished to see it. More recent photography has focused on the reality of the lives of the Indian people. Thus photography has moved from functioning as an agent of colonial domination and political propaganda to a tool used to bring aid and compassion to those in need.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
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