CLUE: A Cluster Evaluation Tool

CLUE: A Cluster Evaluation Tool

Date: December 2006
Creator: Parker, Brandon S.
Description: Modern high performance computing is dependent on parallel processing systems. Most current benchmarks reveal only the high level computational throughput metrics, which may be sufficient for single processor systems, but can lead to a misrepresentation of true system capability for parallel systems. A new benchmark is therefore proposed. CLUE (Cluster Evaluator) uses a cellular automata algorithm to evaluate the scalability of parallel processing machines. The benchmark also uses algorithmic variations to evaluate individual system components' impact on the overall serial fraction and efficiency. CLUE is not a replacement for other performance-centric benchmarks, but rather shows the scalability of a system and provides metrics to reveal where one can improve overall performance. CLUE is a new benchmark which demonstrates a better comparison among different parallel systems than existing benchmarks and can diagnose where a particular parallel system can be optimized.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Theoretical Network Model and the Incremental Hypercube-Based Networks

A Theoretical Network Model and the Incremental Hypercube-Based Networks

Date: May 1995
Creator: Mao, Ai-sheng
Description: The study of multicomputer interconnection networks is an important area of research in parallel processing. We introduce vertex-symmetric Hamming-group graphs as a model to design a wide variety of network topologies including the hypercube network.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Practical Parallel Processing

Practical Parallel Processing

Date: August 1996
Creator: Zhang, Hua, 1954-
Description: The physical limitations of uniprocessors and the real-time requirements of numerous practical applications have made parallel processing an essential technology in military, industry and scientific research. In this dissertation, we investigate parallelizations of three practical applications using three parallel machine models. The algorithms are: Finitely inductive (FI) sequence processing is a pattern recognition technique used in many fields. We first propose four parallel FI algorithms on the EREW PRAM. The time complexity of the parallel factoring and following by bucket packing is O(sk^2 n/p), and they are optimal under some conditions. The parallel factoring and following by hashing requires O(sk^2 n/p) time when uniform hash functions are used and log(p) ≤ k n/p and pm ≈ n. Their speedup is proportional to the number processors used. For these results, s is the number of levels, k is the size of the antecedents and n is the length of the input sequence and p is the number of processors. We also describe algorithms for raster/vector conversion based on the scan model to handle block-like connected components of arbitrary geometrical shapes with multi-level nested dough nuts for the IES (image exploitation system). Both the parallel raster-to-vector algorithm and parallel vector-to-raster algorithm require ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Parallel Programming Language

A Parallel Programming Language

Date: May 1979
Creator: Cox, Richard D.
Description: The problem of programming a parallel processor is discussed. Previous methods of programming a parallel processor, analyzing a program for parallel paths, and special language features are discussed. Graph theory is used to define the three basic programming constructs: choice, sequence, repetition. The concept of mechanized programming is expanded to allow for total separation of control and computational sections of a program. A definition of a language is presented which provides for this separation. A method for developing the program graph is discussed. The control graph and data graph are developed separately. The two graphs illustrate control and data predecessor relationships used in determining parallel elements of a program.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries