Automated Low-cost Instrument for Measuring Total Column Ozone

Automated Low-cost Instrument for Measuring Total Column Ozone

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2006
Creator: Nebgen, Gilbert Bernard
Description: Networks of ground-based and satellite borne instruments to measure ultraviolet (UV) sunlight and total column ozone have greatly contributed to an understanding of increased amounts of UV reaching the surface of the Earth caused by stratospheric ozone depletion. Increased UV radiation has important potential effects on human health, and agricultural and ecological systems. Observations from these networks make it possible to monitor total ozone decreases and to predict ozone recovery trends due to global efforts to curb the use of products releasing chemicals harmful to the ozone layer. Thus, continued and expanded global monitoring of ozone and UV is needed. However, existing automatic stratospheric ozone monitors are complex and expensive instruments. The main objective of this research was the development of a low-cost fully automated total column ozone monitoring instrument which, because of its affordability, will increase the number of instruments available for ground-based observations. The new instrument is based on a high-resolution fiber optic spectrometer, coupled with fiber optics that are precisely aimed by a pan and tilt positioning mechanism and with controlling programs written in commonly available software platforms which run on a personal computer. This project makes use of novel low-cost fiber optic spectrometer technology. A cost ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Ozone Layer: Ozone Depletion, Recovery in a Changing Climate, and the "World Avoided"

The Ozone Layer: Ozone Depletion, Recovery in a Changing Climate, and the "World Avoided"

Date: 2008
Creator: U.S. Global Change Research Program
Description: This brochure describes the role of ozone in the stratosphere, and the effect it has on ultraviolet light, as well as how the Montreal Protocol and subsequent laws have affected ozone-depleting pollutants in the atmosphere.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
IPCC Expert Meeting on Emission Scenarios

IPCC Expert Meeting on Emission Scenarios

Date: 2005
Creator: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
Description: This report summarizes the Expert Meeting on Emission Scenarios to help inform the fourth Assessment Report of the IPCC.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Air Quality Forecasting: A Review of Federal Programs and Research Needs

Air Quality Forecasting: A Review of Federal Programs and Research Needs

Date: June 2001
Creator: National Science and Technology Council (U.S.). Air Quality Research Subcommittee.
Description: This report provides a brief overview of the state of science of air quality forecasting. The report was composed to guide future federal research in air quality forecasting.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Executive Order 2010-06 : Governor's Policy on Climate Change

Executive Order 2010-06 : Governor's Policy on Climate Change

Date: October 2010
Creator: Brewer, Janice K.
Description: WHEREAS, Arizona was a founding member of the Western Climate Initiative (WCI) in February 2007; WHEREAS, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) finalized regulations mandating GHG reporting, effective on December 29, 2009,...WHEREAS, it is critical that Arizona stay informed of and influence any federal regulation and legislation relating to climate change and capping of GHG emission...NOW, THEREFORE, I, Janice K. Brewer, Governor of the State of Arizona,...hereby order and direct as follows: 4. The Climate Change Oversight Group ("Group") is established and charged with monitoring the continued work of the WCI...11. The Group and this Executive Order shall expire December 31, 2012
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Environmental Effects of Ozone Depletion: 1994 Assessment

Environmental Effects of Ozone Depletion: 1994 Assessment

Date: November 1994
Creator: United Nations Environment Programme
Description: A change in the composition of the stratosphere becomes relevant to society only if it has noticeable effects. This places the assessment of effects in a pivotal role in the problem of ozone depletion. Decreases in the quantity of total-column ozone, as now observed in many places, tend to cause increased penetration of solar UV-B radiation (290-315 nm) to the Earth's surface. UV-B radiation is the most energetic component of sunlight reaching the surface. It has profound effects on human health, animals, plants, microorganisms, materials and on air quality. Thus any perturbation which leads to an increase in UV-B radiation demands careful consideration of the possible consequences. This is the topic of the present assessment made by the Panel on Environmental Effects of Ozone Depletion.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Ozone

Ozone

Date: 2002
Creator: NASA Earth Observatory
Description: In the stratosphere, ozone is created primarily by ultraviolet radiation. When high-energy ultraviolet rays strike ordinary oxygen molecules (O2), they split the molecule into two single oxygen atoms, known as atomic oxygen. A freed oxygen atom then combines with another oxygen molecule to form a molecule of ozone. There is so much oxygen in our atmosphere, that these high-energy ultraviolet rays are completely absorbed in the stratosphere.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Ozone

Ozone

Date: 2002
Creator: NASA Earth Observatory
Description: Although it represents only a tiny fraction of the atmosphere, ozone is crucial for life on Earth. Depending on where ozone resides, it can protect or harm life on Earth.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Ozone

Ozone

Date: 2002
Creator: NASA Earth Observatory
Description: The term "ozone depletion" means more than just the natural destruction of ozone, it means that ozone loss is exceeding ozone creation.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Ozone

Ozone

Date: 2002
Creator: NASA Earth Observatory
Description: The amount and distribution of ozone molecules in the stratosphere varies greatly over the globe. Ozone molecules are transported around the stratosphere much as water clouds are transported in the troposphere. Therefore, scientists observing ozone fluctuations over just one spot could not know whether a change in local ozone levels meant an alteration in global ozone levels, or simply a fluctuation in the concentration over that particular spot. Satellites have given scientists the ability to overcome this problem because they provide a picture of what is happening daily over the entire Earth.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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