Microwave absorption by an array of carbon nanotubes: A phenomenological model

Microwave absorption by an array of carbon nanotubes: A phenomenological model

Date: August 29, 2006
Creator: Ye, Z.; Deering, William D.; Krokhin, Arkadii A. & Roberts, James A.
Description: Article discussing microwave absorption by an array of carbon nanotubes and a phenomenological model.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
UNT Research, Volume 19, 2010

UNT Research, Volume 19, 2010

Date: 2010
Creator: University of North Texas
Description: UNT Research magazine includes articles and notes about research at University of North Texas in various academic fields.
Contributing Partner: University Relations, Communications & Marketing department for UNT
Use of Microwaves to Crosslink Carbon Nanotubes

Use of Microwaves to Crosslink Carbon Nanotubes

Date: December 17, 2003
Creator: Tour, James M.; Stephenson, Jason J.; Imholt, Timothy; Dyke, Christopher A.; Yakobson, Boris I. & Roberts, James A.
Description: Patent relating to the use of microwaves to crosslink carbon nanotubes.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Microwave Attenuation Standards and Measurements

Microwave Attenuation Standards and Measurements

Date: April 3, 1967
Creator: Beatty, Robert W.
Description: Report discussing microwave attenuation measurement methods and standards. In addition, a relatively new and more precise way of representing and analyzing an attenuation measurement is presented. This in turn permits more rigorous definitions and error analyses than were previously possible. The referral of microwave attenuation measurements to standards operating at lower frequencies is discussed with particular attention to the errors in the referral processes as well as the errors in the standards themselves. Desirable characteristics are listed for attenuators which are suitable for calibration. Measurement methods are classified and described. Comments are made on the accuracy and convenience of various methods, and references are given which cover most of the basic and important research in this field. Key words: Microwave, attenuation, measurements, standards, tutorial.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
[News Script: Texas news review]

[News Script: Texas news review]

Date: November 4, 1951
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Description: Script from the WBAP-TV station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story about major Texas news stories from the past week.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
Interaction of Microwaves and Germinating Seeds

Interaction of Microwaves and Germinating Seeds

Date: August 1987
Creator: Shafer, Floyd L. (Floyd Lorenz)
Description: This investigation was concerned with determining the interaction of microwaves with germinating seeds. This study covers two different approaches. The preliminary efforts covered the response of germinating seeds to treatment by microwaves and heat. The second phase of the investigation used microwaves as a probe to determine some of the processes of early seed germination. The preliminary investigation measured the internal metabolic process by ATP production. Leakage of ions and organic material from germinating seeds indicated that membranes are a target of microwaves and heat. Electron photo-micrographs showed an increase in damage to membranes as heat and microwave treatments were increased. The second phase of this investigation was concerned with determining some of the biological activity at the initiation of germination of wheat seeds, Triticum aestivum L., using a resonating microwave cavity oscillating at 9.3 GHz as a probe. Direct current conductivity measurements were also made on the seeds as a means of confirming the observations made with the microwave cavity. There was no observable difference between treatment by UHF or heat in the ultrastructure of germinating seeds. A dielectric response far above that of free water was found as live seeds of wheat began to imbibe water. This effect ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries