Facilitators and Inhibitors to Self-Maintenance for Type II Diabetics

Facilitators and Inhibitors to Self-Maintenance for Type II Diabetics

Date: April 3, 2008
Creator: Davis, Rian E. & Davenport, Beverly
Description: This presentation discusses research on managing diabetes, and specifically what the facilitators and inhibitors are to self-maintenance of Type II diabetes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Current Behavioral and Psychosocial Interventions for HIV/AIDS

Current Behavioral and Psychosocial Interventions for HIV/AIDS

Date: December 1, 2011
Creator: Vosvick, Mark A.
Description: This presentation is part of the faculty lecture series UNT Speaks Out on AIDS. This presentation discusses recent directions in psychosocial research on HIV/AIDS in the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Mathematics Anxiety and Mathematics Self-efficacy in Relation to Medication Calculation Performance in Nurses

Mathematics Anxiety and Mathematics Self-efficacy in Relation to Medication Calculation Performance in Nurses

Date: May 2012
Creator: Melius, Joyce
Description: The purpose of this study is to identify and analyze the relationships that exist between mathematics anxiety and nurse self-efficacy for mathematics, and the medication calculation performance of acute care nurses. This research used a quantitative correlational research design and involved a sample of 84 acute care nurses, LVNs and RNs, from a suburban private hospital. the participants filled out a Mathematics Anxiety Scale, a Nurse Self-Efficacy for Mathematics Scale and also completed a 20-item medication calculation test. Significant practical and statistical relationships were discovered between the variables utilizing multiple linear regression statistics and commonality analysis. As the Nurse’s Mathematics anxiety score increased the scores on the medication test decreased and the scores on nurse self-efficacy for mathematics scale also decreased. the demographic item of “Hours a nurse worked in one week” had the greatest significance. the more hours a nurse worked the lower their score was on the medication calculation test. This study agrees with others that nurses are not good at mathematics. This study also correlated that as the number of hours worked increased so did the medication calculations errors. and many nurses have a measurable level of anxiety about mathematics and dosage calculations and this may influence ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries