Photophysical properties of pyrene, 2,7 diazapyrene and 1,3-bis(β-naphthyl)propane.

Photophysical properties of pyrene, 2,7 diazapyrene and 1,3-bis(β-naphthyl)propane.

Date: August 2007
Creator: Boateng, Stephen
Description: The luminescence properties of Van Der Waals' dimers and clusters of pyrene and diazapyrene have been investigated. Excimers, dimeric species which are associative in an excited electronic state and dissociative in their ground state, have long been established and play an important role in many areas of photochemistry. My work here focuses on the luminescence and absorption properties of ground state dimers/aggregates, which are less understood, and allows further characterization of the ground state and excited state association of these aromatic molecules.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Computational Investigation of the Photophysical, Electronic and Bonding Properties of Exciplex-Forming Van der Waals Systems

A Computational Investigation of the Photophysical, Electronic and Bonding Properties of Exciplex-Forming Van der Waals Systems

Date: December 2007
Creator: Sinha, Pankaj
Description: Calculations were performed on transition-metal complexes to (1) extrapolate the structure and bonding of the ground and phosphorescent states (2) determine the luminescence energies and (3) assist in difficult assignment of luminescent transitions. In the [Pt(SCN)4]2- complex, calculations determined that the major excited-state distortion is derived from a b2g bending mode rather than from the a1g symmetric stretching mode previously reported in the literature. Tuning of excimer formation was explained in the [Au(SCN)2]22- by interactions with the counterion. Weak bonding interactions and luminescent transitions were explained by calculation of Hg dimers, excimers and exciplexes formed with noble gases.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Photophysics and Photochemistry of Copper(I) Phosphine and Collidine Complexes: An Experimental/Theoretical Investigation

Photophysics and Photochemistry of Copper(I) Phosphine and Collidine Complexes: An Experimental/Theoretical Investigation

Date: August 2011
Creator: Determan, John J.
Description: Copper(I) complexes have been studied through both experimental and computational means in the presented work. Overall, the work focuses on photophysical and photochemical properties of copper(I) complexes. Photophysical and photochemical properties are found to be dependent on the geometries of the copper(I) complexes. One of the geometric properties that are important for both photochemical and photophysical properties is coordination number. Coordination numbers have been observed to be dependent on both ligand size and recrystallization conditions. The complexes geometric structure, as well as the electronic effects of the coordination ligands, is shown both computationally as well as experimentally to affect the emission energies. Two-coordinate complexes are seen to have only weak emission at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K), while at room temperature (298 K) the two-coordinate complexes are not observed to be luminescent. Three-coordinate complexes are observed to be luminescent at liquid nitrogen temperature as well as at room temperature. The three-coordinate complexes have a Y-shaped ground (S0) state that distorts towards a T-shape upon photoexcitation to the lowest lying phosphorescent state (T1). The geometric distortion is tunable by size of the coordinating ligand. Luminescence is controllable by limiting the amount of non-radiative emission. One manner by which non-radiative emission is ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Microwave-Assisted Synthesis, Characterization, and Photophysical Properties of New Rhenium(I) Pyrazolyl-Triazine Complexes

Microwave-Assisted Synthesis, Characterization, and Photophysical Properties of New Rhenium(I) Pyrazolyl-Triazine Complexes

Date: May 2010
Creator: Salazar Garza, Gustavo Adolfo
Description: The reaction of the chelating ligand 4-[4,6-bis(3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]-N,N-diethyl-benzenamine, L, with pentacarbonylchlororhenium by conventional heating method produces the complexes fac-[ReL(CO)3Cl2] and fac-[Re2L(CO)6Cl2] in a period of 48 hours. The use of microwaves as the source of heat and the increase in the equivalents of one of the reactants leads to a more selective reaction and also decreases the reaction time to 1 hour. After proper purification, the photophysical properties of fac-[ReL(CO)3Cl] were analyzed. The solid-state photoluminescence analysis showed an emission band at 628 nm independent of temperature. However, in the solution studies, the emission band shifted from 550 nm in frozen media to 610 nm when the matrix became fluid. These results confirm that this complex possess a phenomenon known as rigidochromism.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Biocompatible Hybrid Nanomaterials Involving Polymers and Hydrogels Interfaced with Phosphorescent Complexes and Toxin-Free Metallic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

Biocompatible Hybrid Nanomaterials Involving Polymers and Hydrogels Interfaced with Phosphorescent Complexes and Toxin-Free Metallic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

Date: August 2011
Creator: Marpu, Sreekar B.
Description: The major topics discussed are all relevant to interfacing brightly phosphorescent and non-luminescent coinage metal complexes of [Ag(I) and Au(I)] with biopolymers and thermoresponsive gels for making hybrid nanomaterials with an explanation on syntheses, characterization and their significance in biomedical fields. Experimental results and ongoing work on determining outreaching consequences of these hybrid nanomaterials for various biomedical applications like cancer therapy, bio-imaging and antibacterial abilities are described. In vitro and in vivo studies have been performed on majority of the discussed hybrid nanomaterials and determined that the cytotoxicity or antibacterial activity are comparatively superior when compared to analogues in literature. Consequential differences are noticed in photoluminescence enhancement from hybrid phosphorescent hydrogels, phosphorescent complex ability to physically crosslink, Au(I) sulfides tendency to form NIR (near-infrared) absorbing AuNPs compared to any similar work in literature. Syntheses of these hybrid nanomaterials has been thoroughly investigated and it is determined that either metallic nanoparticles syntheses or syntheses of phosphorescent hydrogels can be carried in single step without involving any hazardous reducing agents or crosslinkers or stabilizers that are commonly employed during multiple step syntheses protocols for syntheses of similar materials in literature. These astounding results that have been discovered within studies of hybrid nanomaterials ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Water-soluble Phosphors for Hypoxia Detection in Chemical and Biological Media

Water-soluble Phosphors for Hypoxia Detection in Chemical and Biological Media

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2012
Creator: Satumtira, Nisa Tara
Description: Water-soluble Pt(II) phosphors exist predominantly for photophysical studies. However, fewer are known to be candidates for cisplatin derivatives. If such a molecule could exist, it would be efficient at not only destroying the cancerous cells which harm the body, but the destruction would also be traceable within the human body as it occurred. Herein, research accomplished in chemistry describes the photophysical properties of a water-soluble phosphor. Spectroscopically, this phosphor is unique in that it possesses a strong green emission at room temperature in aqueous media. Its emission is also sensitive to the gaseous environment. These properties have been expanded to both analytical and biological applications. Studies showing the potential use of the phosphor as a heavy metal remover from aqueous solutions have been accomplished. The removal of toxic heavy metals was indicated by the loss of emission as well as the appearance of a precipitate. The gaseous sensitivity was elicited to be used as a potential cancerous cell biomarker. In vivo studies were accomplished in a wide variety of species, including bacteria (E. coli), worms (C. elegans), small crustaceans (Artemia), and fish (D. rerio and S. ocellatus). The phosphor in question is detectable in all of the above. This fundamental ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Preparation of flat dendrimers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons connected via 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene core.

Preparation of flat dendrimers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons connected via 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene core.

Date: December 2008
Creator: Jung, Jiyoung
Description: Flat dendrimers, consisting of a hexavalent aromatic core and rigid ethynyl units locked in place by ether connections were developed based upon the divergent synthetic method. Alternating functional groups were adopted on each site of the hexa-substituted benzene, in order to avoid undesired cyclization pathways. The flat structures of conjugated dendrimers would allow investigation on the discotic liquid crystal properties. In addition, these ethylnyl dendrimers are expected to show directed energy and electron transfer with a highly conjugated system, and thus are effective in the preparation of photoreactive materials such as electronic sensors or light harvesting materials. Conjugated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, consisting of naphthalene, anthracene, pyrene, and phenanthrene groups connected via 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene cores, were synthesized. These molecules exhibited luminescence properties and the π-complexation with a mercury trifunctional lewis acid are expected to enhance the phosphorescence in the presence of the heavy metal due to the spin-orbit coupling. Besides, owing to the presence of heavy metal atom in the Au (I) complexes linked by s-bonded triethynyltriphenylene luminophore, the phosphorescence occurs from a metal-centered emission. The conjugated organic luminophores have been developed to produce excellent quantum efficiencies, brightness, and long lifetimes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Luminescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Modeling of Troponin in the Presence of Myosin and Troponin/Tropomyosin Defining Myosin Binding Target Zones in the Reconstituted Thin Filament

Luminescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Modeling of Troponin in the Presence of Myosin and Troponin/Tropomyosin Defining Myosin Binding Target Zones in the Reconstituted Thin Filament

Date: May 2009
Creator: Patel, Dipesh A.
Description: Mechanistic details on the regulation of striated muscle contraction still need to be determined, particularly the specific structural locations of the elements comprising the thick and thin filaments. Of special interest is the location of the regulatory component, troponin, on the actin filament and how its presence influences the behavior of myosin binding to the thin filament. In the present study: (1) Luminescence resonance energy transfer was used to monitor potential conformational changes in the reconstituted thin filament between the C-terminal region of troponin T and myosin subfragment 1; (2) Location of troponin in previously derived atomic models of the acto-myosin complex was mapped to visualize specific contacts; and (3) Shortened tropomyosin was engineered and protein binding and ATPase assays were performed to study the effect of myosin binding close to the troponin complex. Analysis of the results suggest the following: (1) Irrespective of calcium levels, the C-terminal region of troponin T is located close to myosin loop 3 and a few actin helices that may perturb strong acto-myosin interactions responsible for force production. (2) Atomic models indicate myosin subfragment 1 cannot attain the post- powerstroke state due to the full motion of the lever arm being sterically hindered by ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries