Wood shelters our planes : the Army & Navy need 156,000,000 board feet a year for hangars.

Wood shelters our planes : the Army & Navy need 156,000,000 board feet a year for hangars.

Date: 1943
Creator: Rochon Hoover Studio.
Description: Scene of men building a hangar. In the foreground are several stacks of lumber. Two Army airplanes fly overhead.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
You give him wings! : the Army needs lumber for training planes.

You give him wings! : the Army needs lumber for training planes.

Date: 1943
Creator: Ward, E. T.
Description: A pilot in a khaki flight suit climbs into an airplane. Two planes are flying overhead in the distance.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Selling black walnut timber.

Selling black walnut timber.

Date: April 1959
Creator: Brush, Warren David, 1881-
Description: A guide to grading and selling black walnut logs for lumber.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Forestry for farmers.

Forestry for farmers.

Date: 1898
Creator: United States. Dept. of Agriculture.
Description: A guide to planting and maintaining small timber tracts or wood lots on farmlands.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Wood lands our fighters : the Army & Navy need more lumber for landing barges.

Wood lands our fighters : the Army & Navy need more lumber for landing barges.

Date: 1943
Creator: United States. Army.
Description: Uniformed soldiers with rifles and machine guns storm a tropical beach. Boats and a battleship are seen in the background.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Wood joins the colors! : the Army & Navy need millions of board feet for barracks.

Wood joins the colors! : the Army & Navy need millions of board feet for barracks.

Date: 1943
Creator: Starr, Maxwell B.
Description: A soldier in uniform and helmet stands guard as wooden boards are lifted to a construction site where men are building barracks. Already-constructed barracks are seen in the background.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
"Keep that lumber coming!"

"Keep that lumber coming!"

Date: [1943]
Creator: Winslow, Earle, 1884-1969.
Description: Soldiers carry a beam of wood down to a river where a bridge is being built. The soldier on the right side of the picture is looking back and shouting toward the viewer. In the background is tropical scenery, an explosion, and artillery.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Lumber does its stuff --a long way from home.

Lumber does its stuff --a long way from home.

Date: 1943
Creator: United States. War Dept. Bureau of Public Relations.
Description: Poster consists of photographs and text in a purple-red tone. Six photographs depict the use of lumber by the U.S. armed forces in World War II: to build bridges, tents, and life rafts, and to ship supplies. Photos also illustrate how wooden shipping crates are re-used by field post offices and commissaries in the South Pacific.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Give us lumber for more PT's.

Give us lumber for more PT's.

Date: 1943
Creator: AEL.
Description: Color image of war ships at sea. In the foreground is a boat with "PT 34" painted on it, shining a light and speeding forward. In the background, a ship is sinking as explosive flames rise from it. Other ships and flames can be seen in the distance on the left.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
"Lumber production is falling behind our war needs. To save American soldiers' lives, we must provide the lumber our armed forces need--now!"

"Lumber production is falling behind our war needs. To save American soldiers' lives, we must provide the lumber our armed forces need--now!"

Date: 1943
Creator: United States. War Dept. Bureau of Public Relations.
Description: Poster shows four different black and white photos depicting the process of building a PT (patrol torpedo) boat; from cutting down a tree, through construction, up to the finished product. The quote appears in the middle, with a red border around it.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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