Consequences of Empowered CNA Teams in Nursing Home Settings: A Longitudinal Assessment

Consequences of Empowered CNA Teams in Nursing Home Settings: A Longitudinal Assessment

Date: January 1, 2007
Creator: Yeatts, Dale E., 1952- & Cready, Cynthia M.
Description: Article on a longitudinal assessment and the consequences of empowered CAN teams in nursing home settings.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
Long-Term Care: Elderly Individuals Could Find Significant Variation in the Availability of Medicaid Home and Community Services

Long-Term Care: Elderly Individuals Could Find Significant Variation in the Availability of Medicaid Home and Community Services

Date: September 26, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Description: Testimony issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "As the baby boomers age, spending on long-term care for the elderly could quadruple by 2050. The growing demand for long-term care will put pressure on federal and state budgets because long-term care relies heavily on public financing, particularly Medicaid. Nursing home care traditionally has accounted for most Medicaid long-term care expenditures, but the high costs of such care and the preference of many individuals to stay in their own homes has led states to expand their Medicaid programs to provide coverage for home- and community-based long-term care. GAO found that a Medicaid-eligible elderly individual with the same disabling conditions, care needs, and availability of informal family support could find significant differences in the type and intensity of home and community-based services that would be offered for his or her care. These differences were due in part to the very nature of long-term care needs--which can involve physical or cognitive disabling conditions--and the lack of a consensus as to what services are needed to compensate for these disabilities and what balance should exist between publicly available and family-provided services. The differences in care plans were also due to ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Long-Term Care: Federal Oversight of Growing Medicaid Home and Community-Based Waivers Should Be Strengthened

Long-Term Care: Federal Oversight of Growing Medicaid Home and Community-Based Waivers Should Be Strengthened

Date: June 20, 2003
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Home and community-based settings have become a growing part of states' Medicaid long-term care programs, serving as an alternative to care in institutional settings, such as nursing homes. To cover such services, however, states often obtain waivers from certain federal statutory requirements. GAO was asked to review (1) trends in states' use of Medicaid home and community-based service (HCBS) waivers, particularly for the elderly, (2) state quality assurance approaches, including available data on the quality of care provided to elderly individuals through waivers, and (3) the adequacy of federal oversight of state waivers. GAO is recommending that the Administrator of CMS take steps to (1) better ensure that state quality assurance efforts are adequate to protect the health and welfare of HCBS waiver beneficiaries, and (2) strengthen federal oversight of the growing HCBS waiver programs. Although CMS raised certain concerns about aspects of the report, such as the respective state and federal roles in quality assurance and the potential need for additional federal oversight resources, CMS generally concurred with the recommendations."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Long-Term Care: Availability of Medicaid Home and Community Services for Elderly Individuals Varies Considerably

Long-Term Care: Availability of Medicaid Home and Community Services for Elderly Individuals Varies Considerably

Date: September 26, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "As the baby boomers age, spending on long-term care for the elderly could quadruple by 2050. The growing demand for long-term care will put pressure on federal and state budgets because long-term care relies heavily on public financing, particularly Medicaid. Nursing home care traditionally has accounted for most Medicaid long-term care expenditures, but the high costs of such care and the preference of many individuals to stay in their own homes has led states to expand their Medicaid programs to provide coverage for home- and community-based long-term care. GAO found that a Medicaid-eligible elderly individual with the same disabling conditions, care needs, and availability of informal family support could find significant differences in the type and intensity of home and community-based services that would be offered for his or her care. These differences were due in part to the very nature of long-term care needs--which can involve physical or cognitive disabling conditions--and the lack of a consensus as to what services are needed to compensate for these disabilities and what balance should exist between publicly available and family-provided services. The differences in care plans were also ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Commission on Long-Term Care

Commission on Long-Term Care

Date: 2013
Creator: United States. Commission on Long-Term Care
Description: This is the website for the federal Commission on Long-Term Care. Established as part of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 and signed into law January 2, 2013, the commission's goal was to advise Congress on how comprehensive, high-quality long-term care can be better provided and financed for the nation's older adults and people with disabilities. The Commission is composed of 15 members of the Senate and House of Representatives and released its final report on September 18, 2013. The website includes the final report, all relevant press releases, and transcripts and other materials related to its public hearings.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Digital Projects Unit
Long-Term Care: Aging Baby Boom Generation Will Increase Demand and Burden on Federal and State Budgets

Long-Term Care: Aging Baby Boom Generation Will Increase Demand and Burden on Federal and State Budgets

Date: March 21, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Description: Testimony issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "As more and more of the baby boomers enter retirement age, spending for Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security is expected to absorb correspondingly larger shares of federal revenue and crowd out other spending. The aging of the baby boomers will also increase the demand for long-term care and contribute to federal and state budget burdens. The number of disabled elderly who cannot perform daily living activities without assistance is expected to double in the future. Long-term care spending from public and private sources--about $137 billion for persons of all ages in 2000--will rise dramatically as the baby boomers age. Without fundamental financing changes, Medicaid--which pays more than one-third of long-term care expenditures for the elderly--can be expected to remain one of the largest funding sources, straining both federal and state governments."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Long-Term Care: Implications of Supreme Court's Olmstead Decision Are Still Unfolding

Long-Term Care: Implications of Supreme Court's Olmstead Decision Are Still Unfolding

Date: September 24, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Description: Testimony issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "In the Olmstead case, the Supreme Court decided that states were violating title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) if they provided care to disabled people in institutional settings when they could be a appropriately served in a home or community-based setting. Considerable attention has focused on the decision's implications for Medicaid, the dominant public program supporting long-term care institutional, home, and community-based services. Although Medicaid spending for home and community-based service is growing, these are largely optional benefits that states may or may not choose to offer, and states vary widely in the degree to which they cover them. The implications of the Olmstead decision--in terms of the scope and the nature of states' obligation to provide home and community-based long-term care services--are still unfolding. Although the Supreme Court ruled that providing care in institutional settings may violate the ADA, it also recognized that there are limits to what states can do, given the available resources and the obligation to provide a range of services for disabled people. The decision left many open questions for states and lower courts to resolve. State programs ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Long-Term Care: Baby Boom Generation Increases Challenge of Financing Needed Services

Long-Term Care: Baby Boom Generation Increases Challenge of Financing Needed Services

Date: March 27, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Description: Testimony issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The confluence of the aging baby boom generation, longer life expectancies, and evolving options for providing and financing long-term care services will require substantial public and private investment in long-term care and the development of sufficient capacity to serve this growing population. Spending for long-term care was about $134 billion in 1999. Medicaid and Medicare paid for nearly 58 percent of these services, contributing about $59 billion and $18 billion, respectively. Private long-term care insurance was viewed as a possible way to reduce catastrophic financial risk for the elderly needing long-term care and to relieve some of the financing burden now shouldered by public long-term care programs. Yet private insurance represents only about 10 percent of long-term care spending. Questions remain about the affordability of policies and the value of the coverage relative to the premiums charged. Although many states have adopted standards for long-term care policies, it is uncertain whether these standards have bolstered consumer confidence in the reliability of long-term care insurance. If long-term care insurance is to have a more significant role in addressing the baby boom generation's upcoming chronic health care needs, consumers must ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Housing and the Aging Population: Options for the New Century

Housing and the Aging Population: Options for the New Century

Date: 1994
Creator: Folts, W. Edward (William Edward) & Yeatts, Dale E., 1952-
Description: This book is the second volume in the Garland Reference Library of Social Science Series. In this book, the authors address the topic of aging from a wide variety of perspectives and provide a basis for the discussion of housing issues concerning the elderly in the coming century.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
Empowered Work Teams in Long-Term Care: Strategies for Improving Outcomes for Residents and Staff

Empowered Work Teams in Long-Term Care: Strategies for Improving Outcomes for Residents and Staff

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: 2008
Creator: Yeatts, Dale E., 1952-; Cready, Cynthia M. & Noelker, Linda S.
Description: Book discussing empowered work teams in long-term care and strategies for improving outcomes for residents and staff.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service
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