The Cherokee Language and Culture: Can Either Survive?

The Cherokee Language and Culture: Can Either Survive?

Date: August 1972
Creator: Lyde, Judith Ann
Description: One of the three-fold purposes of this study is to indicate the relationship between the cultural advancements of the Cherokees and the development and implementation of a written, printable language into their culture. In fulfilling a second purposes, the study emphasizes the influence of literacy on the social values of the Cherokees. The third purpose is to consider the idea of the Cherokees themselves that bi-lingual education, first in Cherokee, then in English, and a renewed national pride and productivity in literacy could go far in solving the problems of social alienation and educational negativism that exist among un-assimilated Cherokees.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of the Impact of Content Literacy Strategy Instruction on Teaching and Learning

Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of the Impact of Content Literacy Strategy Instruction on Teaching and Learning

Date: December 2000
Creator: Maher, Sheila
Description: Reading researchers agree that content literacy strategies are beneficial in helping students learn. However, teachers remain resistant to teaching the strategies. Additionally, many students, even at the college level, lack the learning strategies necessary to experience academic success. This study sought to gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of content literacy strategy instruction. The research questions that guided the study addressed the benefits, obstacles, and support and experiences needed to sustain the use of the strategies over time. Multiple data sources were used to investigate teachers' and students' perceptions of the research questions. The main benefit found was increased student understanding and learning of content; additional benefits included increased instructional repertoire, increased student engagement in class, and improved learner independence. Most of the obstacles documented in the literature were supported in the study; however, the obstacle of time was noted most frequently. Teacher confidence was observed by the researcher as an obstacle. The majority of participants indicated they would continue using the strategies learned during the study in the future. Students noted the support needed to sustain content literacy strategy use depended on teachers providing direct instruction, practice using the strategies, and personal success with the strategies. Teachers also ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
English language learners: Does summer school make a difference in young children's literacy scores?

English language learners: Does summer school make a difference in young children's literacy scores?

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 2006
Creator: Wickert, DeAnna S.
Description: Many school districts consider literacy and oral language as a top priority for pre-kindergarten students. In the district under study, pre-kindergarten English language learner (ELL) students are encouraged to attend a special summer school program to increase their oral language ability in English. This study compared three groups of children: ELL students attending summer school v. ELL students not attending summer school v. English speaking students not attending summer school. The students' primary reading inventory scores from the end of pre-kindergarten to the middle of kindergarten in the areas of reading, writing and oral language were compared. As expected, ELLs who attended summer school showed significant growth in oral language development from the beginning of summer school to the end of summer school. While it was hypothesized that ELL students attending summer school would show more improvement in oral language than other children over time, there was no significant difference between summer school and non-summer school children's scores by the middle of kindergarten.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Critical Literacy Practices, Social Action Projects, and the Reader Who Struggles in School

Critical Literacy Practices, Social Action Projects, and the Reader Who Struggles in School

Date: December 2011
Creator: Bauer, Courtney Marie
Description: This study, conducted at an urban public school, explored the engagements of five, fourth grade, African American students who struggled with reading in school as they participated in critical literacy practices and social action projects with the assumption that critical analysis of written texts and concrete social actions were necessary for student empowerment. Using Discourse Analysis within a microethnographic framework, participants’ responses were analyzed. Early in the study, participants were hesitant to join in critical conversations about race. Over time, as participants deepened their critical literacy engagements, they divulged lived racism both in their private and public worlds. Specifically, the participants described the tensions and transgressions they experienced as minorities from civil rights curriculum, teachers and other students. The findings revealed instead of text based analyses, critical literacy practices transformed into the participants’ critical analysis of racism they experienced in their various worlds (home, school, and the larger, outside world) through language (not text). Similarly, the pre-conceived idea of social action projects changed from the creation of concrete products or actions into discussions in which mainstream discourse was interrupted. Tacit and overt understandings about race, identity and power suggested that the participants assumed multiple and contradictory identities (such as “victim ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
From inside the Arab family: What literacy practices occur when raising bilingual and biliterate children?

From inside the Arab family: What literacy practices occur when raising bilingual and biliterate children?

Date: December 2004
Creator: Alshaboul, Yousef Mohammad
Description: Living in the United States creates unique challenges in biliteracy and bilingualism for the Arab family. While extant literature provides insight into the literacy interactions and experiences of families from many other cultures now living in the U.S. , there is next to nothing regarding the Arab family literacy experience. Thus, knowledge about the literacy activities Arab families engage in as they gain access to and knowledge of a new culture and language is important. The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe the literacy practices of the Arab families raising bilingual and biliterate children in the U.S. This study , using methodology based on ethnographic approaches, investigated the literacy events, behaviors and interactions which occurred within one Arab family over a 16-week period. A second group of participants were 5 other Arab families living in the U.S. Data sources included video and audio recordings, field notes, observations, journals, informal interviews, and artifacts of children's literacy. The researcher and the participants engaged as co-participants in the research. Findings showed that driving factors behind home literacy practices were religious beliefs and the imminence of return to the home country. Arab mothers were found to yield a heavy influence on ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Nurturing Life-Long Language Learners

Nurturing Life-Long Language Learners

Date: 2012
Creator: Rodriguez, Cynthia; Araujo, Juan; Narayan, Ratna; Shappeck, Marco & Moss, Glenda
Description: This article discusses nurturing life-long language learners.
Contributing Partner: UNT Dallas
Fair balance? An analysis of the functional equivalence of risk and benefit information in prescription drug direct-to-consumer television advertising.

Fair balance? An analysis of the functional equivalence of risk and benefit information in prescription drug direct-to-consumer television advertising.

Date: August 2009
Creator: Baird-Harris, Kay
Description: Prescription drug direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) has been a subject of controversy in recent years. Though government regulations require equivalent prominence of risks and benefits, there is concern about the ability of consumers with limited health literacy to fully comprehend the risks and benefits associated with drug use. Evaluating the images in DTCA is important because individuals may rely on the visual message if the wording is overly complex. Using semiotics, this study aims to evaluate whether there is functional equivalence in the presentation of risk and benefit information in prescription drug direct-to-consumer television advertising. A new analytical method is created and used to assess the consistency between the messages contained in the voice track, the primary visual images, and the superscript/ subscript text. The results indicate that risk and benefit messages in this DTCA sample lack functional equivalence. However, it is important to properly frame these findings as the study does not evaluate viewer comprehension of the various message structures.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The White House Symposium on Advancing Global Literacy

The White House Symposium on Advancing Global Literacy

Date: 2008
Creator: White House
Description: This Website documented the White House Symposium on Advancing Global Literacy that held in New York City, New York, on September 22, 2008. The site also included the contents of the six UNESCO Regional Conferences in Support of Global Literacy: -Literacy Challenges in the Arab Region (Doha, Qatar – March 12 – 14, 2007) -Literacy Challenges in East Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific (Beijing, China – July 31 - August 1, 2007) -Renewing Literacy to Face African and International Challenges (Bamako, Mali – September 10 - 12, 2007) -Literacy Challenges in the South, Southwest and Central Asia (New Delhi, India – November 29 – 30, 2007) -Addressing Literacy Challenges in Europe with a Sub-Regional Focus (Baku, Azerbaijan – May 14 – 16, 2008) -Regional Literacy Conference in Latin America and the Caribbean (Mexico City, Mexico – September 10 – 13, 2008)
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Books for children : a guide for parents.

Books for children : a guide for parents.

Date: 1966
Creator: United States. Federal Extension Service.
Description: Briefly outlines the benefits of books for children. Provides instructions for making a picture book and writing a story for children.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The nature of the impact of a reading tutoring program on participating students in the classroom: A qualitative study

The nature of the impact of a reading tutoring program on participating students in the classroom: A qualitative study

Date: August 2000
Creator: Arrowood, Dana R.
Description: The purpose of this qualitative multi-case study was to explore the nature of the impact that a tutoring program, which featured preservice teachers as tutors, had on participating fifth grade at-risk students’ literacy behaviors in the classroom.The researcher served in the role of passive participant observer during the scheduled language arts period three days per week in the participating students’ classroom for a period of twenty-three weeks. Field notes were made in the classroom and coded, and audio tapes were recorded and transcribed of the tutoring sessions. Formal and informal interviews with the teacher, tutors, and participating students were conducted, transcribed, and coded. Lesson plans and reflections developed and written by the tutors were gathered and coded. Observations indicated that there were four types of reading required on a daily basis in the classroom. Assigned readings made by the teacher included narrative and expository texts. Pleasure readings were materials chosen by the students, but at certain times were teacher initiated and at other times, student initiated. The four types of reading found in the classroom were mirrored by the tutoring sessions. Students observed in the classroom could be divided into two types and four categories. Those with positive attitudes were ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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