Measuring sleep in college students with insomnia

Measuring sleep in college students with insomnia

Date: March 29, 2007
Creator: Williams, Jacob M. & Taylor, Daniel J.
Description: This presentation discusses research on measuring sleep in college students with insomnia. This presentation discusses the study, which sought to validate actigraphy for college students with insomnia.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Working Lifestyles and Sleepless Nights: The Role of Work in Patient Explanatory Models of Insomnia

Working Lifestyles and Sleepless Nights: The Role of Work in Patient Explanatory Models of Insomnia

Date: December 2006
Creator: McClellen, Dana L.
Description: Interviews conducted with patients receiving treatment for insomnia at one of two sleep medicine clinics, located in Texas and Oregon, suggest that work is a pivotal influence in shaping the respondents' interpretations, explanations and behaviors relating to insomnia. "Work" includes such facets as the nature of one's occupation, the associated volume or amount of work required, mental demands related to work, work schedules and work-related stress. Specifically, results reveal: 1) nearly 60% of the sample identify work as a primary or perpetuating cause of their insomnia, 2) respondents often report work as influencing the nature and importance of their sleep, 3) sleep is considered a problem, and medical intervention is solicited, after work is affected, and 4) work performance is a major consideration in determining treatment efficacy and compliance.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Adolescent Insomnia as a Predictor of Early Adulthood Outcomes

Adolescent Insomnia as a Predictor of Early Adulthood Outcomes

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2006
Creator: Roane, Brandy Michelle
Description: Recent research found insomnia is a risk factor for psychiatric disorders in adults. To see if the same would be true in adolescents, the current study re-analyzed data from a national longitudinal study collected by ADDHealth that evaluated health behaviors in 4552 adolescents (mean age 14.9 years [SD 1.7]) at baseline and again 7-8 years later (n = 3489) during young adulthood. Insomnia was reported by 9.2% of the adolescents. Cross-sectionally, adolescent insomnia was associated with alcohol, cannabis, non-cannabis drugs, and tobacco use, and depression after controlling for gender and ethnicity. Prospectively, adolescent insomnia was a significant risk factor for depression diagnosis, suicidal ideation, and the use of depression and stress prescription medications in young adulthood after controlling for gender, ethnicity, and significant baseline variable. In addition, a trend was noted for suicidal attempts.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Anxiety, Depression, and Sleep Disorders: Their Relationship and Reduction with Neurotherapy

Anxiety, Depression, and Sleep Disorders: Their Relationship and Reduction with Neurotherapy

Date: August 2010
Creator: Fisher, Christopher, Alan
Description: This study investigated the relationship among anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbances and the treatment of these three disorders through neurotherapy. Research suggests that these conditions commonly co-occur in the general population and that central nervous system (CNS) arousal may play a primary role in the development and maintenance of these disorders. Several recent studies suggested that neurotherapy, a biofeedback-based treatment for CNS dysregulation, might be an effective treatment for comorbid conditions, particularly the ones of interest here, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances. This investigation used a clinical case-series design to assess pre/post neurotherapy changes on objective measures of anxiety, depression, and sleep and to determine whether changes in anxiety and depression then predict improvements in sleep quality. Data for 23 participants (10 males) were obtained from files of adults (Mage = 40.22 years, SD = 16.20) who received at least 15 neurotherapy sessions (M = 47.83 sessions, SD = 22.23) the University of North Texas Neurotherapy Lab. Matched pair t-tests revealed that symptoms of sleep disturbance, depression, and anxiety showed significant improvements following neurotherapy. Neurotherapy treatment effect sizes generally ranged from moderate to large (d = .414 - .849). Multiple regression analysis found that changes in self-reported anxiety symptoms, but ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Randomized Clinical trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in a College Student Population

A Randomized Clinical trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in a College Student Population

Date: August 2011
Creator: Zimmerman, Marian Rose
Description: Nearly 10% of college students experience chronic insomnia. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTi) is an empirically validated multi-component treatment that has been demonstrated to produce reliable and durable benefits in the general adult population. However, there have been no studies examining the effectiveness of multi-component CBTi in a college student population, even though many studies have examined the efficacy of single treatment modalities. These young adults are different from the general adult population because they are in a unique transitional developmental phase as they are maturing from adolescence into adulthood, they are sleepier than adults, they tend to have irregular sleep schedules, and their living situations are often different from the general adult population. In this study college students with chronic insomnia were randomly assigned to either six sessions of CBTi or a wait list control (WLC) group. All participants completed sleep diaries, sleep measures, and psychosocial measures. The results indicated students who received CBTi showed improvements in sleep efficiency (SE), sleep onset latency (SOL), number of awakenings (NWAK), time awake after sleep onset (WASO), and sleep quality (SQ). They also had decreased insomnia severity (ISI), dysfunctional beliefs about sleep (DBAS), and general fatigue (MFI), as well as increases in ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Sleep in College Students

Sleep in College Students

Date: April 3, 2008
Creator: Taylor, Daniel J.
Description: In this University Scholars Day keynote address, Dr. Daniel J. Taylor presented the preliminary results from two of his recently completed studies in the Sleep Lab in the Department of Psychology at the University of North Texas.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Eveningness, Insomnia, and Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome in University Students

Eveningness, Insomnia, and Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome in University Students

Date: April 3, 2008
Creator: Clay, Kendra & Taylor, Daniel J.
Description: This presentation discusses research on eveningness, insomnia, and delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) in university students. Because DSPS and insomnia share the characteristics of difficulty falling sleep, it is possible that the two may sometimes be misdiagnosed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Effects of Different Exercise Types on Sleep in Patients with Chronic Primary Insomnia

Effects of Different Exercise Types on Sleep in Patients with Chronic Primary Insomnia

Date: April 14, 2011
Creator: Roman, Jorge & Taylor, Daniel J.
Description: Poster presented at the 2011 University Scholars Day at UNT. This poster discusses research on the effects of different exercise types on sleep in patients with chronic primary insomnia.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College