The effects of alternative contingencies on instruction following.

The effects of alternative contingencies on instruction following.

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Date: May 2003
Creator: Patti, Nicole
Description: The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the effects of alternative contingencies on instruction following by an ABA design. Three college students consistently pressed keys 1-5-3 and 4-8-6 in the presence of the written instruction "Press 153" or "Press 486." During condition A, the contingencies for following and not following the instruction were the same: CON FR5 FR5 and CON FR20 FR20. During condition B, the contingencies for following and not following the instruction were different: CON FR20 FR5. For one participant, the schedule of reinforcement was then changed to FR30. The results showed that subjects followed instructions when the schedule of reinforcement was the same for instruction following and not following.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of concurrent fixed interval-fixed ratio schedules of reinforcement on human responding.

Effects of concurrent fixed interval-fixed ratio schedules of reinforcement on human responding.

Date: August 2005
Creator: Parsons, Teresa Camille
Description: The present study contributes an apparatus and research paradigm useful in generating human performances sensitive to concurrent schedules of reinforcement. Five participants produced performances observed to be under temporal and ratio control of concurrent fixed interval-fixed ratio schedules. Two aspects of interaction between FI and FR schedules were distinguishable in the data. First, interaction between two schedules was observed in that changes in the value of one schedule affected behavior reinforced on another schedule. Second, switching from one pattern to the other functioned as an operant unit, showing stability during schedule maintenance conditions and sensitivity to extinction. These effects are discussed in the context of current views on behavior under concurrent schedules of reinforcement, and some implications for the conceptualization, measurement, analysis, and treatment of complex behavior are presented.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Liberation of Life: From the Cell to the Community

The Liberation of Life: From the Cell to the Community

Date: 1990
Creator: Birch, Charles & Cobb, John B., Jr.
Description: This book discusses the liberation of humans, animals and nature from both a biological and philosophical approach. The authors include information about biological and cultural evolution, as well as the implications of the organic or organismic ecological model. The index begins on page 345.
Contributing Partner: UNT Center For Environmental Philosophy
A comparison of auditory and visual stimuli in a delayed matching to sample procedure with adult humans.

A comparison of auditory and visual stimuli in a delayed matching to sample procedure with adult humans.

Date: December 2002
Creator: DeFulio, Anthony L.
Description: Five humans were exposed to a matching to sample task in which the delay (range = 0 to 32 seconds) between sample stimulus offset and comparison onset was manipulated across conditions. Auditory stimuli (1” tone) and arbitrary symbols served as sample stimuli for three (S1, S2, S3) and two (S4 and S5) subjects, respectively. Uppercase English letters (S, M, and N) served as comparison stimuli for all subjects. Results show small but systematic effects of the retention interval on accuracy and latency to selection of comparison stimuli. The results fail to show a difference between subjects exposed to auditory and visual sample stimuli. Some reasons for the failure to note a difference are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Does stimulus complexity affect acquisition of conditional discriminations and the emergence of derived relations?

Does stimulus complexity affect acquisition of conditional discriminations and the emergence of derived relations?

Date: December 2009
Creator: Martin, Tiffani L.
Description: Despite the central importance of conditional discriminations to the derivation of equivalence relations, there is little research relating the dynamics of conditional discrimination learning to the derivation of equivalence relations. Prior research has shown that conditional discriminations with simple sample and comparison stimuli are acquired faster than conditional discriminations with complex sample and comparison stimuli. This study attempted to replicate these earlier results and extend them by attempting to relate conditional discrimination learning to equivalence relations. Each of four adult humans learned four, four-choice conditional discriminations (simple-simple, simple-complex, complex-simple, and complex-complex) and were tested to see if equivalence relations had developed. The results confirm earlier findings showing acquisition to be facilitated with simple stimuli and retarded with complex stimuli. There was no difference in outcomes on equivalence tests, however. The results are in implicit agreement with Sidman's theory of stimulus equivalence.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries