Bringing Global and Multicultural Considerations into the Counseling Curriculum

Bringing Global and Multicultural Considerations into the Counseling Curriculum

Date: April 12, 2013
Creator: Schulz, Lisa L.
Description: Poster presented at the 2013 University Forum on Teaching & Learning at UNT. This poster describes the effectiveness of a peer co-constructed project involving multiple interviews. The interview data is compared, contrasted, and the similarities and differences are accounted for through the lens of lifespan development.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Education
Epilepsy: Not A Disease But A Disorder

Epilepsy: Not A Disease But A Disorder

Date: April 19, 2012
Creator: Prasain, Manisha & Eve, Susan Brown
Description: Poster presentation for the 2012 University Scholars Day at the University of North Texas discussing research on epilepsy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
International Economic Dependency and Human Development in Third World Countries

International Economic Dependency and Human Development in Third World Countries

Date: August 1996
Creator: Javidan Darugar, Mohammad Reza
Description: This study empirically tested the two competing development theories--modernization and dependency/world-system. Theoretical and methodological approaches suggested by these two paradigms offer opposing interpretations of the incorporation of the Third World countries into the world capitalist system. Therefore, they provide conflicting and, at times, confusing guidelines on the ways available to enhance the well-being of the general populations in these countries. To shed light on the subject matter, this study uses a few specific indicators of economic growth and human development by comparing the outcomes based on the two conflicting paradigms. The comparative process allows us to confirm the one theoretical approach that best explains human conditions in Third World settings. The study focuses on specific aspects of foreign domination--foreign investment, foreign trade, foreign debt, and the resulting disarticulated national economies. The main arguement, here, conveys the idea that as far as Third World countries are tied in an inescapable and unilaterally benefitial (to the core countries of course) economic and political relations, there will be no hope for any form of sustainable economic growth. Human well-being in Third World countries might very well depend on their ability to develop self-reliant economies with the least possible ties to the world capitalist ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries