Women's career success: The contributions of human capital, individual, organizational, and power variables.

Women's career success: The contributions of human capital, individual, organizational, and power variables.

Date: May 2008
Creator: Blansett, Karen D.
Description: Women are a significant presence in today's workforce; however, few rise to the top management ranks. Therefore, there is a critical need to better understand the factors that facilitate their success. This study examined several variables that may contribute to women's objective (income, span of control, promotions) and subjective (self-reported satisfaction) success. Predictive variables include human capital (training, experience), individual (perception of promotability, motivation for training), organizational (supervisor gender, percentage of male subordinates) and power (extent of supervisory authority) factors. Participants were members of the National Longitudinal Surveys Young Women cohort, conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Data were analyzed through simultaneous multiple regression analysis, and the results indicated that education was significantly related to income for all women. For women in management positions, their degree of supervisory power was also predictive of higher income, yet negatively associated with job satisfaction. Further, their span of control was positively influenced by the amount of time they spent in on-the-job training. The implications for women's career advancement, study limitations, and future research possibilities are also discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Constraints on adoption of innovations: Internet availability in the developing world.

Constraints on adoption of innovations: Internet availability in the developing world.

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2006
Creator: Stedman, Joseph B.
Description: In a world that is increasingly united in time and distance, I examine why the world is increasingly divided socially, economically, and digitally. Using data for 35 variables from 93 countries, I separate the countries into groups of 31 each by gross domestic product per capita. These groups of developed, lesser developed and least developed countries are used in comparative analysis. Through a review of relevant literature and tests of bivariate correlation, I select eight key variables that are significantly related to information communication technology development and to human development. For this research, adoption of the Internet in the developing world is the innovation of particular interest. Thus, for comparative purposes, I chose Internet Users per 1000 persons per country and the Human Development Index as the dependent variables upon which the independent variables are regressed. Although small in numbers among the least developed countries, I find Internet Users as the most powerful influence on human development for the poorest countries. The research focuses on key obstacles as well as variables of opportunity for Internet usage in developing countries. The greatest obstacles are in fact related to Internet availability and the cost/need ratio for infrastructure expansion. However, innovations for expanded ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Higher Education and Native Nation Building: Using a Human Capital Framework to Explore the Role of Postsecondary Education in Tribal Economic Development

Higher Education and Native Nation Building: Using a Human Capital Framework to Explore the Role of Postsecondary Education in Tribal Economic Development

Date: August 2012
Creator: Marling, David
Description: Native American Nations have perpetually had the highest rates of poverty and unemployment and the lowest per capita income of any ethnic population in the United States. Additionally, American Indian students have the highest high school dropout rates and lowest academic performance rates as well as the lowest college admission and retention rates in the nation. As Native Nations try to reverse these trends through sustainable economic development, they must do so with a limited number of educated, skilled workers in their own communities and with a complicated relationship with higher education that obstructs their ability to create a viable work force. This qualitative study proposed to research American Indian postsecondary access within the context of Native nations’ sovereignty and their social and economic development. Utilizing a theoretical framework of human capital and its role in rebuilding Native American economies, interviews were conducted with 19 education informants representing federally-recognized tribes in the Southern Plains Region. Major themes included financial issues related to college going in Native populations, familial and community influences, academic readiness, curricular development and delivery, the role of higher education in preparing students for tribal employment, and tribal economic development. Increasing Native American college student success and preparation ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Rebooting the Government Printing Office: Keeping America Informed in the Digital Age

Rebooting the Government Printing Office: Keeping America Informed in the Digital Age

Date: January 2013
Creator: National Academy of Public Adminstration (NAPA)
Description: The conference report to the 2012 Consolidated Appropriations Act mandated that the National Academy of Public Administration (the Academy) conduct a broad operational review of GPO to (1) update past studies of GPO operations; (2) examine the feasibility of GPO continuing to perform executive branch printing; and (3) identify additional cost saving operational alternatives beyond those that GPO has already implemented.The Academy formed a five-member Panel of Fellows to conduct a ten-month study of the agency’s current role, its operations, and its future direction. The Panel determined that the federal government in the digital age must continue to ensure that the public has permanent access to authentic government information and that GPO has a critical role to play in meeting this need. GPO leaders have made significant progress in “rebooting” the agency from a print-centric to a content-centric focus, but the agency needs to make further business and operational changes. The Panel issued fifteen recommendations intended to position the federal government for the digital age, strengthen GPO’s business model, and further GPO’s continuing transformation. Among other things, the Panel recommended that Congress establish an inter-agency process to develop a government-wide strategy for managing the life-cycle of digital government information; GPO ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department