Creating Captain America: a Frame Analysis of the Pat Tillman Epic

Creating Captain America: a Frame Analysis of the Pat Tillman Epic

Date: May 2013
Creator: DeWalt, Christina A. Childs
Description: Pat Tillman—an Arizona Cardinals player who sacrificed everything to serve his country but died in Afghanistan—was initially touted as a true American hero who was killed by enemy fire. In reality, however, the Tillman narrative was based on nothing but military propaganda. This research focused on how mainstream U.S. newspapers used news frames, overall story tone, and news sources before and after the official acknowledgement of the true cause of Tillman's death as fratricide. As hypothesized from C. Wright Mills' "lesser institutions," Antonio Gramsci's hegemony, and Edward S. Herman and Noam Chomsky's propaganda model, the newspapers generally decreased both direct and indirect references to news frames involving "lesser institutions" (e.g., NFL, Arizona State University) and ideological values (e.g., heroism, patriotism) after the revelation, but they were not critical of the Iraq/Afghanistan wars or the Bush administration at all. In addition, they increased their dependence on official sources and decreased family and friend sources after his cause of death was changed. The results as a whole indicate that in the Tillman saga, the revelation of his true cause of death introduced a significant disruption to the propaganda information system, causing news frames to decrease, but the third filter of the propaganda ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
An analysis of changes in perceptions of certified athletic trainers from 1996 to 2006 on the women in athletic training survey

An analysis of changes in perceptions of certified athletic trainers from 1996 to 2006 on the women in athletic training survey

Date: May 2007
Creator: Dieringer, Katherine I.
Description: This study investigates how perceptions vary in athletic trainers regarding issues pertaining to women in the profession. Subjects included 1500 male and 1500 female certified athletic trainers who responded to 44 demographic and perceptions survey items used to determine whether perceptions were different based on the respondent's gender. Results were compared to a previously disseminated survey in 1996 to also determine if perceptions had changed from 10 years earlier. Results regarding the presentation of awards and the attainment of leadership positions in the organization were also compared to actual data collected. The data suggested that males perceptions had not changed, but females' perceptions had changed, in that females perceived that opportunities had improved. Data regarding the number of females who had ascended to leadership positions or had received awards did not support these perceptions, however, and female athletic trainers continue to struggle to obtain equality in both of these areas. Additionally, homosocial reproduction continues to influence the decreased number of women who are hired into various jobs, or advance into leadership positions, maintaining patriarchy in the athletics arena and in the athletic training organizations. Results suggested that because athletic training has been dominated by men since its inception, patriarchy continues ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Masculinity Masquerade: the Portrayal of Men in Modern Advertising

The Masculinity Masquerade: the Portrayal of Men in Modern Advertising

Date: August 2013
Creator: Harper, Savannah
Description: The depiction of gender in advertising is a topic of continuous discussion and research. The present study adds to past findings with an updated look at how men are represented in U.S. advertising media and the real effects these portrayals have on the male population under the theoretical framework of hegemony and social cognitive theory. This research is triangulated with a textual analysis of the ads found in the March 2013 editions of four popular print publications and three focus group sessions separated by sex (two all-male, one all-female), each of which is composed of a racially diverse group of undergraduate journalism and communications students from a large Southwestern university. The results of the textual analysis reveal little ethnic or physical diversity among male figures in advertising and distinguish six main profiles of masculinity, the most frequent of which is described as the "sophisticated man." The focus groups identify depictions of extreme muscularity and stereotypical male incompetence as the most negative representations, while humorous and hyperbolic portrayals of sexual prowess and hyper-masculinity are viewed positively as effective means of marketing to men.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
JAC Audio Interview: Ernesto Laclau

JAC Audio Interview: Ernesto Laclau

Date: 1999
Creator: Worsham, Lynn; Olson, Gary A. & Laclau, Ernesto
Description: JAC interview of Ernesto Laclau discussing hegemony and democracy in relation to writing, philosophy, and rhetoric.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
JAC Audio Interview: Chantal Mouffe

JAC Audio Interview: Chantal Mouffe

Date: 1999
Creator: Worsham, Lynn; Olson, Gary A. & Mouffe, Chantal
Description: JAC interview of Chantal Mouffe discussing political theory in relation to writing, philosophy, and rhetoric.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
"They Don't Make'em Like They Used To": Cultural Hegemony and the Representation of White Masculinity in Recent U.S. Cinema

"They Don't Make'em Like They Used To": Cultural Hegemony and the Representation of White Masculinity in Recent U.S. Cinema

Date: December 2005
Creator: Schneider, Matthew
Description: The purpose of this work is to illuminate how white male hegemony over women and minorities is inscribed through the process of film representation. A critical interrogation of six film texts produced over the last decade yields pertinent examples of how the process of hegemonic negotiation works to maintain power for the ever changing modes of postindustrial masculinity. Through the process of crisis and recuperation the central male characters in these films forge new, more acceptable attributes of masculinity that allow them to retain their centrality in the narrative.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries