Millets.

Millets.

Date: 1899
Creator: United States. Department of Agriculture.
Description: Describes the different varieties of millets and how to grow them. Discusses the value of millets as livestock feed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The soy bean as a forage crop.

The soy bean as a forage crop.

Date: 1908
Creator: United States. Dept. of Agriculture.
Description: Describes soybean varieties, how to grow and harvest them, and their uses.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The feeding of farm animals.

The feeding of farm animals.

Date: 1909
Creator: United States. Dept. of Agriculture.
Description: Describes the basic principles of livestock feeding, based on results of agricultural experiments as well as the practices of successful feeders.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 47

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 47

Date: 1908
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Low-Grade v. High-Grade Fertilizers; Improvement of Sandy Soils; Dry Farming; Seed Selection; Evergreens: Uses and Culture; Nut Growing in Maryland; "Hogging Off" Corn; Mineral Matter in Feeding Stuff; Preparation of Miscible Oils; an Automatic Cheese Press; and Cane Sugar and Beet Sugar.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 46

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 46

Date: 1908
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Fish Fertilizer, Reclamation of Salt Marshes, Bermuda Hay, Protein Content of Forage Crops, Quality in Wheat, Potato Spraying, Anesthetics in Forcing Plants, Fattening Cattle for Market, Cottonseed Meal and Corn Silage for Cows, Carbonated Milk, and Preservation of Fence Posts.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 48

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 48

Date: 1908
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Plant Breeding on the Farm, Sorghum for Silage, Dry Rot of Corn, Starch from Sweet Potatoes, Profits from Tomato Growing, the Keeping of Apples, Weed Seeds in Manure, Weed Seeds in Feeding Stuffs, Forage Crops for Pigs, Market Classes and Grades of Horses and Mules, Profitable and Unprofitable Cows, Blackhead in Turkeys, Extraction of Beeswax, and an Improved Hog Cot.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 17

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 17

Date: 1901
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Distilled Drinking Water, Soil Inoculation, Treatment of Sandy Soils, Lime as a Fertilizer, Fertilizers for Market-Garden Crops, Pecan Culture, Weed Destruction, Maple Syrup and Sugar, Value of Cotton Seed, Alfalfa Silage, Forage Crops for Pigs, Grazing Steers, and Type of the Dairy Cow.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Corn and Cotton Wireworm in Its Relation to Cereal and Forage Crops, with Control Measures

The Corn and Cotton Wireworm in Its Relation to Cereal and Forage Crops, with Control Measures

Date: 1916
Creator: Gibson, Edmund H.
Description: "The object of this bulletin is to set forth in a popular form what is known of the habits of the destructive corn and cotton wireworm, in order that farmers and planters may more effectively carry out control measures and be able better to handle infested areas that the injury may be reduced to a minimum." -- title page.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
How to Control Billbugs Destructive to Cereal and Forage Crops

How to Control Billbugs Destructive to Cereal and Forage Crops

Date: 1932
Creator: Satterthwait, A. F.
Description: Revised edition. "Billbugs destroy or injure corn, wheat, rye, barley, oats, timothy, blue grass, Bermuda grass, Johnson grass, rice, sugar cane, peanuts and chufa. The most conspicuous damage by the adult billbugs is done to young corn plants. The most costly damage is undoubtedly that done by the larvae or grubs in cutting the underground portions of plants, especially those grown for hay and pasture. Billbugs have only one generation yearly and are generally dependent on grass sods or wild sedges and rushes. Corn, sugarcane, chufa, and timothy probably are the only crops in which they can perpetuate themselves within the plant tissues. The other host plants admit of inside feeding only during the early part of the grub stage, after which feeding is completed among the fibrous roots. Parasites are valuable natural checks, but their work follows, rather than prevents, crop loss. Clean cultivation, especially the complete elimination of wild sedges and rushes; suitable crop rotations; summer or early fall breaking of cultivated or infested wild sods; early planting of crops menaced by billbugs; and the protection of birds, especially ground feeders, including the bobwhite and the shore birds, are efficient means of preventing crop losses from billbugs. Hand ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
How to Control Billbugs Destructive to Cereal and Forage Crops

How to Control Billbugs Destructive to Cereal and Forage Crops

Date: 1919
Creator: Satterthwait, A. F.
Description: "Billbugs destroy or injure corn, wheat, rye, barley, oats, timothy, blue grass, Bermuda grass, Johnson grass, rice, sugar cane, peanuts and chufa. The best-known form of injury is corn leaf perforation. The principal losses are caused by combined injury by the adult billbugs and their young or larvae. The heaviest losses are probably in hay and pasturage. Billbugs have only one generation yearly and are generally dependent on grass sods or wild sedges and rushes. Corn, sugar cane, chufa, and timothy probably are our only crops in which they can perpetuate themselves within the plant tissues. Clean cultivation, especially the complete elimination of wild sedges and rushes, suitable crop rotations, summer or early fall breaking of cultivated or infested wild sods, early planting of crops menaced by billbugs, and the protection of birds, especially ground feeders, including the bobwhite and the shore birds, are efficient methods for preventing crop losses by billbugs. Parasites are valuable natural checks, but their work follows, rather than prevents, crop loss. Therefore, do not rely upon them to the neglect of control measures, or the results may be disastrous. Cooperate with your neighbors in active measures for destroying the billbugs." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 22

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 22

Date: 1903
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Pure Water for Cows; When to Cut Forage Crops; Lippia, or Fog Fruit; Pithiness in Celery; Irrigation of Strawberries; Farmers' Fruit Garden; Management of Orchards; Tropical and Subtropical Fruits; China Asters; Preserving Sweet Potatoes; Food Value of Beans; Tankage for Pigs; and Remedies for Fleas.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 60

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 60

Date: 1910
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Commercial Bean Growing, Digestion Experiments with Range Forage Crops, Stallion Legislation, Substitutes for Oats for Horses, Tests for Casein in MIlk
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 30

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 30

Date: 1905
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Top-Dressing Grass Land, Extension of Corn Growing, Peanuts for Forage, Winterkilling of Fruit Trees, Cranberry Culture, Lime-Sulphur-Salt Wash, Destroying Prairie Dogs, Clean Milk, Poultry Houses.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 7

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 7

Date: 1898
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Home-Mixed Fertilizers, Forcing Asparagus in the Field, Field Selection of Seed, Potatoes as Food for Man, Corn Stover as a Feeding Stuff, Feeding Value of Sugar Beets, Salt-Marsh Hay, Forage Crops for Pigs, Ground Grain for Chicks, Skim Milk for Young Chickens, By-Products of the Dairy, Stripper Butter, Curd Test in Cheese Making, Gape Disease of Chickens.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 35

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 35

Date: 1906
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Use of Commercial Fertilizers, Weight of Lime per Bushel, Spreading Lime, Soil Sterilization, Weights per Bushel of Seeds, Disease Resistant Crops, Corn Billibugs and Root-Louse, Asparagus Rust and Its Control, Alfalfa Meal as a Feeding Stuff, Singed Cacti as Forage, Cattle Feeding in the South, Milk Fever, Nail Wounds in Horses' Feet, and Use of a Cheap Canning Outfit.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Harvesting and Storing Corn

Harvesting and Storing Corn

Date: 1907
Creator: Hartley, C. P.
Description: "The production of a large crop is of course the subject of most importance in corn growing, but there is need of much care and labor in harvesting and storing the crop after it is produced in order to obtain its maximum value." -- p. 7. Topics discussed include silos, times and methods of cutting, shocking, husking, use of machines, and different storage practices.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Best Two Sweet Sorghums for Forage

The Best Two Sweet Sorghums for Forage

Date: 1911
Creator: Conner, A. B.
Description: "At this time the several different sorghum varieties are grown promiscuously over the entire region adapted to this crop. This bulletin is prepared with a view to helping the farmer find the variety [of sorghum] best suited to his region and to grow and improve this variety so as to obtain better yields of forage." -- p. 2.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Cowpeas

Cowpeas

Date: 1899
Creator: Smith, Jared G. (Jared Gage), 1866-1957
Description: Report promoting the cultivation of the cowpea as a forage plant because of it adaptability to a wide variety of soils and agricultural conditions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Forage Crops and Their Culture in Northern Nebraska and the Dakotas

Forage Crops and Their Culture in Northern Nebraska and the Dakotas

Date: 1927
Creator: Garver, Samuel
Description: "This bulletin deals with those cultivated forage crops that seem of greatest promise for the dry-farming districts of northern Nebraska and the Dakotas west of the ninety-eighth meridian. Frequent crop failures in the more arid portions of these States result from a low annual precipitation, the irregularity of its amount and distribution during the growing season, and high evaporation. Under conditions of extreme drought, cultivated crops can seldom be economically substituted for native vegetation, and the utilization of such lands for grazing and the cutting of wild hay is most generally advisable. Greater forage production on the better lands may be effected by growing certain cultivated legumes, grasses, and roots." -- p. ii.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Forage Crops for Hogs in Kansas and Oklahoma

Forage Crops for Hogs in Kansas and Oklahoma

Date: 1908
Creator: Quinn, C. E.
Description: Report discussing forage crops commonly grown for hog feed in Kansas and Oklahoma. Among the more important crops are alfalfa, wheat, oats, and rye, while less important forage crops include clovers, rape, sorghum, cowpeas, Canadian field peas, soy beans, grasses, root crops, and pumpkins. There is also a brief discussion of systems of hog feeding and pasturing, particularly in Oklahoma.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Lespedeza, or Japan Clover

Lespedeza, or Japan Clover

Date: 1911
Creator: McNair, A. D. & Mercier, W. B. (William Benjamin), b. 1868
Description: Report discussing the uses of and practices for cultivating lespedeza (also known as Japanese clover).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Saccharine Sorghums for Forage

Saccharine Sorghums for Forage

Date: 1906
Creator: Ball, Carleton R. (Carleton Roy), 1873-1958
Description: Report discussing the use of saccharine sorghum for forage, including classification of different varieties of sorghum, climate and soil conditions for growing, and methods of cultivations. Sorghum may be used for soiling (or green feeding), pastures, hay, fodder, and silage among other possibilities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Timothy

Timothy

Date: 1918
Creator: Evans, Morgan W.
Description: "Timothy, usually seeded in mixture with clover, is grown in rotations with other crops on most of the farms in the northeastern fourth of the United States. Timothy is usually seeded with some grain as a nurse crop. Winter wheat and rye are generally better nurse crops than oats or other spring grains. Timothy seeded alone in late August or early September will produce a crop of clear timothy hay the following season. Fertilizers applied on corn, wheat, or other crops grown in rotation with timothy increase the following hay crops. Farm manure or nitrate of soda applied as a top-dressing on meadow is very effective in increasing the yields of timothy. As a rule, timothy should be harvested for hay after the plants have passed out of full bloom and before any of the heads on the earliest plants have begun to turn brown and before the seed has begun to mature." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Wireworms Destructive to Cereal and Forage Crops

Wireworms Destructive to Cereal and Forage Crops

Date: 1916
Creator: Hyslop, J. A.
Description: "The purpose of this bulletin is to enable farmers to distinguish between the different kinds of wireworms, so that they can make use of the methods shown to be best in the control of each.... The species here treated are the wheat wireworm of the Northeastern and Middle Western States, the corn wireworms of the Middle Atlantic and New England States and the Mississippi Valley, the meadow wireworms (including the sugar-beet wireworm and the confused wireworm), the corn and cotton wireworm of the Southern States, and the dry-land wireworm and inflated wireworm of the dry-farming region of the Northwest and the wheat regions of the Northern Middle West." -- title page
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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