"Stately Temples": Consubstantiality and Consciousness in Frances E. W. Harper's Iola Leroy; or Shadows Uplifted

"Stately Temples": Consubstantiality and Consciousness in Frances E. W. Harper's Iola Leroy; or Shadows Uplifted

Date: August 1996
Creator: Louis-Ray, Deborah
Description: The purpose of this master's thesis is to examine Frances Harper's narrative strategy and moral didacticism in Iola Leroy: or Shadows Uplifted (1892) as she strives to achieve consubstantiality and a "heightened consciousness" within her characters and her audience while adhering to the literary and feminist paradigms of the late nineteenth century. Harper identifies with her African-American male audience's dilemma of "double-consciousness" and their veil of androcentrism. She also identifies with her Euro-American female audience's delicate and matriarchal roles, while also attempting to uplift their position of the "Other" to the "One." Finally, with her African-American female audience, Harper identifies with their complex situatedness of "double-consciousness" and the "Other," while also attempting to uplift them from a historically imposed position of selflessness to one of empowerment.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
An Analysis of Sexist Language in ESL Textbooks by Thai Authors Used in Thailand

An Analysis of Sexist Language in ESL Textbooks by Thai Authors Used in Thailand

Date: August 2008
Creator: Na Pattalung, Piengpen
Description: This study identified the types of sexist language that appear in ESL textbooks by Thai authors. The study analyzed the ESL textbooks by Thai authors sold at the Chulalongkorn University bookstore during spring 2007. It was a qualitative case analysis of fifteen ESL textbooks covering the beginning, intermediate, and advanced levels of ESL instruction. The study used feminist criticism to discover what gender roles are sanctioned as appropriate in ESL textbooks by Thai authors and if the language used supports or challenges patriarchy. The results of this study show that sexist language is present in the textbooks and that the textbooks contain content that promotes sexist assumptions concerning gender roles. As a whole, the language and examples used in ESL textbooks by Thai authors support patriarchy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Pride and sexual friendship: The battle of the sexes in Nietzsche's post-democratic world.

Pride and sexual friendship: The battle of the sexes in Nietzsche's post-democratic world.

Date: August 2008
Creator: Yancy, Lisa Fleck Uhlir
Description: This dissertation addresses an ignored [partly for its controversial nature] aspect of Nietzschean philosophy: that of the role of modern woman in the creation of a future horizon. Details of the effects of the Enlightenment, Christianity and democracy upon society are discussed, as well as effects on the individual, particularly woman. After this forward look at the changes anticipated by Nietzsche, the traditional roles of woman as the eternal feminine, wife and mother are debated. An argument for the necessity of a continuation of the battle of the sexes, and the struggle among men and women in a context of sexual love and friendship is given. This mutual affirmation must occur through the motivation of pride and not vanity. In conclusion, I argue that one possible avenue for change is a Nietzschean call for a modern revaluation of values by noble woman in conjugation with her warrior scholar to bring about the elevation of mankind.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Animals-as-Trope in the Selected Fiction of Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison

Animals-as-Trope in the Selected Fiction of Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: August 1999
Creator: Erickson, Stacy M.
Description: In this dissertation, I show how 20th century African-American women writers such as Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison utilize animals-as-trope in order to illustrate the writers' humanity and literary vision. In the texts that I have selected, I have found that animals-as-trope functions in two important ways: the first function of animal as trope is a pragmatic one, which serves to express the humanity of African Americans; and the second function of animal tropes in African-American women's fiction is relational and expresses these writers' "ethic of caring" that stems from their folk and womanist world view. Found primarily in slave narratives and in domestic fiction of the 19th and early 20th centuries, pragmatic animal metaphors and/or similes provide direct analogies between the treatment of African-Americans and animals. Here, these writers often engage in rhetoric that challenges pro-slavery apologists, who attempted to disprove the humanity of African-Americans by portraying them as animals fit to be enslaved. Animals, therefore, become the metaphor of both the abolitionist and the slavery apologist for all that is not human. The second function of animals-as-trope in the fiction of African-American women writers goes beyond the pragmatic goal of proving African-Americans's common humanity, even ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Mariama Bâ: un féminisme né à l'intersection de deux cultures.

Mariama Bâ: un féminisme né à l'intersection de deux cultures.

Date: August 2006
Creator: Perret, Arnaud
Description: Many critics consider Mariama Bâ as a feminist writer, but the reader of her two novels might wonder what characterizes her work as such. Therefore, the aim of each chapter, in order of appearance, is to analyze first the genres, then the elements of African tradition and Western modernity, the characters of both works and the themes of the novels, with the intention of defining the author's feminism, which takes its source in dichotomies, paradoxes and contradictions. In order to expose the author's point of view on the condition of women, it appears important to situate the diegesis in its context. Also, the study is supported by references on the Senegalese culture, by genres, narrative and feminist theories and by critiques on the work itself.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Beggars, Brides, and Bards: The Political Philosophy of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew

Beggars, Brides, and Bards: The Political Philosophy of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew

Date: August 2011
Creator: Murphy, Stephanie Miranda
Description: To do justice to Shakespeare’s comprehensive moral and political thought this paper seeks to discover what we can learn from the political philosophy of his largely neglected comedy, Taming of the Shrew. Not only does this endeavor provide a valuable forgotten link within the critical analyses of the theorists, but it also corrects the various misinterpretations of the play among contemporary critics. I argue that the play surveys various key themes that are rooted in classical political philosophy – such as education, the problems of anger, and the dynamic between nature and convention – and takes into consideration how they apply to modern man. Shakespeare borrows Plato’s idea that eroticism is central to education and explicitly references Ovid’s love books to reexamine our conceptions about one’s formation of character, the proper standards for judging the ideal mate, and the effects of these issues on the stability of the community. I also submit an innovative explanation of the relation between the induction and the main plot. Taken together they exhibit a critique of the role of the poet and his art in modern civil society.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory, Volume 20, Number 3, Summer 2000

JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory, Volume 20, Number 3, Summer 2000

Date: 2000
Creator: Association of Teachers of Advanced Composition (U.S.)
Description: JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory contains a collection of papers regarding writing and rhetoric: "The JAC is a forum for theory, research and pedagogy regarding (1) those writing courses beyond the freshman courses, excluding technical and creative writing, (2) writing in courses which are not themselves writing courses, particularly in the liberal arts and sciences, and (3) work in theory, research or pedagogy which is advanced or progressive and will shed light on the field as a whole while at the same time providing insights for advanced composition" (volume 1, number 1).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory, Volume 22, Number 2, Spring 2002

JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory, Volume 22, Number 2, Spring 2002

Date: 2002
Creator: Association of Teachers of Advanced Composition (U.S.)
Description: JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory contains a collection of papers regarding writing and rhetoric: "The JAC is a forum for theory, research and pedagogy regarding (1) those writing courses beyond the freshman courses, excluding technical and creative writing, (2) writing in courses which are not themselves writing courses, particularly in the liberal arts and sciences, and (3) work in theory, research or pedagogy which is advanced or progressive and will shed light on the field as a whole while at the same time providing insights for advanced composition" (volume 1, number 1).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory, Volume 18, Number 3, 1998

JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory, Volume 18, Number 3, 1998

Date: 1998
Creator: Association of Teachers of Advanced Composition (U.S.)
Description: JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory contains a collection of papers regarding writing and rhetoric: "The JAC is a forum for theory, research and pedagogy regarding (1) those writing courses beyond the freshman courses, excluding technical and creative writing, (2) writing in courses which are not themselves writing courses, particularly in the liberal arts and sciences, and (3) work in theory, research or pedagogy which is advanced or progressive and will shed light on the field as a whole while at the same time providing insights for advanced composition" (volume 1, number 1).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Always Painting the Future: Utopian Desire and the Women's Movement in Selected Works by United States Female Writers at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Always Painting the Future: Utopian Desire and the Women's Movement in Selected Works by United States Female Writers at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

Date: August 2009
Creator: Balic, Iva
Description: This study explores six utopias by female authors written at the turn of the twentieth century: Mary Bradley Lane's Mizora (1881), Alice Ilgenfritz Jones and Ella Merchant's Unveiling Parallel (1893), Eloise O. Richberg's Reinstern (1900), Lena J. Fry's Other Worlds (1905), Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Herland (1915), and Martha Bensley Bruère's Mildred Carver, USA (1919). While the right to vote had become the central, most important point of the movement, women were concerned with many other issues affecting their lives. Positioned within the context of the late nineteenth century women's rights movement, this study examines these "sideline" concerns of the movement such as home and gender-determined spheres, motherhood, work, marriage, independence, and self-sufficiency and relates them to the transforming character of female identity at the time. The study focuses primarily on analyzing the expression of female historical desire through utopian genre and on explicating the contradictory nature of utopian production.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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