The Effects of Feedback from the Use of Interaction Analysis in Supervising Student Teachers

The Effects of Feedback from the Use of Interaction Analysis in Supervising Student Teachers

Date: August 1967
Creator: Ledbetter, Howard Payne, 1928-
Description: The problem is to determine the feasibility of using student teacher observer teams trained in interaction analysis to develop the capacity of student teachers to change their classroom verbal behavior.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of Observational Feedback on Verbal and Nonverbal Classroom Behavior of Student Teachers

Effects of Observational Feedback on Verbal and Nonverbal Classroom Behavior of Student Teachers

Date: August 1968
Creator: Furr, Oneta Roberts
Description: The central problem of this study was to determine the effects of feedback of observations recorded by an elementary college supervisor for the verbal and nonverbal classroom behavior of elementary student teachers.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Performance measurement, feedback, and reward processes in research and development work teams: Effects on perceptions of performance

Performance measurement, feedback, and reward processes in research and development work teams: Effects on perceptions of performance

Date: December 2000
Creator: Roberts, M. Koy
Description: Organizations have had difficulty managing the performance of their knowledge work teams. Many of these troubles have been linked to antiquated or inadequate performance management systems along with a scarcity of empirical research on this important human resource initiative. These problems are magnified when managing the performance of research and development teams because greater ambiguity and uncertainty exists in these environments, while projects are unique and continually evolving. In addition, performance management in R&D has only recently been accepted as important while individuals in these settings are often resistant to teams. This study represented the first step in the process of understanding relationships between performance management practices and perceptions of performance in R&D work teams. Participants were 132 R&D team leaders representing 20 organizations that agreed to complete a survey via the Internet. The survey instrument was designed to examine the relationships between performance measurement, feedback, and reward processes utilized by teams in relation to measures of customer satisfaction, psychological and team effectiveness, and resource utilization and development. The most important level of performance measurement occurred at the business unit level followed next by the individual level while team level measurement was unrelated to team performance. A simple measurement system ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Should Corrective Feedback Come Before or After Responding to Establish a "New" Behavior?

Should Corrective Feedback Come Before or After Responding to Establish a "New" Behavior?

Date: December 1997
Creator: Roberts, Pamela J.
Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal form and timing of feedback to establish a "new" behavior. It examined the relative effectiveness of delivering a corrective feedback immediately before the learner responds to a previously incorrect trial as compared to delivering a corrective feedback immediately after the incorrect response is made. Corrective feedback delivered immediately before the next opportunity to respond produced better learning than corrective feedback delivered immediately after a response. The Feedback Before condition decreased errors during training and increased acquisition rates. Results also indicated an interaction between time of feedback delivery and the complexity of the task. As the task complexity increased, the results were more dramatic in favor of the Feedback Before condition.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Computer virus spread containment using feedback control.

Computer virus spread containment using feedback control.

Date: December 2004
Creator: Yelimeli Guruprasad, Arun
Description: In this research, a security architecture based on the feedback control theory has been proposed. The first loop has been designed, developed and tested. The architecture proposes a feedback model with many controllers located at different stages of network. The controller at each stage gives feedback to the one at higher level and a decision about network security is taken. The first loop implemented in this thesis detects one important anomaly of virus attack, rate of outgoing connection. Though there are other anomalies of a virus attack, rate of outgoing connection is an important one to contain the spread. Based on the feedback model, this symptom is fed back and a state model using queuing theory is developed to delay the connections and slow down the rate of outgoing connections. Upon implementation of this model, whenever an infected machine tries to make connections at a speed not considered safe, the controller kicks in and sends those connections to a delay queue. Because of delaying connections, rate of outgoing connections decrease. Also because of delaying, many connections timeout and get dropped, reducing the spread. PID controller is implemented to decide the number of connections going to safe or suspected queue. Multiple ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Control of chaos in a CO2 laser

Control of chaos in a CO2 laser

Date: September 5, 1994
Creator: Pérez, José M.; Steinshnider, J.; Stallcup, Richard E. & Aviles, A. F.
Description: Article discussing research on control of chaos in a CO2 laser.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Toward a functional approach to goal setting

Toward a functional approach to goal setting

Date: December 2007
Creator: Isley, Shane D.
Description: A variable that may be associated with performance improvements is goal setting (within and across days). Easy-to-achieve goals will likely produce gradual trends in improvement and difficult-to-achieve goals steeper trends. The purpose of the current experiments was to study the effects of setting easy-to-achieve and difficult-to-achieve goals on the level, trend, and variability of correct, incorrect, and skip responses for math tasks when reinforcement contingencies and numbers of practices were held constant. Five undergraduate students answered math problems on flash cards in 30s timings. Single case design elements were used to evaluate the effects of different types of goals on the speed and accuracy of performance. The results revealed that goal setting primarily increased the frequency of incorrect responses and both the level and trend of skip responses. The implications of these findings and other important variables that influence the effectiveness of goal setting are discussed. In addition, the authors suggest guidelines to follow when implementing goals to improve performance.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Improving management systems in a public school in-home autism services program.

Improving management systems in a public school in-home autism services program.

Date: December 2006
Creator: White, Victoria Anne
Description: The purpose of this study was to develop and examine the effects of enhanced training and performance management methods for an autism coordinator who managed several paraprofessional therapists providing in-home behavior therapy for young children with autism. Intervention included task clarification, targeted skill development, and improved feedback from the coordinator to the therapists. Results showed that service delivery performance of in-home trainers increased and/or became more consistent after the intervention was implemented. The intervention provided the autism coordinator with an empirically validated training and feedback system that can be successfully utilized in a sporadically supervised environment.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effects of goal setting, e-mail feedback and graphic feedback on the productivity of public school attendance clerks

Effects of goal setting, e-mail feedback and graphic feedback on the productivity of public school attendance clerks

Date: August 2000
Creator: Rexroat, Robin D.
Description: A package intervention, consisting of daily-adjusted goal setting, e-mail feedback, and graphic feedback, was used in a public school attendance office to increase the efficiency with which 3 attendance clerks documented student attendance. During the intervention phase, the attendance secretary set a daily goal for each attendance clerk. This goal was a percentage of student absences to be coded and entered in the school computer program. After establishing a daily goal, the attendance secretary provided daily feedback, in the form of a written e-mail response and graphed feedback to each clerk. If the subjects had attained their daily goal, the attendance secretary also delivered a praise statement along with the e-mail feedback. Results indicated that the intervention package was ineffective in producing change in the attendance clerks' absence coding behavior.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Teacher Training: An Examination of Skill Acquisition, Generalization, and Increases in Child Appropriate Behavior

Teacher Training: An Examination of Skill Acquisition, Generalization, and Increases in Child Appropriate Behavior

Date: August 2000
Creator: Sawyer, Rebecca Jo Moore
Description: The effects of a training package (modeling, role-playing, and feedback) were evaluated using a multiple baseline across skill areas. Two trainers taught two teachers to use basic intervention skills that included components of both discrete trial teaching (DTT) and the Natural Language Paradigm (NLP). Training occurred in the context of one task. Generalization was assessed with two untrained tasks. Teachers' responses in the target task increased following training, as did appropriate responding from the child. Some generalization of the teaching skills occurred. Teachers were instructed to generalize acquired skills as a possible method to promote generalization. The results of these findings and implications for training of ABA providers are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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