UNT Research, Volume 16, 2006

UNT Research, Volume 16, 2006

Date: 2006
Creator: University of North Texas
Description: UNT Research magazine includes articles and notes about research at University of North Texas in various academic fields.
Contributing Partner: University Relations, Communications & Marketing department for UNT
Social Vulnerability and Faith in Disasters: an Investigation Into the Role of Religion in New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina

Social Vulnerability and Faith in Disasters: an Investigation Into the Role of Religion in New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina

Date: May 2012
Creator: Herring, Alison M.
Description: Disasters are an ever increasing phenomena in our society, resulting in many people being adversely affected. the social vulnerability paradigm explores the social, economic and political factors which contribute to certain populations being disproportionately affected by disasters. However, the paradigm has not yet begun to investigate the cultural or religious ideologies which may affect a population's behavior in disaster. This study is an exploratory investigation into whether religious ideologies may impact a person's decision to prepare, or not, in the event of a disaster. Specifically, it seeks to investigate whether a person who holds a belief that natural disasters are under God's control will prepare for the hazard? the study undertaken five years after Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans show that religious ideology is closely linked with one's capacity to prepare for the hazard which is closely tied in with social structure. It may appear that a person's 'fatalistic' attitude is tied to economic inability to prepare for a hazard. This does not mean that they will not prepare but that preparation may include prayer as their initial attempt to mitigate.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Situational Small World of a Post-disaster Community: Insights into Information Behaviors after the Devastation of Hurricane Katrina in Slidell, Louisiana

The Situational Small World of a Post-disaster Community: Insights into Information Behaviors after the Devastation of Hurricane Katrina in Slidell, Louisiana

Date: December 2010
Creator: Slagle, Tisha Anne
Description: Catastrophes like Katrina destroy a community's critical infrastructure-a situation that instigates several dilemmas. Immediately, the community experiences information disruption within the community, as well as between the community and the outside world. The inability to communicate because of physical or virtual barriers to information instigates instant isolation. Prolonged, this scarcity of information becomes an information poverty spell, placing hardship on a community accustomed to easily accessible and applicable information. Physical devastation causes the scarcity of what Abraham Maslow calls basic survival needs-physiological, security, and social-a needs regression from the need to self-actualize, to meet intellectual and aesthetic needs. Because needs regress, the type of information required to meet the needs, also changes-regresses to information regarding survival needs. Regressed information needs requires altered information behaviors-altered methods and means to meet the information needs of the post-disaster situation. Situational information behavior follows new mores-altered norms-norms constructed for the post-disaster situation. To justify the unconventional, situational social norms, residents must adjust their beliefs about appropriate behavior. Situational beliefs support situational social norms-and situational information behaviors prevail. Residents find they must trust strangers, create makeshift messaging systems, and in some cases, disregard the law to meet their post-disaster survival needs.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
National Commission on Children and Disasters

National Commission on Children and Disasters

Date: 2009
Creator: National Commission on Children and Disasters (U.S.)
Description: This website contains information about the National Commission on Children and Disasters and its findings, including the final report, "2010 Report to the President and Congress," published in October 2010. The commission was formed to conduct a study to examine specific needs for children regarding disaster preparation, response, and recovery; to identify and evaluate existing legislation and programs which address those needs; to identify and evaluate information from past disasters; and to report to the President and Congress about the findings.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Juvenile Delinquents are especially disadvantaged in times of Disaster

Juvenile Delinquents are especially disadvantaged in times of Disaster

Date: April 19, 2012
Creator: Smith, Bridgette; Arlikatti, Sudha & Eve, Susan Brown
Description: In this presentation, the author discusses research on the following questions: How prone to special risks are children (18 years and younger) in times of disaster? How is this further exacerbated with children who are classified as juvenile delinquents? How prepared is the juvenile justice system for disasters? What are the implications of being underprepared? What are the resources available for juvenile delinquents in times of disaster?
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
Organizational Perceptions of Women's Vulnerability to Violence in the Wake of Disaster

Organizational Perceptions of Women's Vulnerability to Violence in the Wake of Disaster

Date: August 1995
Creator: Wilson, Jennifer L. (Jennifer Lyn)
Description: Women as a group hold little power in the social system which increases women's vulnerability to domestic violence. According to Merton (1970), social problems may be revealed through the disaster recovery process. A coraHunity1s organizational response to social problems such as wife abuse depends upon organizational members' perceptions. The data suggest that organizational perceptions of domestic violence largely depend upon the setting or environment in which an organization exists and operates. A second factor that greatly determines an organization's perception of domestic violence after disaster is organizational type. Organizations which provide services to domestic violence victims pre-disaster are more likely to perceive domestic violence following disaster than organizations which do not provide domestic violence related services prior to disaster.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Community Resilience in Thailand: a Case Study of Flood Response in Nakhonsawan City Municipality

Community Resilience in Thailand: a Case Study of Flood Response in Nakhonsawan City Municipality

Date: May 2013
Creator: Khunwishit, Somporn
Description: Natural disasters such as flooding often affect vast areas and create infinite demands that need to be addressed in the same time. The wide scopes and severe impacts of such catastrophes often exceed, if not overwhelm, capacity of the national government to handle. In such a situation, communities such as cities and neighborhoods need to rely on their own capacity (resources, strategies, and expertise) to respond to disaster impacts at least until external assistance can be reached. Thus, studying how communities can be resilient to the impacts of natural disasters is important because this would enhance their ability to respond to the next disaster better. Within the context of great flooding in Thailand in 2011, this dissertation investigated the factors that generated or enhanced resilience of flood stricken-communities in Thailand. Nakhonswan City Municipality was selected as the research site. Qualitative research methods were employed in this study. Data were collected using in-depth interview and focus group. Thirty-six participants (28 for in-depth interview and 8 for focus group interview) from various organizations were recruited using snowball and purposive sampling strategies. Interview data from the field research were transcribed, translated from Thai language to English, and then analyzed using open coding and ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Willingness of Older Adults to Evacuate in the Event of a Disaster

The Willingness of Older Adults to Evacuate in the Event of a Disaster

Date: May 2009
Creator: Gray-Graves, Amy Michael
Description: The issue of rising number of disasters, the overwhelming increase in number of older adults, and historically flawed evacuations presents real challenges. Disasters can strike anywhere, any time, and have devastating consequences. Since 1900, the number of Americans 65 and older has increased 12 times (from 3.1 million to 36.3 million). During the next two decades, the number of American baby boomers, now aged 45-64, who turn 65, will increase by 40%. As evidenced by recent disasters, the imperfections and vulnerabilities of flawed evacuations for older adults are still present. This study examined the level of willingness to evacuate among older adults in the event of a disaster. Despite the extensive literature on disasters and evacuation, some significant questions regarding evacuation and older adults have not been addressed. This study addressed the following concerns: (1) What is the willingness among older adults to evacuate when asked to do so by emergency management officials? (2) Does the call to evacuate being mandatory versus voluntary influence the willingness of seniors to evacuate? (3) Do preconditions (Gender, Marital Status, Age, Ethnic Origin, and Education Levels) influence the willingness to evacuate among older adults? The sample population consisted of 765 voluntary participants aged 60 ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries