Folksonomy

Folksonomy

Date: July 2, 2008
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw
Description: This Tech Talk presentation explores Folksonomy. The author explores some of the more common aspects of folksonomies in the context of Web 2.0.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Maintaining Quality Metadata: Toward Effective Digital Resource Lifecycle Management

Maintaining Quality Metadata: Toward Effective Digital Resource Lifecycle Management

Date: 2008
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw
Description: Book chapter on maintaining quality metadata and effective digital resource lifecycle management.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Effective Tools for Digital Object Management

Effective Tools for Digital Object Management

Date: 2009
Creator: Moore, Jeremy D. & Fisher, Sarah Lynn
Description: This presentation discusses the University of North Texas Libraries' Digital Projects Unit workflow for digitization, including organizing materials, using a Wiki project page, internal workflow, managing objects and identifiers, and using a Magick Numbering system.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Does Every Research Library Need a  Digital Humanities Center?

Does Every Research Library Need a Digital Humanities Center?

Date: February 2014
Creator: Schaffner, Jennifer & Erway, Ricky
Description: The essay discusses specific concerns of digital humanists in hopes of bridging the gap between how library directors and digital humanities researchers think. It suggests many ways to respond to the needs of digital humanists, and creating a Digital Humanities center is appropriate in relatively few circumstances. The essay recommends that a “Digital Humanities-friendly” environment may be more effective than a Digital Humanities Center but that library culture may need to evolve in order for librarians to be seen as effective Digital Humanities partners. The authors conclude that what we call “The Digital Humanities” today will soon be considered “The Humanities.” Supporting Digital Humanities scholarship is not much different than supporting digital scholarship in any discipline. Increasingly, digital scholarship is simply scholarship.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Born Digital: Guidance for Donors, Dealers, and Archival Repositories

Born Digital: Guidance for Donors, Dealers, and Archival Repositories

Date: October 2013
Creator: Redwine, Gabriela; Barnard, Megan; Donovan, Kate; Farr, Erika; Forstrom, Michael; Hansen, Will et al.
Description: The report provides recommendations to help ensure the physical and intellectual well-being of materials created and managed in digital form ("born digital") that are transferred from donors to archival repositories. The report is presented in four sections, each of which provides an overview of a key area of concern: initial collection review, privacy and intellectual property, key stages in acquiring digital materials, and post-acquisition review by the repository. Each section concludes with two lists of recommendations: one for donors and dealers, and a second for repository staff. Appendixes provide more specific information about possible staffing activities, as well as a list of resources and ready-to-use checklists that incorporate recommendations from throughout the report. Ten archivists and curators from institutions in the United States and United Kingdom collaborated on the report.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Searching for  Sustainability:  Strategies  from Eight  Digitized Special  Collections

Searching for Sustainability: Strategies from Eight Digitized Special Collections

Date: November 2013
Creator: Maron, Nancy & Pickle, Sarah
Description: This report aims to address one of the biggest challenges facing libraries and cultural heritage organizations: how to move their special collections into the 21st century through digitization while developing successful strategies to make sure those collections remain accessible and relevant over time. Through a cooperative agreement as part of the National Leadership Grants Program, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) funded the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), in partnership with Ithaka S+R, to undertake in-depth case studies of institutions that have worked to build the audience, infrastructure, and funding models necessary to maintain and grow their digital collections. The eight collections profiled provide useful models and examples of good practice for project leaders to consider when digitizing their own materials. We hope that these case studies will encourage greater discussion among individuals in the academic library and cultural heritage communities about the reasons why they invest so much time and energy in the creation and ongoing management of their digitized special collections, the goals they set for them, and the planning needed to realize those aims. These questions become even more pressing in an environment where the traditional sources of funding for digitization are beginning to wane. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Appraising our digital investment : sustainability of digitized special collections in ARL libraries

Appraising our digital investment : sustainability of digitized special collections in ARL libraries

Date: February 2013
Creator: Maron, Nancy & Pickle, Sarah
Description: Sponsored by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and conducted by Ithaka S+R, this study provides insight into how ARL libraries are managing and funding the hundreds of digitized special collections they have created and that they believe to be critical to their futures. This is the first survey of ARL institutions that specifically attempts to understand and benchmark the activities and costs of supporting these collections after they are created. By looking at questions of management, costs, funding sources, impact, and outreach, the survey offers data that will deliver insight to all those engaged in sustaining digitized special collections.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Policy Guidelines for the Development and Promotion of Open Access

Policy Guidelines for the Development and Promotion of Open Access

Date: 2012
Creator: Swan, Alma
Description: UNESCO issued this publication to demystify the concept of Open Access (OA) and to provide concrete steps on putting relevant policies in place. Building capacities in Member States for Open Access is a necessary but not sufficient condition for promotion of the concept. Creating an enabling policy environment for OA is therefore a priority. This publication will serve the needs of OA policy development at the government, institutional and funding agency level. The overall objective of the Policy Guidelines is to promote Open Access in Member States by facilitating understanding of all relevant issues related to Open Access. The guidelines are not prescriptive in nature, but are suggestive to facilitate knowledge-based decision-making to adopt OA policies and strengthen national research systems.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Future is in the Preservation Metadata

The Future is in the Preservation Metadata

Date: 2003
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw
Description: This presentation discusses the issue of digital preservation and how metadata provides a critical part of the solution to the preservation challenges from detecting preservation threats to promoting preventative measures.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Meeting the Digital Resource Preservation Challenges: The University of North Texas Libraries Initiative

Meeting the Digital Resource Preservation Challenges: The University of North Texas Libraries Initiative

Date: 2002
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw & Hartman, Cathy Nelson
Description: This presentation describes the University of North Texas Libraries' initiatives to ensure long-term access to various digital resources.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Maintaining Quality Metadata: Toward Effective Digital Resource Lifecycle Management

Maintaining Quality Metadata: Toward Effective Digital Resource Lifecycle Management

Date: 2008
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw
Description: This presentation discusses the critical issues of metadata quality in digital libraries and describes the efforts being made by the University of North Texas Libraries to ensure metadata quality at various levels of digital resources' life cycle.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Integrating Folksonomies into Cultural Heritage Digital Collections: The Challenges and Opportunities of Web 2.0

Integrating Folksonomies into Cultural Heritage Digital Collections: The Challenges and Opportunities of Web 2.0

Date: 2008
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw & Hastings, Samantha Kelly
Description: In this presentation, the author defines Folksonomy and the advantages and disadvantages of Folksonomy. He begins with a background on information retrieval and changing technologies, discusses trends in technologies, and explains the use of tags and Folksonomy.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Metadata Quality: A Phased Approach to Ensuring Long-Term Access to Digital Resources

Metadata Quality: A Phased Approach to Ensuring Long-Term Access to Digital Resources

Date: 2009
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw
Description: Paper accompanying a poster presentation at the 2009 ASIS&T Annual Meeting. This paper discusses metadata quality and a phased approach to ensuring long-term access to digital resources.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Metadata Quality: A Phased Approach to Ensuring Long-Term Access to Digital Resources [Poster]

Metadata Quality: A Phased Approach to Ensuring Long-Term Access to Digital Resources [Poster]

Date: 2009
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw
Description: Poster presented at the 2009 ASIS&T Annual Meeting. This poster discusses how an effective metadata management approach can help institutions improve consistency, clarity of lineage, and relationships to that they can better use, reuse, and integrate resources.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Repurposing Existing Digital Resources and Smoothing Interdisciplinary Communication: Environmental Policy Collection Development [Poster]

Repurposing Existing Digital Resources and Smoothing Interdisciplinary Communication: Environmental Policy Collection Development [Poster]

Date: October 2012
Creator: Hall, Nathan; Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw & Phillips, Mark Edward
Description: This poster presents discussion on repurposing existing digital resources and smoothing interdisciplinary communication.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Handbook of Texas: Past and Future

The Handbook of Texas: Past and Future

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Calder, J. Kent
Description: Presentation for the 2012 Digital Frontiers Conference. The central challenge before the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) is to seize the unprecedented opportunities of the 'Handbook of Texas' in the digital age in order to reshape how history will be accessed, disseminated, understood, and preserved in the twenty-first century. This presentation describes how the TSHA is facing the challenges along with its plans to realize the opportunities.
Contributing Partner: Texas State Historical Association
Targeted Access for Varied Audiences to Integrated, Heterogeneous Digital Information Resources

Targeted Access for Varied Audiences to Integrated, Heterogeneous Digital Information Resources

Date: 2003
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw; Hartman, Cathy Nelson & Hastings, Samantha Kelly
Description: Paper accompanying a poster presentation for the 2003 ASIS&T Annual Conference. This paper describes the University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries' Portal to Texas History project, which aims to integrate and ensuer long-term access to large quantities of heterogeneous digital resources from many different institutions.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Beginner’s Guide to Persistent Identifiers

A Beginner’s Guide to Persistent Identifiers

Date: February 2014
Creator: Schaffner, Jennifer & Erway, Ricky
Description: The essay discusses specific concerns of digital humanists in hopes of bridging the gap between how library directors and digital humanities researchers think. It suggests many ways to respond to the needs of digital humanists, and creating a Digital Humanities center is appropriate in relatively few circumstances. The essay recommends that a “Digital Humanities-friendly” environment may be more effective than a Digital Humanities Center but that library culture may need to evolve in order for librarians to be seen as effective Digital Humanities partners. The authors conclude that what we call “The Digital Humanities” today will soon be considered “The Humanities.” Supporting Digital Humanities scholarship is not much different than supporting digital scholarship in any discipline. Increasingly, digital scholarship is simply scholarship.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Enhancing Content Visibility in Institutional Repositories: Overview of Factors that Affect Digital Resources Discoverability [Poster]

Enhancing Content Visibility in Institutional Repositories: Overview of Factors that Affect Digital Resources Discoverability [Poster]

Date: February 2013
Creator: Tmava, Ahmet Meti & Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw
Description: Poster presented at the 2013 International iConference. This poster discusses factors that affect digital resource discoverability and digital curation activities that enhance the visibility of an institutional repository (IR) in an ever-changing digital landscape.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Evolving Scholarly Record

The Evolving Scholarly Record

Date: June 2014
Creator: Lavoie, Brian; Childress, Eric; Erway, Ricky; Faniel, Ixchel; Malpas, Constance; Schaffner, Jennifer et al.
Description: The scholarly record is evolving into a corpus of material vastly different from its previous print-based version. While in the past the scholarly record was largely defined by the formally published monographic and journal literatures, its boundaries are now both expanding and blurring, driven by changes in research practices, as well as changing perceptions of the long-term value of certain forms of scholarly materials. Understanding the nature, scope, and evolutionary trends of the scholarly record is an important concern in many quarters—for libraries, for publishers, for funders, and of course for scholars themselves. This report presents a framework to help organize and drive discussions about the evolving scholarly record. The framework provides a high-level view of the categories of material the scholarly record potentially encompasses, as well as the key stakeholder roles associated with the creation, management, and use of the scholarly record.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
National Digital Newspaper Program: Impact Study 2004 – 2014

National Digital Newspaper Program: Impact Study 2004 – 2014

Date: September 2014
Creator: Mears, Jamie
Description: During the summer of 2014, the Division of Preservation and Access sought to evaluate the impact of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) since its beginnings in 2004. Information about the program was obtained through interviews of project directors, performance reports from the awardees, and a survey of NDNP participants developed by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Library of Congress. Reports from the state partners on their projects were analyzed and examined the ways in which Chronicling America resources are being used. This document summarizes the results of the investigations and demonstrates the impact of NDNP through a constellation of examples. Among other things, the impact study identifies several projects that are taking advantage of this massive, centralized resource as scholars experiment with data mining tools for humanities research. The report concludes in summarizing many project directors' view in saying that the benefits of the National Digital Newspaper Program far surpassed anything anyone could have imagined when the program was launched a decade ago. In sum, NDNP stands as a fine example of what a federal agencies working collaboratively with state partners can achieve.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Fast Lane to Python: A Quick, Sensible Route to the Joys of Python Coding

Fast Lane to Python: A Quick, Sensible Route to the Joys of Python Coding

Date: 2014?
Creator: Matloff, Norm
Description: This book aims to enable the reader to quickly acquire a Python foundation. The material particularly feel quite comfortable to anyone with background in an object-oriented programming (OOP) language such as C++ or Java. Even if ones lack this background, they will still be able to read these sections, but will probably need to go through them more slowly than those who do know OOP. Some Linux knowledge would also be helpful, but it certainly is not required. Python is used on Windows and Macintosh platforms too, not just Linux. So, most statements here made for the Linux context will also apply to Macs as well. The author acknowledged that programming is a personal, creative activity, so everyone has his/her own view.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Common Ground: Exploring Compatibilities Between the Linked Data Models of the Library of Congress and OCLC

Common Ground: Exploring Compatibilities Between the Linked Data Models of the Library of Congress and OCLC

Date: January 2015
Creator: Godby, Carol Jean & Denenberg, Ray
Description: Since 2011, OCLC researchers have been experimenting with Schema.org as a vehicle for exposing library metadata to Web search engines in a format they seek and understand. Schema.org is sponsored by Bing, Google, Yahoo! and Yandex as a common vocabulary for creating structured data markup on Web pages. OCLC’s experiments led to the 2012 publication of Schema.org metadata elements expressed as linked data on 300 million catalog records accessible from WorldCat.org.1 In 2011, BIBFRAME was launched by the Library of Congress (LC) as an initiative to develop a linked data alternative to MARC, building on the Library’s experience providing linked data access to its authority files. In the past year and a half, OCLC has focused on the tasks related to the use of Schema.org: refining the technical infrastructure and data architecture for at-scale publication of linked data for library resources in the broader Web, and investigating the promise of Schema.org as a common ground between the language of the information-seeking public and professional stewards of bibliographic description. BIBFRAME has focused on publishing additional vocabulary and facilitating implementation and testing. These new developments prompt the need to re-examine the relationship between the LC and OCLC models for library linked data. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries