ReSource, Volume 11, Number 1, Fall 1994

ReSource, Volume 11, Number 1, Fall 1994

Date: 1994
Creator: University of North Texas
Description: ReSource magazine includes articles and notes about research at University of North Texas in various academic fields.
Contributing Partner: University Relations, Communications & Marketing department for UNT
[Review] Changing Minds: The Shifting Perception of Culture in Eighteenth-Century France

[Review] Changing Minds: The Shifting Perception of Culture in Eighteenth-Century France

Date: February 2005
Creator: Kaplan, Marijn S.
Description: This book review discusses 'Changing Minds: The Shifting Perception of Culture in Eighteenth-Century France,' by John C. O'Neal, published in 2002.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
[Review] The Enlightenment of Age: Women, Letters, and Growing Old in Eighteenth-Century France

[Review] The Enlightenment of Age: Women, Letters, and Growing Old in Eighteenth-Century France

Date: October 2011
Creator: Kaplan, Marijn S.
Description: This book review discusses 'The Enlightenment of Age: Women, Letters, and Growing Old in Eighteenth-Century France,' by Joan Hinde Stewart and published in 2010.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Transnational Compositionality and Hemon, Shteyngart, Díaz; A No Man's Land, Etc.

Transnational Compositionality and Hemon, Shteyngart, Díaz; A No Man's Land, Etc.

Date: August 2009
Creator: Miner, Joshua D.
Description: Contemporary transnational literature presents a unique interpretive problem, due to new methods of language and culture negotiation in the information age. The resulting condition, transnational compositionality, is evidenced by specific linguistic artifacts; to illustrate this I use three American novels as a case study: Nowhere Man by Aleksandar Hemon, Absurdistan by Gary Shteyngart, and The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz. By extension, many conventional literary elements are changed in the transnational since modernity: satire is no longer a lampooning of cultures but a questioning of the methods by which humans blend cultures together; similarly, complex symbolic constructions may no longer be taken at face value, for they now communicate more about cultural identity processes than static ideologies. If scholars are to achieve adequate interpretations of these elements, we must consider the global framework that has so intimately shaped them in the twenty-first century.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
"According to Their Wills and Pleasures": The Sexual Stereotyping of Mormon Men in American Film and Television

"According to Their Wills and Pleasures": The Sexual Stereotyping of Mormon Men in American Film and Television

Date: May 2009
Creator: Sutton, Travis
Description: This thesis examines the representation of Mormon men in American film and television, with particular regard for sexual identity and the cultural association of Mormonism with sexuality. The history of Mormonism's unique marital practices and doctrinal approaches to gender and sexuality have developed three common stereotypes for Mormon male characters: the purposeful heterosexual, the monstrous polygamist, and the self-destructive homosexual. Depending upon the sexual stereotype in the narrative, the Mormon Church can function as a proponent for nineteenth-century views of sexuality, a symbol for society's repressed sexuality, or a metaphor for the oppressive effects of performing gender and sexuality according to ideological constraints. These ideas are presented in Mormon films such as Saturday's Warrior (1989) as well as mainstream films such as A Mormon Maid (1917) and Advise and Consent (1962).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
JAC Audio Interview: J. Hillis Miller

JAC Audio Interview: J. Hillis Miller

Date: 1994
Creator: Olson, Gary A. & Miller, J. Hillis (Joseph Hillis), 1928-
Description: JAC interview of J. Hillis Miller discussing critical theory and cultural studies in relation to writing, philosophy, and rhetoric.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Across Borders and Barlines: Chicana/o Literature, Jazz Improvisation, and Contrapuntal Solidarity

Across Borders and Barlines: Chicana/o Literature, Jazz Improvisation, and Contrapuntal Solidarity

Date: May 2014
Creator: Leal, Jonathan J.
Description: In this study, I examine Chicana/o writings and Black and Brown musical traditions as they entwine in urban centers and inform local visions of inclusion and models of social change. By analyzing literature and music from South Texas, Southern California, and Northeastern Michigan, I detail how the social particularities of each zone inform Chicana/o cultural productions rooted in the promise of empowerment and the possibility of cross-cultural solidarity. I assert that highlighting localized variations on these themes amplifies contrapuntal solidarities specific to each region, the relationship between different, locally conceived conceptions of Chicana/o identity, and the interplay between Brown and Black aesthetic practices in urban centers near national borders. Through literary critical and ethnomusicological frameworks, I engage the rhetorical patterns that link poetry, jazz improvisation, essays, musical playlists, and corridos to illumine a web of discourses helping to establish the idiosyncratic yet complimentary cultural mores that shape localized social imaginaries in the United States.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries