Relationships between Level of Aspiration and Psychological Needs at the College Level

Relationships between Level of Aspiration and Psychological Needs at the College Level

Date: January 1966
Creator: Skelton, Sanford Kent
Description: The concept of level of aspiration bears directly on goal setting behavior; it is a convenient and important variable in understanding human motivation in a variety of situations. Thus it was the purpose of this study to investigate the relationships between levels of aspiration and the psychological needs of achievement, dominance, autonomy, change, and aggression.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Resistance to impact criteria can lead to a tightening of the accountability noose

Resistance to impact criteria can lead to a tightening of the accountability noose

Date: March 15, 2012
Creator: Holbrook, J. Britt & Frodeman, Robert
Description: Article discussing research on how the resistance to impact criteria can lead to a tightening of the accountability noose.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Accountable Science: The COMPETES Act Needs to Demonstrate an Accountability Attitude

Accountable Science: The COMPETES Act Needs to Demonstrate an Accountability Attitude

Date: September 16, 2010
Creator: Holbrook, J. Britt
Description: Article on the U.S. National Science Foundation's (NSF) Broader Impacts Merit Review Criterion in relation to the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
Self-Structure: Relationship with the Prediction of Behavior and Life History from Thematic Projections

Self-Structure: Relationship with the Prediction of Behavior and Life History from Thematic Projections

Date: December 1980
Creator: Rudolph, Diana Cox
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Parenting Style, Frequency of Electronic Communication with Parents, and the Development of Independence in First Year, First Semester College Students

Parenting Style, Frequency of Electronic Communication with Parents, and the Development of Independence in First Year, First Semester College Students

Date: August 2015
Creator: Etheridge, Lauri McAfee
Description: During the transition to college, emerging adults are expected to develop independence and increase individual responsibility as they live away from home for the first time. Modern electronic communication has enabled emerging adults to maintain frequent, daily contact with the parent, a pattern of communication Hofer refers to as an “electronic tether.” This study examined the link between parenting style and the development of independence of first year, first semester college students. Although these students were in frequent contact with their designated parent, no correlation between frequency of communication and parenting style or independence was found. Both authoritative and helicopter parenting significantly positively predicted attitudinal independence. However, permissive parenting functioned as a significant negative predictor. Authoritarian, permissive, and helicopter parenting significantly positively predicted conflictual independence. However, authoritative parenting functioned as a significant negative predictor. Both authoritative and helicopter parenting significantly positively predicted emotional and functional independence.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Personality Strengths and Perceived Levels of Autonomy and Intimacy in the Family of Origin of Adult Children from Alcoholic Families

Personality Strengths and Perceived Levels of Autonomy and Intimacy in the Family of Origin of Adult Children from Alcoholic Families

Date: December 1987
Creator: Bachner-Schnorr, Harriet
Description: The problem of this study was to assess the impact of growing up in an alcoholic family on adult personality strengths and to determine the perceived levels of autonomy and intimacy in the family of origin. The sample consisted of 115 volunteers, 84 women and 31 men, ages 22 years and older, who had at least one alcoholic parent. The 16 Personality Factor Questionnaires (16 PF) and the Family of Origin Scale (FOS) were administered. A 1 X 3 Chi Square Goodness of Fit analysis was used on each of the 16 personality factors to determine the personality strengths of adult children of alcoholics (ACA). A simple discriminate function analysis was used to determine the degree to which assessed strengths on the 16 PF discriminated self-reported levels of autonomy and intimacy in the family of origin. A multiple regression analysis was used to determine which 16 PF were more closely related to perceived autonomy and intimacy in the family of origin as measured by the FOS.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries