The effects of priming and contingent attention on novel play episodes in a child with autism

The effects of priming and contingent attention on novel play episodes in a child with autism

Date: August 2002
Creator: Josendale, Julianne R.
Description: This study evaluated the effects of priming and contingent attention procedures on play variability in a child with autism. During baseline, numbers of novel play episodes, different play episodes, and actions occurred at low rates. Priming procedures did not produce desired change. When contingent attention was implemented, significant increases occurred in novel play episodes, different actions, and different play episodes. These results show that attention contingent on variable play episodes can increase the number of novel responses to play materials. The results are discussed within the context of treatment and future research.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Countercontrol as a Factor in Teaching Vocal Imitation to an Autistic Child and it Relationship to Motivational Parameters

Countercontrol as a Factor in Teaching Vocal Imitation to an Autistic Child and it Relationship to Motivational Parameters

Date: August 1971
Creator: Hughes, Lois V.
Description: Operant conditioning techniques were used to establish imitation in the manner outlined by Baer. Countercontrol was assessed in motor and vocal imitation across four motivational levels. Three levels of food deprivation, i.e., three hour, fourteen hour, and twenty-one hour, plus a final response contingent shock level, composed the parameters.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
An Analysis of a Procedure Employing the Mowrer Imitation Paradigm in Relationship to the Generalized Imitation Procedure for Establishing Vocal Imitation

An Analysis of a Procedure Employing the Mowrer Imitation Paradigm in Relationship to the Generalized Imitation Procedure for Establishing Vocal Imitation

Date: December 1971
Creator: Perlman, Wesler H.
Description: The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of an ancillary procedure, the Mowrer imitation paradigm, in conjunction with an ongoing generalized imitation program. It was hypothesized that the ancillary program would accelerate the acquisition of vocal imitation relative to a situation In which the generalized imitation procedure was employed alone.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Does Family Quality of Life Change? Evaluation of a Group Parent-coaching Package

Does Family Quality of Life Change? Evaluation of a Group Parent-coaching Package

Date: December 2012
Creator: Wiles, Amber Marie
Description: Improving family quality of life is an important goal when working with families of children with autism. Researchers have attempted to measure changes by developing indices of quality such as affect, stress, and confidence. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a group parent-coaching program on measures aimed at addressing quality: a) parent confidence, stress and affect ratings; b) child affect ratings; c) the frequency of coordinated joint attention (CJA); and d) parent report of satisfaction and efficacy. Over the course of four weeks, the coaching program involved group presentations, discussions, video sharing, and problem solving, and individual in-vivo coaching sessions regarding specific child skill development. Results from the five parent-child dyads suggested increases in areas associated with quality of life. Results are discussed in the context of quality themes and mixed methods research.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of a Group Parent-coaching Package on the Behavior of Children with Autism and Their Parents

The Effects of a Group Parent-coaching Package on the Behavior of Children with Autism and Their Parents

Date: December 2012
Creator: Vaughn, Brittany M. L.
Description: Support for parents is an important part of treatment programs for children diagnosed with autism. Parent training programs have generally focused on prescribed goals in one-on-one training settings with measures directly related to the goals. Of interest here are the few studies that included collaborative goals, expanded measures, and group training. Benefits of such approaches include the establishment of natural communities of reinforcement and better understanding of the breadth of effects. The purpose of this study was to determine if a group coaching approach would be effective in changing a large range of parent and child skills. This experiment involved group sessions (presentations, discussion, video sharing, and problem solving) and three individual in-vivo coaching sessions. The intervention took place over the course of four weeks. Direct measures included a parent skills checklist and child target behaviors. Results indicated an overall improvement on most measures that maintained or improved at follow-up.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Formation of a Receptive Vocabulary and its Effect on the Rate of Acquisition of its Expressive Counterpart in an Autistic Child

Formation of a Receptive Vocabulary and its Effect on the Rate of Acquisition of its Expressive Counterpart in an Autistic Child

Date: December 1972
Creator: O'Banion, Dan R.
Description: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between receptive oral expressive vocabularies. It was hypothesized that receptive discrimination pretraining has a greater influence on the reate of acquisition of its expressive vocal counterpart as compared to the reate of vocal acquisition of words without receptive pretraining.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Measurement System for Monitoring Play in Typically Developing Children and Children with Autism

A Measurement System for Monitoring Play in Typically Developing Children and Children with Autism

Date: May 2002
Creator: Gudmundsdottir, Kristin
Description: A comprehensive measurement system was developed to monitor play in children with autism and typically developing children. The study was conducted in a preschool operated in conjunction with a center-based program for children with autism. The development of the measurement system was based on observations of four children with autism and three typically developing children during social and play activites. Data were collected on material use and several dimensions of play: Simple Manipulation, Functional Manipulation, Symbolic Toy Play, Symbolic Role Play and Play Themes. The results indicated that the measurement system consistently measured a wide range of play behaviors across children and materials. Significance of the information gathered from the measurement system in assessing play and designing interventions is discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Application of a Non-Speech Response Mode in Teaching Simple Language Functions to Three Autistic Children

Application of a Non-Speech Response Mode in Teaching Simple Language Functions to Three Autistic Children

Date: August 1972
Creator: Barnes, Patrick R.
Description: A non-speech response mode similar to the one used by Prepack (1971) to teach language to a chimpanzee was utilized to teach two simple language functions to three autistic children. The response mode consisted of picking up a geometric symbol and placing it on a response tray. The geometric symbol was the basic unit in this language system. The symbols were used to represent objects in the environment and relationships between the objects.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The Effects of the Density of Reinforcement on the Maladaptive Behaviors of a Child With Autism

The Effects of the Density of Reinforcement on the Maladaptive Behaviors of a Child With Autism

Date: December 2000
Creator: Motiejunas, Kristina M.
Description: The present study consists of two experiments that analyze the effects of high and low densities of reinforcemnt on the maladaptive behaviors of a 9 year old girl with autism. The first experiment investigates the isolated effects of density of reinforcement on the frequency of maladaptive behaviors during a motor imitation teaching task. High densities of reinforcement produced fewer occurrences of maladaptive behavior than low densities of reinforcement. Experiment 2 analyzes the effects of density of reinforcement during the same teaching tasks as in experiment 1 on maladaptive behavior, task accuracy, prompt resistance, and language. Maladaptive behavior did not recur during experiment 2. High density of reinforcement conditions during the second experiment showed a positive effect on the accuracy of responding and compliance with prompts.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
See Sam Run: a Mother's Story of Autism

See Sam Run: a Mother's Story of Autism

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 15, 2008
Creator: Heinkel-Wolfe, Peggy
Description: Thousands of children are diagnosed with autism each year, with a rate of occurrence of 1 in 150 births, compared to 5 per 10,000 just two decades ago. This astounding escalation has professionals scrambling to explain why the devastating neurological disorder, which profoundly affects a person’s language and social development, is on the rise. Are we simply getting better at diagnosing autism, or is a modern health crisis unfolding before us?
Contributing Partner: UNT Press
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