Comparison of client attendance, attrition, and outcomes in 2 class system packages.

Comparison of client attendance, attrition, and outcomes in 2 class system packages.

Date: August 2008
Creator: Berends, Valori
Description: Using the principles of systems analysis as a guide, this study compared two class schedule formats used by Behavior Management and Parenting Services (BMAPS) in order to address the following research questions: 1) What effects do 2 different class formats have on student attrition and appointment keeping? 2) What effects do 2 different class formats have on student outcomes on a pre and posttest assessment? 3) What effects do 2 different class formats have on staff procedures? BMAPS provides parent education to individuals referred by Child Protective Services. The current research included approximately 200 referred clients with an appointment or class scheduled with BMAPS between January 1, 2006 and September 22, 2007. Data was collected by reviewing client files for class attendance and performance records. Results of this study allow BMAPS to enlist the class format that is correlated with better attrition rates and client outcomes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
The predictive influence of variables in three different academic learning environments on the intentions of music education majors to leave the degree program.

The predictive influence of variables in three different academic learning environments on the intentions of music education majors to leave the degree program.

Date: May 2003
Creator: Corley, Alton L.
Description: Attrition rates among students in music teacher training programs have contributed to a shortage of qualified music teachers for the nation's schools. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictive relationship of academic variables in three different learning environments and the intent of a select population of music education majors to leave the degree program. The study drew upon the work of Tinto, Bean and Astin to form a theoretical foundation for examining variables unique to student withdrawal from the music education degree plan. Variables were examined within the context of three different learning environments: (1) applied lessons, (2) ensembles and (3) non-performance courses. Participants were 95 freshmen and sophomore music education majors at a public university who were enrolled in the music education degree program during the spring semester, 2002. Data included participant responses on the Music Student Inventory (MSI), a questionnaire developed specifically for the study, and grade data from university records. Independent variables in the study included participants' perceptions of (1) Ensemble experiences, (2) Applied lesson experiences, (3) Non-performance music course experiences, (3) Course requirements, and (4) Performance growth. Additional variables included: (1) Ensemble placement, (2) Course grades for music theory, applied lessons and aural ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Early Predictors of Early Freshman Year Attrition in Female Hispanic Students

Early Predictors of Early Freshman Year Attrition in Female Hispanic Students

Date: August 2011
Creator: Speed, Heather Faye
Description: The Texas Hispanic population is projected to grow to 18.8 million, almost tripling its number within the state, in only 30 years. This rapid growth is a concern for Texas higher education because this group has traditionally been under-represented in colleges and universities. Also, according to national, state, and local data, Hispanic students are retained at a lower rate than are other ethnic groups. Because of lower retention rates for Hispanic students and because the majority of Hispanic college students are female, an increasing number of Hispanic women are heads of households. Studying the attrition rates of Hispanic females could provide a better understanding of how the state can improve both the participation and retention rates of this population. This study utilized descriptive statistics and regression analysis to identify the correlations between and among the dependent variable of attrition and independent variables derived from (1) pre-college survey responses measuring college expectations and (2) early-first semester survey responses measuring actual college experience. Institutional data were used to confirm enrollment status at the beginning of the second semester. The sample of the study was all female, full-time, first-time-in college student survey respondents attending a public 4-year institution in Texas. This number included ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Attrition in Longitudinal Studies Using Older Adults: A Meta-Analysis

Attrition in Longitudinal Studies Using Older Adults: A Meta-Analysis

Date: December 2005
Creator: Rhodes, Anthony Ryan
Description: Longitudinal methods have become an improved and essential means of measuring intra-individual change over time. Yet one of the greatest and most hazardous drawbacks studying participants over multiple sessions can be the loss of participants over time. This study attempts to illuminate the problem of attrition in longitudinal research by estimating the mean effect sizes for participant loss across 57 studies published in 13 prestigious journals which regularly use older participants. Results estimate overall attrition to be around 34% of the original sample. The subsequent break down of attrition into its subtypes yield mean effect sizes for attrition due to Refusal (8%), Loss of contact (10%), Illness (6%), and Death (14%) in studies sampling from adults 50 years or older. Analyses were then conducted via meta-analytic one-way ANOVA and weighted regression to identify possible moderators of overall attrition and their four subtypes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Elementary Teacher Attrition and Factors of Organizational Climate

Elementary Teacher Attrition and Factors of Organizational Climate

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2003
Creator: Cotten, Virginia E.
Description: As the United States faces a critical teacher shortage, it is important to examine all factors that may contribute to the revolving door of teacher attrition. This study explored the climate of elementary schools to determine if there was a correlation between teacher attrition and school organizational climate. Three basic research questions were addressed: 1) Is there a relationship between school organizational climate and teacher attrition? 2) Is a change in campus leadership related to school organizational climate? 3) Is there a relationship between a change in campus leadership and teacher attrition? Thirty-seven elementary schools were examined in terms of their individual teacher attrition rates and their climate survey scores. The data utilized in this study came from one school district's climate survey and teacher attrition rates for the 2000-2001 school year. The findings of this study indicate that factors of organizational climate may predict teacher attrition rates. Specifically, instructiona support may be related to teacher attrition. Major components of instructional support include principal behaviors, respect for teaching and learning, and communication with administrators. Teacher attrition was not related to principal experience. Also, principal experience was not related to factors of school organizational climate.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Factors Related to Teacher Retention: the Lived Experiences of Four Teachers in an Urban, Hard-to-staff High School

Factors Related to Teacher Retention: the Lived Experiences of Four Teachers in an Urban, Hard-to-staff High School

Date: August 2013
Creator: Julian, Chris
Description: Retaining quality teachers is critical to the success of America's schools. How to retain quality teachers, especially in high needs schools, is a question of fervent debate among educational researchers, policy makers, administrators, parents, and students. This study examines the issue of teacher retention from an emic perspective, focused on understanding the perspective of those closest to the retention decision, teachers in hard-to-staff schools. This study examines the lived experiences of four teachers at a hard-to-staff, urban, secondary school as these experiences impact their decisions to remain in teaching and at their current campus. Research methods adopted an existential phenomenological perspective and focused on understanding deeply the perspective of participants and how participants make meaning of their lived experiences as they relate to the retention decision. Three hour-long interviews were conducted with each of the four participants utilizing methodology laid out by Seidman (1991). Data were analyzed using NVIVO 10 to apply a series of coding and recoding procedures to interview transcripts. Conclusions suggest four factors motivated these teachers to teach and remain in their current hard-to-staff, urban, secondary school. These factors include: belief in the power of education, relationships with students, mentoring and professional partnering, and remaining professionally challenged. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries