Evaluation of a Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) Exclusion and Trapping Device for Use in Aquatic Plant Founder Colony Establishment

Evaluation of a Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) Exclusion and Trapping Device for Use in Aquatic Plant Founder Colony Establishment

Date: May 2008
Creator: Williams, Paul Edwin
Description: The focus of this study was to design and evaluate a trapping system that would reduce populations of common carp within water bodies in conjunction with establishment of native aquatic macrophytes founder colonies. A pond study and field study were conducted. A pond study was performed at the Lewisville Aquatic Ecosystem Research Facility, located in Lewisville, Texas, followed by a field study within a constructed wetland located in southern Dallas, Texas. For the pond study, twelve funnel traps were constructed (four reps of each type: control, dual-walled and ring cage). Two anti-escape devices were tested with funnels including steel fingers and hinged flaps. Ring cage and dual-walled treatments were planted using native pondweeds, while controls were left unplanted (additional bait and a drift fence scenarios were also tested). Common carp were introduced into the study pond. Chi-square statistical analyses were utilized and showed ring cage treatments using fingers as well as the use of a drift fence to be most effective. Following completion of the pond study, the two most effective treatments (controls and ring cages) were tested within the Dallas, Texas wetland; no carp were caught during the field test.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Comparative Phyto-uptake Across Distribution Coefficients of Pharmaceutical Compounds and Aquatic Macrophytes: Carbamazepine and Amiodarone Uptake in Lemna Spp

Comparative Phyto-uptake Across Distribution Coefficients of Pharmaceutical Compounds and Aquatic Macrophytes: Carbamazepine and Amiodarone Uptake in Lemna Spp

Date: August 2013
Creator: Woodard, Jennifer Kristin
Description: Few studies have been conducted on the effectiveness of phytoremediation of pharmaceutical compounds, although the persistent and non-acutely toxic nature of many of these compounds in today's water bodies may yield an ideal application for this practice. To quantify the potential effectiveness of plant uptake, kinetic and proportional bioconcentration factors (BCFk, and BCFp, respectively) in nanograms (ng) carbamazepine and amiodarone per gram (g) wet weight plant tissue for Lemna spp. were determined utilizing a 14-day continuous flow-through study. Samples were analyzed using isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC-MS/MS) running in positive ion mode. Kinetic BCF was estimated at 0.538, while proportional BCF was estimated at 0.485. Kinetic BCF for the amiodarone study was estimated at 23.033, whereas proportional BCF was estimated at 41.340. Possible contamination of the C18 column and peristaltic pump failure may have impacted uptake results. In light of variability and current lack of research in the field, this work should be considered exploratory rather than conclusive.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Large-Scale Operations Management Test of Use of the White Amur for Control of Problem Aquatic Plants, Report 2: First Year Poststocking Results, Volume 2: The Fish, Mammals, and Waterfowl of Lake Conway, Florida

Large-Scale Operations Management Test of Use of the White Amur for Control of Problem Aquatic Plants, Report 2: First Year Poststocking Results, Volume 2: The Fish, Mammals, and Waterfowl of Lake Conway, Florida

Date: 1982
Creator: Hardin, Scott; Land, Roy; Morse, Gary & Spelman, Mike
Description: Abstract: "Fish, waterfowl and wading birds, and aquatic mammal populations on Lake Conway were surveyed for 1 year after the introduction of the herbivorous fish, white amur (Ctenopharyngodon idella). Low water levels reduced littoral zone area, which lead to stunted panfish and poorer condition of largemouth bass. Vegetated samples supported more diverse fish populations than beach sites. White amur and migratory waterfowl consumed the same plant foods; continued reduction of submerged plants by white amur may adversely affect overwintering waterfowl populations. Aquatic mammals were influenced by removal of vegetation due to shoreline development."
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department