The Light Airplane

The Light Airplane

Date: April 1, 1925
Creator: Driggs, Ivan H.
Description: This report begins with a review and analysis of the work being done to develop light airplanes in the U.S. and abroad. A technical discussion of the construction and innovations in light airplanes is then presented.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Characteristics of the N.A.C.A 97, Clark Y, and N.A.C.A. M6 Airfoils with Particular Reference to the Angle of Attack

The Characteristics of the N.A.C.A 97, Clark Y, and N.A.C.A. M6 Airfoils with Particular Reference to the Angle of Attack

Date: December 1, 1927
Creator: Higgins, George J.
Description: No abstract available.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
NACA Conference on Aircraft Structures

NACA Conference on Aircraft Structures

Date: March 7, 1951
Creator: unknown
Description: This document contains reproductions of technical papers on some of the most recent research results on aircraft structures from the NACA Laboratories. These papers were presented by members of the staff of the NACA Laboratories at the NACA conference held at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory March 7, 1951. The purpose of this conference was to convey to those involved in the study of aircraft structures these recent research results and to provide those attending an opportunity for discussion of these results. The papers in this document are in the same form in which they were presented at the conference so that distribution of them might be prompt. The original presentation and this record are considered as complimentary to, rather than as substitute for, the Committee?s system of complete and formal reports.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Identification of Aircraft Tubing by Rockwell Test

Identification of Aircraft Tubing by Rockwell Test

Date: June 1, 1930
Creator: Knerr, Horace C.
Description: Seamless steel tubing is today the principal material of construction for aircraft. The commercial grade of tubing containing about 0.10 to 0.20% carbon at first used is being superseded by two grades which are approved by the army and navy, and which are also becoming standard for commercial airplanes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Performance of Several Propellers on YP-47M Airplane at High Blade Loading, 2, Curtiss 838-1C2-18R1 Four-Blade Propeller

Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Performance of Several Propellers on YP-47M Airplane at High Blade Loading, 2, Curtiss 838-1C2-18R1 Four-Blade Propeller

Date: November 26, 1946
Creator: Wallner, Lewis E. & Sorin, Solomon M.
Description: An investigation was conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel to determine the performance of a Curtiss propeller with four 838-lC2-lSRl blades on a YP-47M airplane at high blade loadings and engine powers. The study was made for a range of power coefficients between 0.30 and 1.00 at free-stream Mach numbers of 0.40 and 0.50. The results of the force measurements indicate primarily the trend of propeller efficiency for changes in power coefficient or advance-diameter ratio, inasmuch as corrections for the effects of tunnel-wall constriction on the installation have not been applied. Slip-stream pressure surveys across the propeller disk are presented to illustrate blade thrust load distribution for several operating conditions. At a free-stream Mach number of 0.40, nearly constant peak efficiencies were obtained at power coefficients from 0.30 to 0.70. A change in power coefficient from 0.70 to 0.90 reduced the peak efficiency about 5 percent. Blade stall at the tip sections became evident for a power coefficient of 0.91 when the advance-diameter ratio was reduced to 1.87. At a free-stream Mach number of 0.50, the highest propeller efficiencies were obtained for power coefficients from 0.80 to 1.00 at advance-diameter ratios above 2.90. At advance-diameter ratios below 2.90, the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A Theoretical Investigation of the Rolling Oscillations of an Airplane with Ailerons Free

A Theoretical Investigation of the Rolling Oscillations of an Airplane with Ailerons Free

Date: January 1, 1944
Creator: Cohen, Doris
Description: An analysis is made of the stability of an airplane with ailerons free, with particular attention to the motions when the ailerons have a tendency to float against the wind. The present analysis supersedes the aileron investigation contained in NACA Report No. 709. The equations of motion are first written to include yawing and sideslipping, and it is demonstrated that the principal effects of freeing the ailerons can be determined without regard to these motions. If the ailerons tend to float against the wind and have a high degree of aerodynamic balance, rolling oscillations, in addition to the normal lateral oscillations, are likely to occur. On the basis of the equations including only the rolling motion and the aileron deflection, formulas are derived for the stability and damping of the rolling oscillations in terms of the hinge moment derivatives and other characteristics of the ailerons and airplane. Charts are also presented showing the oscillatory regions and stability boundaries for a fictitious airplane of conventional proportions. The effects of friction in the control system are investigated and discussed. If the ailerons tend to trail with the wind, the condition for stable variation of stick force with aileron deflection is found to ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Design Data for Graphical Construction of Two-Dimensional Sharp-Edge-Throat Supersonic Nozzles

Design Data for Graphical Construction of Two-Dimensional Sharp-Edge-Throat Supersonic Nozzles

Date: December 2, 1948
Creator: Shames, Harold & Seashore, Ferris L.
Description: Design data are presented for the graphical construction of two-dimensional sharp-edge-throat supersonic nozzles of minimum length for test-section Mach numbers from 1.20 to 10.00. The method of characteristics used in the design is briefly reviewed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Experimental Pressure Distribution on Fuselage Nose and Pilot Canopy of Supersonic Airplane at Mach Number 1.90

Experimental Pressure Distribution on Fuselage Nose and Pilot Canopy of Supersonic Airplane at Mach Number 1.90

Date: October 15, 1948
Creator: Wyatt, DeMarquis D.
Description: An investigation of the pressure distribution on the fuselage nose and the pilot canopy of a supersonic airplane model has been conducted at a Mach number of 1.90 over a wide range of angles of attack and yaw. Boundary layer separation apparently occurred from the upper surface at angles of attack above 24 degrees and from the lower surface at minus 15 degrees. No separation from the sides of the fuselage was evident at yaw angles up to 12 degrees.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Safeguards Against Flutter of Airplanes

Safeguards Against Flutter of Airplanes

Date: August 1, 1956
Creator: deVries, Gerhard
Description: This report is a complilation of practical rules, derived at the same time from theory and from experience, intended to guide the aeronautical engineer in the design of flutter-free airplanes. Rules applicable to the wing, the ailerons, flaps, tabs,tail surfaces, and fuselage are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Portion of the Horizontal Tail from a Douglas C-74 Airplane with Fabric-Covered Elevators

Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Portion of the Horizontal Tail from a Douglas C-74 Airplane with Fabric-Covered Elevators

Date: May 6, 1947
Creator: Perone, Angelo & Berthold, Cecil L.
Description: A Douglas C-74 airplane, during a test dive at about 0.525 Mach number, experienced uncontrollable longitudinal oscillations sufficient to cause shedding of the outer wing panels and the subsequent crash of the airplane. Tests of a section of the horizontal tail plane from a C-74 airplane were conducted in the Ames 16-foot high-speed wind tunnel to investigate the possibility of the tail as a contributing factor to the accident. The results of the investigations of fabric-covered elevators in various conditions of surface deformation are presented in this report.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
FIRST PREV 1 2 3 4 5 NEXT LAST