U.S. Strategic Nuclear Forces: Background, Developments, and Issues

U.S. Strategic Nuclear Forces: Background, Developments, and Issues

Date: February 22, 2012
Creator: Woolf, Amy F.
Description: During discussions about the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review, Congress reviewed and discussed the plans for maintaining and modernizing U.S. strategic nuclear forces. Although the United States plans to reduce the number of warheads deployed on its long-range missiles and bombers, consistent with the terms of the New START Treaty, it also plans to develop new delivery systems for deployment over the next 20-30 years. As a result, the 112th Congress will continue to review these programs during the annual authorization and appropriations process.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The New START Treaty: Central Limits and Key Provisions

The New START Treaty: Central Limits and Key Provisions

Date: December 23, 2011
Creator: Woolf, Amy F.
Description: The United States and Russia signed a new strategic arms reduction treaty - known as New START - on April 8, 2010. This treaty is designed to replace the 1991 Strategic Arms Reductions Treaty (START), which expired, after 15 years of implementation, on December 5, 2009. This report provides an overview of New START, including a comparison to the original START Treaty, the belief of the Obama Administration and outside analysts that New START will enhance U.S. national security, and the criticisms of those who say that New START (and, indeed, the entire issue of U.S.-Russian arms control) is a distraction from more important items on the nonproliferation agenda.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The New START Treaty: Central Limits and Key Provisions

The New START Treaty: Central Limits and Key Provisions

Date: April 21, 2011
Creator: Woolf, Amy F.
Description: The United States and Russia signed a new strategic arms reduction treaty - known as New START - on April 8, 2010. This treaty is designed to replace the 1991 Strategic Arms Reductions Treaty (START), which expired, after 15 years of implementation, on December 5, 2009. This report provides an overview of New START, including a comparison to the original START Treaty, the belief of the Obama Administration and outside analysts that New START will enhance U.S. national security, and the criticisms of those who say that New START (and, indeed, the entire issue of U.S.-Russian arms control) is a distraction from more important items on the nonproliferation agenda.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Nuclear Arms Control: The Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty

Nuclear Arms Control: The Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty

Date: January 18, 2008
Creator: Woolf, Amy F.
Description: This report provides background information regarding the Nuclear Arms Control negotiations between U.S. and Russia. In addition it discusses treaties, the content and form of the agreements.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Nonproliferation and Threat Reduction Assistance: U.S. Programs in the Former Soviet Union

Nonproliferation and Threat Reduction Assistance: U.S. Programs in the Former Soviet Union

Date: March 6, 2012
Creator: Woolf, Amy F.
Description: Congress passed the Nunn-Lugar amendment, authorizing U.S. threat reduction assistance to the former Soviet Union, in November 1991, after a failed coup in Moscow and the disintegration of the Soviet Union raised concerns about the safety and security of Soviet nuclear weapons. It has evolved from an emergency response to impending chaos in the Soviet Union, to a more comprehensive threat reduction and nonproliferation effort, to a broader program seeking to keep nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons from leaking out of the former Soviet Union and into the hands of rogue nations or terrorist groups, to a global program to address the threat of weapons of mass destruction. Analysts have debated numerous issues related to U.S. nonproliferation and threat reduction assistance. These include questions about the coordination of and priority given to these programs in the U.S. government, questions about Russia's willingness to provide the United States with access to its weapons facilities, questions about the President's ability to waive certification requirements so that the programs can go forward, and questions about the need to expand the efforts into a global program that receives funding from numerous nations and possibly extends assistance to others outside the former Soviet Union.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
U.S. Strategic Nuclear Forces: Background, Developments, and Issues

U.S. Strategic Nuclear Forces: Background, Developments, and Issues

Date: May 4, 2011
Creator: Woolf, Amy F.
Description: During discussions about the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review, Congress reviewed and discussed the plans for maintaining and modernizing U.S. strategic nuclear forces. Although the United States plans to reduce the number of warheads deployed on its long-range missiles and bombers, consistent with the terms of the New START Treaty, it also plans to develop new delivery systems for deployment over the next 20-30 years. As a result, the 112th Congress will continue to review these programs during the annual authorization and appropriations process.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Conventional Prompt Global Strike and Long-Range Ballistic Missiles: Background and Issues

Conventional Prompt Global Strike and Long-Range Ballistic Missiles: Background and Issues

Date: June 21, 2011
Creator: Woolf, Amy F.
Description: This report looks at why prompt global strike (PGS) missiles are beneficial to the U.S., and how they can help contribute to a conventional prompt global strike (CPGS) mission.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Conventional Prompt Global Strike and Long-Range Ballistic Missiles: Background and Issues

Conventional Prompt Global Strike and Long-Range Ballistic Missiles: Background and Issues

Date: July 6, 2012
Creator: Woolf, Amy F.
Description: Prompt global strike (PGS) would allow the United States to strike targets anywhere on Earth with conventional weapons in as little as an hour. This report looks at some concerns that Congress has shown for the PGS program, including the Department of Defenses' rationale for the mission, the Air Force's ability to set up the system in a timely manner, and how the new START Treaty between the US and Russia will affect the system.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The New START Treaty: Central Limits and Key Provisions

The New START Treaty: Central Limits and Key Provisions

Date: February 14, 2012
Creator: Woolf, Amy F.
Description: The United States and Russia signed a new strategic arms reduction treaty - known as New START - on April 8, 2010. This treaty is designed to replace the 1991 Strategic Arms Reductions Treaty (START), which expired, after 15 years of implementation, on December 5, 2009. This report provides an overview of New START, including a comparison to the original START Treaty, the belief of the Obama Administration and outside analysts that New START will enhance U.S. national security, and the criticisms of those who say that New START (and, indeed, the entire issue of U.S.-Russian arms control) is a distraction from more important items on the nonproliferation agenda.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Monitoring and Verification in Arms Control

Monitoring and Verification in Arms Control

Date: July 2, 2011
Creator: Woolf, Amy F.
Description: This report reviews some of the monitoring and verification provisions in the new START Treaty between the U.S. and Russia and compares these with some of the provisions in the original START Treaty. It focuses, specifically, on differences between the treaties in the provisions governing the exchange of data, known as telemetry, generated during missile flight tests; provisions governing the monitoring of mobile intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs); and differences in the numbers and types of on-site inspections.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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