The Fair Labor Standards Act: Continuing Issues in the Debate

The Fair Labor Standards Act: Continuing Issues in the Debate

Date: May 28, 2008
Creator: Whittaker, William G.
Description: This reports details the history of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). It focuses on the administration of the act and the interpretation of provisions, which Congress has left to the discretion of the Secretary of Labor. It also considers judicial decisions, which make up a substantial part of wage/hour issues and have an impact upon enforcement of the statute.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Fair Labor Standards Act: Changes Made by the 101st Congress and Their Implications

The Fair Labor Standards Act: Changes Made by the 101st Congress and Their Implications

Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Whittaker, William G.
Description: Initially, in the 101st Congress, a measure to increase federal minimum wage (and to make numerous other changes in the FLSA) was passed by both the House and the Senate but, in June 1989, it was vetoed by President Bush. An effort by the House to override the President's veto was unsuccessful. Later, new legislation was introduced and approved both by the House and the Senate. On November 17, 1989, President Bush signed the bill (P.L. 101-107).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Federal Regulation of Working Hours: The Ballenger and Ashcroft Proposals (H.R. 1 and S.4)

Federal Regulation of Working Hours: The Ballenger and Ashcroft Proposals (H.R. 1 and S.4)

Date: April 16, 1998
Creator: Whittaker, William G
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Computer Services Personnel: Overtime Pay Under the Fair Labor Standards Act

Computer Services Personnel: Overtime Pay Under the Fair Labor Standards Act

Date: September 18, 2001
Creator: Whittaker, William G
Description: The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA), as amended, is the primary federal statute in the area of minimum wages and overtime pay. Through administrative rulemaking, the Secretary of Labor has established two tests through which to define eligibility under the Section 13(a)(1) exemption: a duties test and an earnings test. In the 106th Congress, legislation was introduced by Representatives Andrews and Lazio that would have increased the scope of the exemption: first, by expanding the range of exempt job titles, and then, through a relative reduction in the value of the earnings threshold or test. For example, were the minimum wage increased to $6.15 per hour, as pending proposals would do, the value of the computer services exemption threshold would be 4.5 times the federal minimum wage. Ultimately, neither bill was enacted, but the issue has re-emerged as H.R. 1545 (Andrews) and H.R. 546 (Quinn).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Minimum Wage and Related Issues Before the 106th Congress: A Status Report

Minimum Wage and Related Issues Before the 106th Congress: A Status Report

Date: January 24, 2001
Creator: Whittaker, William G
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Minimum Wage: An Overview of Issues Before the 106th Congress

The Minimum Wage: An Overview of Issues Before the 106th Congress

Date: July 19, 2000
Creator: Whittaker, William G
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Computer Services Personnel: Overtime Pay Under the Fair Labor Standards Act

Computer Services Personnel: Overtime Pay Under the Fair Labor Standards Act

Date: January 6, 2003
Creator: Whittaker, William G
Description: The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA), as amended, is the primary federal statute in the area of minimum wages and overtime pay. Through administrative rulemaking, the Secretary of Labor has established two tests through which to define eligibility under the Section 13(a)(1) exemption: a duties test and an earnings test. In the 106th Congress, legislation was introduced by Representatives Andrews and Lazio that would have increased the scope of the exemption: first, by expanding the range of exempt job titles, and then, through a relative reduction in the value of the earnings threshold or test. For example, were the minimum wage increased to $6.15 per hour, as pending proposals would do, the value of the computer services exemption threshold would be 4.5 times the federal minimum wage. Ultimately, neither bill was enacted, but the issue has re-emerged as H.R. 1545 (Andrews) and H.R. 546 (Quinn).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Compensatory Time vs. Cash Wages: Amending the Fair Labor Standards Act?

Compensatory Time vs. Cash Wages: Amending the Fair Labor Standards Act?

Date: April 29, 2003
Creator: Whittaker, William G
Description: In the 108th Congress, two work hours flexibility bills have been introduced: S. 317 by Senator Gregg and H.R. 1119 by Representative Biggert. Both bills deal with a compensatory time off option (comp time) — though the Gregg proposal is somewhat broader, projecting other changes in the overtime provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) as well. This report is limited to consideration of the issue of comp time.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Computer Services Personnel: Overtime Pay Under the Fair Labor Standards Act

Computer Services Personnel: Overtime Pay Under the Fair Labor Standards Act

Date: February 7, 2005
Creator: Whittaker, William G
Description: The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA), as amended, is the primary federal statute in the area of minimum wages and overtime pay. Through administrative rulemaking, the Secretary of Labor has established two tests through which to define eligibility under the Section 13(a)(1) exemption: a duties test and an earnings test. In the 106th Congress, legislation was introduced by Representatives Andrews and Lazio that would have increased the scope of the exemption: first, by expanding the range of exempt job titles, and then, through a relative reduction in the value of the earnings threshold or test. For example, were the minimum wage increased to $6.15 per hour, as pending proposals would do, the value of the computer services exemption threshold would be 4.5 times the federal minimum wage. Ultimately, neither bill was enacted, but the issue has re-emerged as H.R. 1545 (Andrews) and H.R. 546 (Quinn).
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Overtime Pay: The Department of Labor Initiative and Congressional Response (2003-2004)

Overtime Pay: The Department of Labor Initiative and Congressional Response (2003-2004)

Date: September 30, 2004
Creator: Whittaker, William G
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
FIRST PREV 1 2 NEXT LAST