China's Foreign Conventional Arms Acquisitions: Background and Analysis

China's Foreign Conventional Arms Acquisitions: Background and Analysis

Date: October 10, 2000
Creator: Kan, Shirley A; Bolkcom, Christopher & O'Rourke, Ronald
Description: This report examines the major, foreign conventional weapon systems that China has acquired or has committed to acquire since 1990, with particular attention to implications for U.S. security concerns. It is not the assumption of this report that China’s military, the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), will engage in conflict with other forces in Asia. Nonetheless, since the mid-1990s, there has been increasing concern about China’s assertiveness in Asia and greater threats against Taiwan.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
China's Foreign Conventional Arms Acquisitions: Background and Analysis

China's Foreign Conventional Arms Acquisitions: Background and Analysis

Date: November 6, 2001
Creator: Kan, Shirley A; Bolkcom, Christopher & O'Rourke, Ronald
Description: This report examines the major, foreign conventional weapon systems that China has acquired or has committed to acquire since 1990, with particular attention to implications for U.S. security concerns. It is not the assumption of this report that China’s military, the People’s Liberation Army (PLA), will engage in conflict with other forces in Asia. Nonetheless, since the mid-1990s, there has been increasing concern about China’s assertiveness in Asia and greater threats against Taiwan.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Brazilian Trade Policy and the United States

Brazilian Trade Policy and the United States

Date: February 3, 2006
Creator: Hornbeck, J. F.
Description: As the largest and one of the most influential countries in Latin America, Brazil has emerged as a leading voice for developing countries in setting regional and multilateral trade agendas. Brazil is critical of U.S. trade policies such as the Byrd Amendment (repealed, but program in effect until October 1, 2007), which directs duties from trade remedy cases to affected industries, the administration of trade remedy rules, and what it considers to be discriminatory treatment in the U.S. expansion of free trade agreements in Latin America. Despite the differences, both countries recognize the potential for important gains to be had from mutually acceptable trade liberalization at all levels.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department