Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Justin Strickland Hoff

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Justin Strickland Hoff

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Hoff, Justin Strickland
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Justin Strickland Hoff.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Marseille Moon

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Marseille Moon

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Moon, Marseille
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Marseille Moon.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Ann Howington

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Ann Howington

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Howington, Ann
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Ann Howington.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: XuHao Yang

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: XuHao Yang

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Yang, XuHao
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, XuHao Yang.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Madeleine Fitzgerald

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Madeleine Fitzgerald

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Fitzgerald, Madeleine
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Madeleine Fitzgerald.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Allison Jarek

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Allison Jarek

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Jarek, Allison
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Allison Jarek.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Caleb Zouhary

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Caleb Zouhary

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Zouhary, Caleb
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Caleb Zouhary.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Cassie Phan

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Cassie Phan

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Phan, Cassie
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Cassie Phan.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Chance Dunlap

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Chance Dunlap

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Dunlap, Chance
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Chance Dunlap.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Rachel Christensen

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Rachel Christensen

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Christensen, Rachel
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Rachel Christensen.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Sean Miller

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Sean Miller

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Miller, Sean
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Sean Miller.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Michael Blair

Personal Response to Digital Frontiers Roundtable: Michael Blair

Date: September 21, 2012
Creator: Blair, Michael
Description: This response paper is for Dr. Jennifer Way's graduate art history seminar on 20th-21st century art. Students in Way's seminar attended 'Social Media and Digital Communities: A Roundtable Discussion,' a session featured at the Digital Frontiers 2012 conference. Way charged her students with writing a short paper to explore connections between the roundtable and their seminar studies. What follows is a short paper by graduate student, Michael Blair.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Mapping Molly Affect: Subjectivities of Society and Same-Sex Individuals through Eighteenth-Century British Print Culture

Mapping Molly Affect: Subjectivities of Society and Same-Sex Individuals through Eighteenth-Century British Print Culture

Date: Spring 2012
Creator: Camp, Briana
Description: Thesis written by a student in the UNT Honors College discussing eighteenth century homosexual culture in London, England, as related through emotional geography and print media.
Contributing Partner: UNT Honors College
[Interview with Elda Harrington]

[Interview with Elda Harrington]

Date: April 2, 2008
Creator: Kidd, Allison & Westrup, Sarah
Description: This transcript is the record of an interview with photographer Elda Harrington about how technology affects her work as part of a lecture series, "Women Art Technology." During the interview, Harrington discusses her own work in photography as well as the schools and the photography festival that she has established in Argentina. The transcript includes a brief introduction with a biography of Harrington and general information about the lecture series and the specific interview. A list of 'Suggested reading' materials is also listed at the end of the transcript.
Contributing Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
Feminist Design Methodology: Considering the Case of Maria Kipp

Feminist Design Methodology: Considering the Case of Maria Kipp

Date: December 2003
Creator: Lawrence, Anne
Description: This thesis uses the work and career of the textile designer Maria Kipp to stage a prolegomena concerning how to write about a female designer active during the middle of the twentieth century. How can design historians incorporate new methodologies in the writing of design history? This thesis explores the current literature of feminist design history for solutions to the potential problems of the traditional biography and applies these to the work and career of Kipp. It generates questions concerning the application of methodologies, specifically looking at a biographical methodology and new methodologies proposed by feminist design historians. Feminist writers encourage scholarship on unknown designers, while also they call for a different kind of writing and methodology. The goal of this thesis is to examine how these new histories are written and in what ways they might inspire the writing of Kipp into design history.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Dallas as Region: Mark Lemmon's Gothic Revival Highland Park Presbyterian Church

Dallas as Region: Mark Lemmon's Gothic Revival Highland Park Presbyterian Church

Date: August 2004
Creator: Bagley, Julie Arens
Description: Informed by the methodology utilized in Peter Williams's Houses of God: Region, Religion, and Architecture in the United States (1997), the thesis examines Mark Lemmon's Gothic Revival design for the Highland Park Presbyterian Church (1941) with special attention to the denomination and social class of the congregation and the architectural style of the church. Beginning with the notion that Lemmon's church is more complex than an expression of the Southern cultural region defined by Williams, the thesis presents the opportunity to examine the church in the context of the unique cultural region of the city of Dallas. Church archival material supports the argument that the congregation deliberately sought to identify with both the forms and ideology of the late nineteenth-century Gothic Revival in the northeastern United States, a result of the influence of Dallas's cultural region.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Art Criticism and the Gendering of Lee Bontecou's Art, ca. 1959 - 1964

Art Criticism and the Gendering of Lee Bontecou's Art, ca. 1959 - 1964

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2005
Creator: Estrada-Berg, Victoria
Description: This thesis identifies and analyzes gendering in the art writing devoted to Lee Bontecou's metal and canvas sculptures made from the 1959 - 1964. Through a careful reading of reviews and articles written about Bontecou's constructions, this thesis reconstructs the context of the art world in the United States at mid-century and investigates how cultural expectations regarding gender directed the reception of Bontecou's art, beginning in 1959 and continuing through mid-1960s. Incorporating a description of the contemporaneous cultural context with description of the constructions and an analysis of examples of primary writing, the thesis chronologically follows the evolution of a tendency in art writing to associate gender-specific motivation and interpretation to one recurring feature of Bontecou's works.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Round

Round

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: May 2001
Creator: Pepper, Jennifer Whayne
Description: My approach to the art making process is a kind of poetic reverie on forms and spaces. Webster’s Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary defines reverie as “a state of dreamy meditation or fanciful musing; a daydream, a fantastic, visionary or unpractical idea.” It is a romantic notion that has less to do with the big questions of existence than it does the incidental parts of daily existence. Reverie is a state of mind that comes from being receptive and finding simple pleasure in the affects of imagination. My paintings, drawings and sculpture evolve out of the freedom to imagine shapes and spaces that describe different kinds of interactions. They come from recollection, awareness, and observation of the diverse sensual phenomena that surrounds me. The variety of interactions between forms such as contrast, imbalance, balance or synchronicity, have the potential to evoke various aspects of being: vulnerability, uncertainty, confidence, and determination. Possible interactions between shapes and spaces are what intrigue me most. Recently, I expanded the investigation of form to include objects and consideration of space. As the scale of my paintings and drawings grew, I became interested in the effects of three-dimensional objects in a space, such as a gallery. My inquiry ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Sheep Tipping (It's All About Love)

Sheep Tipping (It's All About Love)

Date: May 2001
Creator: Daniel, Ray
Description: I believe that our individual religious experiences are just that, individual. Each of us has a different reaction to every narration, sermon, situation, and experience. Further, I believe these experiences are understood and maintained in or through abstract thought. In the parable of Jonah and the whale, what do you picture while reading the story? Most of what took place lacks any physical evidence of existence. The voice of the Spirit, the face of God, the sound of prayer in multitude, even the person begin swallowed by the fish, are all abstract in character. My paintings are visual investigations into the idea that most of our religious experiences and concepts are abstract in nature, thought, and experience. Continuing my exploration of how my specific Christian experiences can be expressed through abstract painting, I investigated how the placement of the ellipse or ellipses as a dividing line affects the field and how surface development, layering and the expressiveness of high intensity colors affected the specific experience or Biblical narrative chosen.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
Realismo Magico Digital: An Exploration of Self-Identity

Realismo Magico Digital: An Exploration of Self-Identity

Date: May 2001
Creator: Mateos, Cesar Augusto
Description: The internal necessity to rediscover myself constantly drives me back to the country where I spent most of my life, Mexico. I was born and raised in the heart of the world's largest metropolis, Mexico City and through the years I have photographed in locations with important significance for Mexican culture as well as for my personal history. I reorganize and reinvent these places, and by staging models there, I construct my personal interpretation of the Mexican way of life involving the world of “manana” (tomorrow) with its “dictadura perfecta” (perfect dictatorship), where opposite and contradictory situations exist side by side. I am particularly interested in the relationship between people and their environ-ment and I use this theme as a means to explore my own identity as a Mexican. One strategy involves juxtaposing cultural signifiers of Mexican culture. My images are an examination and a projection of my ideals, fears, and dreams about my country and myself.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
"Documenting" East Texas: Spirit of Place in the Photography of Keith Carter

"Documenting" East Texas: Spirit of Place in the Photography of Keith Carter

Date: August 2000
Creator: Lutz, Cullen Clark
Description: This thesis examines similarities in photographs made by the contemporary photographer Keith Carter and photographers active with the Farm Security Administration during the 1930s. Stylistically and in function, works by Carter and these photographers comment on social and cultural values of a region. This thesis demonstrates that many of Carter's black and white photographs continue, contribute to, and expand traditions in American documentary photography established in the 1930s. These traditions include the representation of a specific geographic place that evokes the spirit of a time and place, and the ability to communicate to a viewer certain social conditions and values related to such a place.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
When Reality Was Surreal: Lee Miller's World War II War Correspondence for  Vogue

When Reality Was Surreal: Lee Miller's World War II War Correspondence for Vogue

Access: Use of this item is restricted to the UNT Community.
Date: December 2003
Creator: Rose, Josh
Description: During World War II, Lee Miller was an accredited war correspondent for Vogue magazine. Miller was trained as a surrealist photographer by Man Ray, and her wartime work, both photographic and written, is indicative of a combination of journalism and surrealism. This thesis examines Lee Miller's war correspondence within the context of Vogue magazine, establishing parallels between the photographs and writing to determine how surrealism informs it stylistically and ideologically. Using surrealist techniques of juxtaposition and an unmanipulated photographic style, and the surrealist concepts of the Marvelous and Convulsive Beauty, Miller presented the war as a surreality, or a surreal reality. This study concludes by using Miller's approach to suggest a new concept of journalistic practice: surrealist journalism.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
An Examination of American Sideshow Banners as Folk Art, ca. 1920-1960

An Examination of American Sideshow Banners as Folk Art, ca. 1920-1960

Date: December 2002
Creator: Weimer, Emery Christian
Description: This thesis redresses the lack of scholarly attention paid to painted circus banners produced in the United States during the first half of the twentieth century by exploring the extent to which American folk art painting scholarship, methodologies, and objects can be used to articulate the meaning and significance of banner painting. This study expands the disciplinary treatment of banner painting by introducing domesticated art as a means of representing non-academic art produced in the U.S. The thesis also presents a model for exploring banner painting after identifying traditional American folk art painting methodologies, which fail to investigate banner painting style, format, and artistic training associated with banner work.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
A Stylistic Analysis of American Indian Portrait Photography in Oklahoma, 1869-1904

A Stylistic Analysis of American Indian Portrait Photography in Oklahoma, 1869-1904

Date: May 2001
Creator: Nelson, Amy
Description: This thesis studies the style of Native American portrait photographs of William S. Soule (1836-1908), John K. Hillers (1834-1925), and William E. Irwin (1871-1935), who worked in Oklahoma from 1869 to 1904. The examination of the three men's work revealed that each artist had different motivations for creating Native American portrait photographs, and a result, used a distinct style. However, despite the individual artistic styles, each artist conformed to Native American stereotypes common during the nineteenth-century. The thesis includes a discussion of the history of the area, photographer biographies, a stylistic analysis of the photographs, and how the images fit into American Indian stereotypes.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries
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