Controversies over Redefining "Fill Material" Under the Clean Water Act

Controversies over Redefining "Fill Material" Under the Clean Water Act

Date: January 23, 2014
Creator: Copeland, Claudia
Description: This report discusses the 2002 rule (the Clean Water Act), focusing on how it changes which material and types of activities are regulated under Section 404 and the significance of these issues, especially for the mining industry.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF): Program Overview and Issues

Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF): Program Overview and Issues

Date: April 10, 2014
Creator: Tiemann, Mary
Description: This report discusses the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Amendments of 1996, which authorized a drinking water state revolving loan fund (DWSRF) program. The program was intended to help public water systems finance infrastructure projects that were needed to comply with federal drinking water regulations and to meet the Act's health objectives. It includes an overview of funding, allotments and set-asides, drinking water infrastructure needs, program issues, and legislative activity.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Safeguarding the Nation's Drinking Water: EPA and Congressional Actions

Safeguarding the Nation's Drinking Water: EPA and Congressional Actions

Date: June 2, 2008
Creator: Tiemann, Mary
Description: This report discusses the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) efforts to increase drinking water security, Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, and EPA and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) water infrastructure security roles.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
[Water Trough]

[Water Trough]

Date: 194u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Description: Photograph of water flowing down a handmade trough.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF): Program Overview and Issues

Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF): Program Overview and Issues

Date: April 8, 2015
Creator: Tiemann, Mary
Description: This report discusses the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Amendments of 1996, which authorized a drinking water state revolving loan fund (DWSRF) program. The program was intended to help public water systems finance infrastructure projects that were needed to comply with federal drinking water regulations and to meet the Act's health objectives. It includes an overview of funding, allotments and set-asides, drinking water infrastructure needs, program issues, and legislative activity.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF): Program Overview and Issues

Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF): Program Overview and Issues

Date: February 6, 2015
Creator: Tiemann, Mary
Description: This report discusses the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Amendments of 1996, which authorized a drinking water state revolving loan fund (DWSRF) program. It includes an overview of funding, allotments and set-asides, drinking water infrastructure needs, program issues, and legislative activity.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program

Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program

Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Cook, Echol E. & Beatty, Tia Maria
Description: The following paragraphs comprise the research efforts during the second quarter of 1998 (April 1 - June 30.) These tasks have been granted a continuation until the end of August 1998. This report represents the last technical quarterly report deliverable for the WVU Cooperative Agreement - Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Final draft technical reports will be the next submission. During this period, work was completed on the Injection and Circulation of Potable Water Through PVDs on Task 1.6 - Pilot Scale Demonstration of TCE Flushing Through PVDs at the DOE/RMI Extrusion Plant. The data has been evaluated and representative graphs are presented. The plot of Cumulative Injected Volume vs. Cumulative Week Time show the ability to consistently inject through the two center PVDs at a rate of approximately ten (10) gallons per hour. This injection rate was achieved under a static head that varied from five (5) feet to three (3) feet. The plot of Extracted Flow Rate vs. Cumulative Week Time compares the extraction rate with and without the injection of water. The injection operation was continuous for eight hour periods while the extraction operation was executed over a pulsing schedule. Extraction rates as high as forty-five ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Preliminary demonstration of power beaming with non-coherent laser diode arrays

Preliminary demonstration of power beaming with non-coherent laser diode arrays

Date: February 26, 1999
Creator: Kare, J T; Militsky, F & Weisberg, A
Description: A preliminary demonstration of free-space electric power transmission has been conducted using non-coherent laser diode arrays as the transmitter and standard silicon photovoltaic cell arrays as the receiver. The transmitter assembly used a high-power-density array of infrared laser diode bars, water cooled via integrated microchannel heat sinks and focused by cylindrical microlenses. The diode array composite beam was refocused by a parabolic mirror over a 10 meter path, and received on a {approximately}15 x 25 cm panel of thinned single crystal high efficiency silicon solar cells. The maximum cell output obtained was several watts, and the cell output was used to drive a small motor. Due to operating constraints and unexpected effects, particularly the high nonuniformity of the output beam, both the distance and total received power in this demonstration were modest. However, the existing transmitter is capable of supplying several hundred watts of light output, with a projected received electric power in excess of 200 watts. The source radiance is approximately 5 x 10{sup 9} W/m{sup 2}-steradian. With the existing 20 cm aperture, useful power transmission over ranges to {approximately}100 meters should be achievable with a DC to DC efficiency of greater than 10%. Non-coherent sources of this type ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Portable Imaging Polarimeter and Imaging Experiments

Portable Imaging Polarimeter and Imaging Experiments

Date: November 1, 1999
Creator: PHIPPS,GARY S.; KEMME,SHANALYN A.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; DESCOUR,M.R.; GARCIA,J.P. & DERENIAK,E.L.
Description: Polarimetry is the method of recording the state of polarization of light. Imaging polarimetry extends this method to recording the spatially resolved state of polarization within a scene. Imaging-polarimetry data have the potential to improve the detection of manmade objects in natural backgrounds. We have constructed a midwave infrared complete imaging polarimeter consisting of a fixed wire-grid polarizer and rotating form-birefringent retarder. The retardance and the orientation angles of the retarder were optimized to minimize the sensitivity of the instrument to noise in the measurements. The optimal retardance was found to be 132{degree} rather than the typical 90{degree}. The complete imaging polarimeter utilized a liquid-nitrogen cooled PtSi camera. The fixed wire-grid polarizer was located at the cold stop inside the camera dewar. The complete imaging polarimeter was operated in the 4.42-5 {micro}m spectral range. A series of imaging experiments was performed using as targets a surface of water, an automobile, and an aircraft. Further analysis of the polarization measurements revealed that in all three cases the magnitude of circular polarization was comparable to the noise in the calculated Stokes-vector components.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Development of a simulation tool to evaluate the performance of radiant cooling ceilings

Development of a simulation tool to evaluate the performance of radiant cooling ceilings

Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Stetiu, C.; Feustel, H.E. & Winkelmann, F.C.
Description: Considerable electrical energy used to cool nonresidential buildings equipped with All-Air Systems is drawn by the fans that transport the cool air through the thermal distribution system. Hydropic Cooling Systems have the potential to reduce the amount of air transported through the building by separating the tasks of ventilation and thermal conditioning. Due to the physical properties of water, Hydropic Cooling Systems can transport a given amount of thermal energy using less than 5% of the otherwise necessary fan energy. They are suited to the dry climates that are typical of California and been used for more than 30 years in hospital rooms. However, energy savings and peak-load characteristics have not yet been analyzed. Adequate guidelines for their design and control systems has prevented lack of their widespread application to other building types. Evaluation of theoretical performance of Hydropic Systems could be made by computer models. Energy analysis programs such as DOE-2 do not yet have the capacity to simulate Hydropic Cooling Systems. Scope of this project is developing a model that can accurately simulate the dynamic performance of Hydropic Radiant Cooling Systems. The model can calculate loads, heat extraction rates, room air temperature and room surface temperature distributions, and ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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