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Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Date: April 15, 2002
Creator: Branaman, Brenda
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Date: July 11, 2002
Creator: Branaman, Brenda
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Date: September 4, 2002
Creator: Branaman, Brenda
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Date: May 29, 2002
Creator: Branaman, Brenda
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Date: October 24, 2002
Creator: Branaman, Brenda
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Date: November 14, 2002
Creator: Branaman, Brenda
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Fruits and Vegetables: Issues for Congress

Date: January 27, 2003
Creator: Branaman, Brenda
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Fruits and Vegetables: Ongoing Issues for Congress

Fruits and Vegetables: Ongoing Issues for Congress

Date: November 13, 2000
Creator: Branaman, Brenda
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
A study of the metal content of municipal solid waste. Final report

A study of the metal content of municipal solid waste. Final report

Date: January 1, 1998
Creator: Churney, K.L. & Domalski, E.S.
Description: Knowledge of the content of toxic components, so called pollutant precursors, in the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream is essential to development of the strategies for source reduction and reuse, recycling, composting and disposal. Data are scarce; trends in composition for any locality even more so. In a previous study the total and water soluble chlorine content of the components of municipal solid waste were determined from sampling studies at two sites, Baltimore County, MD, and Brooklyn, NY, each for a five day period. The total sulfur content of the combined combustible components was also determined. Because of the scarcity of data and synergistic effects, it seemed appropriate to determine the heavy metal content of the preceding material prior to its disposal. The metals chosen were the so-called priority pollutant metals (PPM): antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, thallium, and zinc.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Radionuclide concentrations in pinto beans, sweet corn, and zucchini squash grown in Los Alamos Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory

Radionuclide concentrations in pinto beans, sweet corn, and zucchini squash grown in Los Alamos Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory

Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Fresquez, P.R.; Mullen, M.A.; Naranjo, L. Jr. & Armstrong, D.R.
Description: Pinto beans, sweet corn, and zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo var. black beauty) were grown in a randomized complete-block field/pot experiment at a site that contained the highest observed levels of surface gross gamma radioactivity within Los Alamos Canyon (LAC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Soils as well as washed edible and nonedible crop tissues were analyzed for various radionuclides and heavy metals . Most radionuclides, with the exception of {sup 3}H and {sup tot}U, in soil from LAC were detected in significantly higher concentrations (p <0.01) than in soil collected from regional background (RBG) locations. Similarly, most radionuclides in edible crop portions of beans, squash, and corn were detected in significantly higher (p <0.01 and 0.05) concentrations than RBG. Most soil-to-plant concentration ratios for radionuclides in edible and nonedible crop tissues from LAC were within the default values given by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency. All heavy metals in soils, as well as edible and nonedible crop tissues grown in soils from LAC, were within RBG concentrations. Overall, the total maximum net positive committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE)--the CEDE plus two sigma for each radioisotope minus background and then all positive doses summed--to a hypothetical 50-year resident ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET

Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET

Date: July 23, 2012
Creator: Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J. et al.
Description: The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Current radiological status of Utirik Atoll

Current radiological status of Utirik Atoll

Date: August 1, 1998
Creator: Robison, W L
Description: A preliminary radiological survey was conducted at Utirik Atoll in 1978 as part of the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (NMIRS). A dose assessment based on these limited data indicated a relatively low dose of about 0.12 mSv to people living on Utirik in 1978 (Robison et al., 1982). A much more detailed radiological survey was conducted in April of both 1993 and 1994. Aerial photos of the islands of Utirik Atoll were taken as part of the 1978 NMIRS. The sampling grids for the 1993 and 1994 surveys are shown overlaid on these aerial photos in Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4. External gamma measurements and a collection of either drinking coconuts or copra coconuts were made at each location. Pandanus, breadfruit, lime, and banana were collected where available. Ground water was collected in 1993/94 from four wells on Utirik Island and two wells on Aon Island. Surface soil and soil profiles were collected at some of the grid points on each of the islands at the atoll in 1993/94. A comparison of the number of samples collected in 1978 and 1993/94 are shown in Table 1. A detailed listing of the samples collected in the 1993/94 radiological survey ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Uptake of 137Cs by Leafy Vegetables and Grains from Calcareous Soils

Uptake of 137Cs by Leafy Vegetables and Grains from Calcareous Soils

Date: April 19, 2004
Creator: Robison, W; Hamilton, T; Conrado, C & Kehl, S
Description: Cesium-137 was deposited on Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll in 1954 as a result of nuclear testing and has been transported and cycled in the ecosystem ever since. Atoll soils are of marine origin and are almost pure CaCO{sub 3} with high concentrations of organic matter in the top 40 cm. Data from previous experiments with mature fruit trees show very high transfer factors (TF's), [Bq g{sup -1} plant/ Bq g{sup -1} soil, both in dry weight] into fruits from atoll calcareous soil. These TF's are much higher than reported for continental, silica-based soils. In this report TF's for 5 types of leafy vegetable crops and 2 types of grain crops are provided for use in predictive dose assessments and for comparison with other data from other investigators working with other types of soil in the IAEA CRP ''The Classification of Soil Systems on the Basis of Transfer Factors of Radionuclides from Soil to Reference Plants''. Transfer factors for plants grown on calcareous soil are again very high relative to clay-containing soils and range from 23 to 39 for grain crops and 21 to 113 for leafy vegetables. Results from these experiments, in this unique, high pH, high organic content, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

Date: January 1, 2008
Creator: Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina & Galitsky, Christina
Description: The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Evaluation of the use of sludge containing plutonium as a soil conditioner for food crops

Evaluation of the use of sludge containing plutonium as a soil conditioner for food crops

Date: September 17, 1975
Creator: Myers, D.S.; Silver, W.J.; Coles, D.G.; Lamson, K.C.; McIntyre, D.R. & Mendoza, B.
Description: An experiment was conducted to assess the potential hazard associated with the use of sludge containing plutonium as a soil conditioner for food crops. Conditions were chosen that would maximize exposure to the $sup 239$Pu in the sludge through resuspension and in plant content and thus approximated the maximum potential hazards due to the inhalation and ingestion pathways. The estimated 50-year radiation doses to the pulmonary region of the lung, bone, and liver based on the results of the inhalation experiment are 6 x 10$sup -4$ rem, 1.2 x 10$sup -3$ rem, and 0.55 x 10$sup -4$ rem, respectively. Similarly, the 50- year radiation doses attributable to ingestion of the sludge-grown vegetables were 2.2 x 10$sup -5$ rem to the bone and 1.5 x 10$sup -5$ rem to the liver. Thus, the inhalation pathway is the more critical of the two. The maximum permissible annual doses to the lungs, bone, and the liver for a member of the general public are 1.5, 3.0, and 1.5 rem, respectively. Thus, the maximum credible 50-year lung, bone, and liver dose commitments associated with the use of the $sup 239$Pu-contaminated sludge as a soil conditioner are approximately 4.0 x 10$sup -2$ percent of the ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste

Energy Supply- Production of Fuel from Agricultural and Animal Waste

Date: March 25, 2009
Creator: Miller, Gabriel
Description: The Society for Energy and Environmental Research (SEER) was funded in March 2004 by the Department of Energy, under grant DE-FG-36-04GO14268, to produce a study, and oversee construction and implementation, for the thermo-chemical production of fuel from agricultural and animal waste. The grant focuses on the Changing World Technologies (CWT) of West Hempstead, NY, thermal conversion process (TCP), which converts animal residues and industrial food processing biproducts into fuels, and as an additional product, fertilizers. A commercial plant was designed and built by CWT, partially using grant funds, in Carthage, Missouri, to process animal residues from a nearby turkey processing plant. The DOE sponsored program consisted of four tasks. These were: Task 1 Optimization of the CWT Plant in Carthage - This task focused on advancing and optimizing the process plant operated by CWT that converts organic waste to fuel and energy. Task 2 Characterize and Validate Fuels Produced by CWT - This task focused on testing of bio-derived hydrocarbon fuels from the Carthage plant in power generating equipment to determine the regulatory compliance of emissions and overall performance of the fuel. Task 3 Characterize Mixed Waste Streams - This task focused on studies performed at Princeton University to better ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Vermont Biofuels Initiative: Local Production for Local Use to Supply a Portion of Vermont’s Energy Needs

Vermont Biofuels Initiative: Local Production for Local Use to Supply a Portion of Vermont’s Energy Needs

Date: May 31, 2009
Creator: Sawyer, Scott & Kahler, Ellen
Description: The Vermont Biofuels initiative (VBI) is the Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund’s (VSJF) biomass-to-biofuels market development program. Vermont is a small state with a large petroleum dependency for transportation (18th in per capita petroleum consumption) and home heating (55% of all households use petroleum for heating). The VBI marks the first strategic effort to reduce Vermont’s dependency on petroleum through the development of homegrown alternatives. As such, it supports the four key priorities of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Multi-year Biomass Plan: 1.) Dramatically reduce dependence on foreign oil; 2.) Promote the use of diverse, domestic and sustainable energy resources; 3.) Reduce carbon emissions from energy production and consumption; 4.) Establish a domestic bioindustry. In 2005 VSJF was awarded with a $496,000 Congressionally directed award from U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy. This award was administered through the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG36- 05GO85017, hereafter referred to as DOE FY05) with $396,000 to be used by VSJF for biodiesel development and $100,000 to be used by the Vermont Department of Public Service for methane biodigester projects. The intent and strategic focus of the VBI is similar to another DOE funded organization– the Biofuels Center of North Carolina–in that it is a nonprofit driven, ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department