Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the major outer surface protein, OSP-A from North American and European isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi

Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the major outer surface protein, OSP-A from North American and European isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi

Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: McGrath, B.C.; Dunn, J.J.; France, L.L.; Jaing, W.; Polin, D.; Gorgone, G. et al.
Description: Lyme borreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne disease in North America and Western Europe. As the major delayed immune response in humans, a better understanding of the major outer surface lipoproteins OspA and OspB are of much interest. These proteins have been shown to exhibit three distinct phylogenetic genotypes based on their DNA sequences. This paper describes the cloning of genomic DNA for each variant and amplification of PCR. DNA sequence data was used to derive computer driven phylogenetic analysis and deduced amino acid sequences. Overproduction of variant OspAs was carried out in E. coli using a T7-based expression system. Circular dichroism and fluorescence studies was carried out on the recombinant B31 PspA yielding evidence supporting a B31 protein containing 11% alpha-helix, 34% antiparallel beta-sheet, 12% parallel beta sheet.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Progress in rapid detection and identification of unknown human and agricultural pathogens

Progress in rapid detection and identification of unknown human and agricultural pathogens

Date: August 13, 1999
Creator: Barnes, T; Holzrichter, J F & Milanovich, F P
Description: The medical industry is driving pathogen detection technology from its present characteristics of $50/sample, 100 sample capability systems, with several day time responses, having several percent error rates in reported outcomes. The systems described above are capable of providing samples at < $5/test, managing several million samples, < 1-hour cycle times, (or just minutes in some cases) and < 0.1% error rates. Because of their importance to the medical and agricultural communities, all ''important'' pathogens will have detection kits available (within air transport times, anywhere in the world) by 2020, and the most well known pathogens will have kits available within a few years. Many are available now. Because of the importance of the food supply to modern nations, these technologies will be employed everywhere in this industry. For example, the United States imports 30 B tons of food a year, but inspects < 1%. Portable inspection systems will make it possible to test for dangerous pathogens in feed lots, food processing plants, markets, and points of use. Outbreaks of animal or plant disease will be immediately detectable using field instrumentation, and more complex samples can be sent to central testing laboratories where more sophisticated test systems will be available. ...
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (P.L. 112-144)

The Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (P.L. 112-144)

Date: August 21, 2012
Creator: Thaul, Susan; Bagalman, Erin; Corby-Edwards, Amalia K.; Glassgold, Judith M.; Johnson, Judith A.; Lister, Sarah A. et al.
Description: This report provides a brief policy background narrative and an overview of provisions for each title of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA), P.L. 112-144. The legislation amends the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) to expand the authority of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in performing its human drug, biological product, and medical device responsibilities.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Smallpox Vaccine Stockpile and Vaccination Policy

Smallpox Vaccine Stockpile and Vaccination Policy

Date: September 9, 2002
Creator: Johnson, Judith A
Description: None
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Modeling the effects of prior infection on vaccine efficacy

Modeling the effects of prior infection on vaccine efficacy

Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S.; Ackley, D.H. & Perelson, A.S.
Description: We performed computer simulations to study the effects of prior infection on vaccine efficacy. We injected three antigens sequentially. The first antigen, designated the prior, represented a prior infection or vaccination. The second antigen, the vaccine, represented a single component of the trivalent influenza vaccine. The third antigen, the epidemic, represented challenge by an epidemic strain. For a fixed vaccine to epidemic strain cross-reactivities to the vaccine and to the epidemic strains. We found that, for many cross-reactivities, vaccination, when it had been preceded by a prior infection, provided more protection than vaccination alone. However, at some cross-reactivities, the prior infection reduced protection by clearing the vaccine before it had the chance to produce protective memory. The cross-reactivities between the prior, vaccine and epidemic strains played a major role in determining vaccine efficacy. This work has applications to understanding vaccination against viruses such as influenza that are continually mutating.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department