The Cultivation of Peppermint and Spearmint

The Cultivation of Peppermint and Spearmint

Date: 1915
Creator: Van Fleet, Walter
Description: This report discusses the cultivation of peppermint and spearmint in the United States, especially in the northeastern and mid-western United States. Climate and soil conditions, fertilizers, diseases and pests, and the costs of cultivation are discussed.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Field Pea as a Forage Crop

The Field Pea as a Forage Crop

Date: 1915
Creator: Vinall, H. N. (Harry Nelson), 1880-1937
Description: "This bulletin treats of the field pea as a forage crop, whether grown for hay or for grain for stock, and does not include the cowpea, which, as above stated, is really a bean." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Handling and Shipping Citrus Fruits in the Gulf States

Handling and Shipping Citrus Fruits in the Gulf States

Date: 1915
Creator: Ramsey, H. J.
Description: This report discusses the best methods for harvesting, handling, packaging, and shipping the citrus fruits that are grown along the Gulf Coast of the United States. Citrus fruits must be handled carefully by fruit-pickers in the field and then carefully washed, packed, and stored in order to avoid decay during shipping.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
The Culture of Rice in California

The Culture of Rice in California

Date: 1915
Creator: Chambliss, Charles E. & Adams, E. L.
Description: This report discusses rice cultivation in California and makes recommendations for its improvement. All aspects of rice cultivation are discussed, but the topics of irrigation and weed control receive special attention.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Citrus-Fruit Improvement: How to Secure and Use Tree-Performance Records

Citrus-Fruit Improvement: How to Secure and Use Tree-Performance Records

Date: 1917
Creator: Shamel, A. D. (Archibald Dixon)
Description: "Many California citrus growers have reported in recent years that they were securing lower yields of fruit per acre than in the earlier history of their industry. Complaint also has been made that an increasing proportion of the fruit of the leading commercial varieties of oranges and lemons was abnormal or 'off type' in size, form, color, smoothness of skin, or other important characteristics.... The results obtained in bud-selection experiments carried on during the past five years indicate that by top-working with buds from those having consistently good records for productiveness and quality the inferior or 'drone' trees of such varieties as Washington Navel and Valencia oranges can be made productive and profitable. This bulletin describes the methods that have been found effective and practicable in locating the desirable and undesirable trees in groves and for transforming the latter when found." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Grains for the Dry Lands of Central Oregon

Grains for the Dry Lands of Central Oregon

Date: 1917
Creator: Breithaupt, L. R. (Le Roy), 1886-
Description: "This bulletin discusses the production of small grains on non-irrigated lands in central and southeastern Oregon at elevations between 4,000 and 5,000 feet. The important crops for these dry-farmed lands are winter wheat and rye and spring wheat, rye, oats, and barley. Field peas are also of value as a legume for forage and grain. Dependence upon grain farming alone, however, is not advisable in this region; the grain crops should be grown for the winter feeding and the finishing of stock that are grazed on the nearby range." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Sweet Clover: Utilization

Sweet Clover: Utilization

Date: 1917
Creator: Coe, H. S.
Description: This report discusses the different uses of sweet clover as a crop for hay, silage, pasturage, soiling, feed, and soil improvement.
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Fig Growing in the South Atlantic and Gulf States

Fig Growing in the South Atlantic and Gulf States

Date: 1919
Creator: Gould, H. P.
Description: "This bulletin describes the varieties of figs most suitable for the South Atlantic and Gulf States, tells how to grow them and protect them from diseases and insects, and suggests methods of making them into desirable products for the table." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
An Improved Method of Making Sugar-Beet Sirup

An Improved Method of Making Sugar-Beet Sirup

Date: 1921
Creator: Townsend, C. O. & Sherwood, S. F.
Description: "This bulletin tells how to grow sugar beets in the garden and describes a simple process of making from them a palatable and nutritious table sirup with a pleasant flavor. A patent for the process of making the sirup has been issued for the benefit of the public, so that anyone is free to use it. Tests have proved the process to be practicable. Sugar beets may be grown in any locality which has tillable soil that is capable of producing good crops of vegetables. A small piece of ground is sufficient for planting a few rows of beets -- enough to furnish the family with sirup. The tools needed are necessary in any garden operation -- a spade, a hoe, and a rake. All mature sugar beets, if properly handled, will produce a sirup. The beets are cleaned, peeled, cut into thin slices, and soaked in hot water to extract the sugar. The liquid is then treated and boiled down to the thickness desired. Detailed directions are given in the following pages." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Green Manuring

Green Manuring

Date: 1922
Creator: Piper, Charles V. (Charles Vancouver), 1867-1926 & Pieters, A. J.
Description: "Green manuring means turning under suitable crops to enrich the soil. Such crops may be turned under green or when ripe. Green manuring adds organic matter and, directly or indirectly, nitrogen to the soil. Leguminous crops are most desirable for green manuring, since they add to the soil nitrogen gathered from the air in addition to the organic matter which they carry. Besides the nitrogen in the legumes turned under, an additional supply of nitrogen is fixed in the soil by the action of bacteria, using the carbon in the organic matter as a source of energy. Turning under an entire crop is advised only when the soil is poor and for the purpose of starting a rotation. Turning under catch crops or winter-grown green crops is an economical and successful method of supplying nitrogen." -- p. 2
Contributing Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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